Happy Monday! Episode 74 here to make it a little better for you. Phoenix is joined by Prince "Trooper" Brathwaite. Prince is in the Daily Burn network and owner of Trooper Fitness. He is big on mental strength just as much as he is in physical. He'll share his trooper mentality, thoughts on how to make HIIT better, and answer some questions from the Daily Burn community. All in all, sit back, relax, and just soak in the knowledge Phoenix and Prince share on episode 74.
Explosive lifts are an important aspect for boxing and you should implement this style with your every day flat bench press. Bring the bar down at a normal pace and then explode up to complete the rep. You may have to work with a slightly lighter weight than you are accustomed to and that is not the most important thing here, so don’t lose any sleep over it. The motion will help you with jabbing and the power needed behind them for added effectiveness, as well as push off skills to avoid a clench.

How to: Sit on the floor with your legs bent in front of you and feet on the floor. Place your palms on the floor by your sides. Brace your core and bring your butt a few inches off the floor and lift your chest up. Crawl forward, keeping your core tight, and build speed as you become more comfortable with the movement. Give your body a chance to adjust to this exercise — you’ll get the hang of it with some patience and practice!

The ANAEROBIC system (aka the glycolytic system), is a faster acting system that can produce ATP even in the absence of oxygen. The downside to this faster ATP-production rate is that it can only breakdown carbohydrates as fuel and it creates a significant amount of lactate (commonly known as lactic acid). Lactate is correlated with exercise and performance fatigue, but the concept is often misinterpreted in the MMA and strength & conditioning world (more on this later). Exercise bouts of moderate to high intensities, lasting upwards to 2-3 minutes are mainly fueled by the anaerobic energy system.


I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
“I am a huge fan of BJJ and MMA so this chance for me to learn what I have seen is very very cool. It is an honor to be taught by you after learning so much about your martial arts history and your practice under Rickson. The Warrior’s Cove is, in my opinion, the only place to go for martial arts training. Everything is very practical due to it being based on real life scenarios. I have learned so much in just the 4 weeks I have been there. I have a very demanding job (Senior Loan Officer) and I am almost always able to work around my schedule because of the class availability. I think whether you are a beginner looking for self defense skills or you want to expand on past martial art experiences, the Warrior’s Cove has what you are looking for. Thank you Dave for everything! I look forward to my future with the Cove and getting a Black Belt from you or Rickson himself!”
If Le Corre’s description of ancient warriors jumping and climbing walls seems incongruous with traditional combat training, the regimen appears even funkier in present day. Video of McGregor training before his fight with Aldo appeared online last year. It shows a montage of the fighter performing drills – presumably cobbled together in a random sequence – that might seem culled from the B-reel of a Bruce Lee movie.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
An expert in leadership and human performance, Dr. Paul "Paulie Gloves" Gavoni is a highly successful professional striking coach in mixed martial arts. As an athletic leader and former golden gloves heavyweight champion of Florida, Coach Paulie successfully applies the science of human behavior to coach multiple fighters to championship titles at varying levels worldwide. With many successful fighters on his resume, Coach Paulie tailors his approach to fit the needs of specific fighters based on a fighters behavioral, physiological, and psychological characteristics. Coach Paulie is a writer for Last Word on Sports and is a featured coach in the book, Beast: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts.
Another common myth is that lactate doesn't form until you perform high-intensity exercises. Lactate actually forms even during lower intensity exercise (because the anaerobic system is still active to a degree). The amount of lactate produced is very minimal; we are able to shuttle this lactate into our mitochondria via the Cori-Cycle and effectively reuse it as energy. During the later round of a intense brawl however, the rate of lactate clearance simply cannot match the rate of which it is produced, this is called the lactate threshold. The figure below shows how lactate is recycled as energy after being produced as a by-product of fast glycoglysis (anaerobic metabolism).
An English degree means you are adaptable, and are not limited to a single career path. While writing and publishing are direct ways to fight racism, most English majors are not authors. You can become a teacher of literature, writing, or even English as a second language. You can be an advocate, working in charities for underserved populations, and refugee aid programs. You can take your English degree and use it to pursue a law degree, ultimately becoming a civil rights or immigration lawyer.
[…] Obviously having the ability to protect yourself and knowing that you’re in shape and capable of taking somebody on when it comes to the mats would be enough to give anybody self-confidence, even if you don’t plan on using that new found strength and focus on anybody in particular. Don’t be fooled into thinking that reaching a point where you can call yourself an MMA athlete will come easy, because the work is grueling and it takes both physical and mental stability to make it through the intensity of both the workouts and the matches necessary to become adept, but the self-confidence will grow as you do. Boldanddetermined.com explains: […]
OK, so while round one will help you with your explosive conditioning and ability to recover fast, in this round we’re going to the ground, which is where a lot of MMA fighter’s spend a good amount of time. The Turkish Get Up is an amazing drill for stability, learning to create tension in the body and building static strength. It was a staple drill in the Turkish wrestling world back in the day. This is a very old school drill that is having it’s renaissance right now and for very good reason, it’s an amazing, basic, fundamental movement pattern.
But the Chicago Tribune noted in 1987 that Horowitz waged successful campaigns to remove life-threatening sulfites from salad bars and to require automakers to install rear window collision-avoidance lights. He was honored by consumer groups and in 1981 became the first newsman to receive the Chief U.S. Postal Inspector’s Award for uncovering mail fraud, the Tribune reported.

Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
Racial issues often intersect with political issues. Slavery, segregation, Jim Crow laws, and the Civil Rights movement provide prominent historical examples of this intersection. Today, countless issues underscore this same intersection, including disproportionate public funding for underserved minorities; water contamination in Flint, Michigan; overrepresentation of minorities in the penal system; racial profiling; police brutality; racially-motivated domestic terror; threats of deportation based on skin color and religion; pervasive institutional racism; gerrymandering; voter ID laws; and the list goes on.
Elite MMA is the top mixed martial arts (MMA) training facility in the greater Houston area, with school locations in Houston, Baytown, Greenway Plaza and Kingwood. We are experts in the instruction of self-defense, muay thai, kickboxing, boxing, mixed martial arts (MMA) and Brazilian Ju Jitsu (BJJ), offering these essential classes across Houston. We pride ourselves on providing an environment for fun, happiness, and personal growth each day we come together. Thank you for coming to our web site.
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.
So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?
Oh really? I know several females who have taken on males in our gym, and the sport is not manly it is EMPOWERING. Get in the cage with a real female fighter maybe like Ronda, or Holly. See how you do then. As an MMA fighter it is surprising how ignorant you are, most fighters have open minds, and believe we are ALL ONE. TRUE FIGHTERS AT HEART. Which you are not, obviously.
The Team Quest kids MMA program is for kids ages 5 -11years old and allows students to learn skills in MMA, Jiu Jitsu, Kickboxing, Boxing, Wrestling, Submission Wrestling, Karate & Tae-Kwan do. If your child is looking for a change from regular sports, then this is it. The Team Quest kids MMA in Portland program empowers kids through Martial Arts to become focused, self disciplined and respectful to others.
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.
Professional fights are 3 x 5 minute rounds with 1 minute rest in between rounds and Championship bouts are 5 x 5 minute rounds with 1 minute rest in between rounds. Amateur fights are slightly shorter, generally 3 x 3 minutes or less. A 15 minute or 25 minute fight then, requires a full spectrum of endurance capabilities. A respectable aerobic energy system must be developed to last the whole duration of the fight, while the short, repeated bursts of high-intensity action require a degree of anaerobic capacity and neuromuscular-alactic power.

Muay Thai is the kickboxing style most commonly used in professional Mixed Martial Arts (UFC) style competitions. It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because it allows use of punches, kicks, elbows, and knees—making it the most versatile and effective striking system on the planet. Even better, it is a great workout and not boring—this motivates people who normally hate going to the gym and gets them working out!
On February 29, 2012, the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation (IMMAF) was set up to bring international structure, development and support to mixed martial arts worldwide.[162] IMMAF launched with support of market leader, the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[163][164] The IMMAF is a non-profit, democratic federation organized according to international federation standards to ensure that MMA as a sport is allowed the same recognition, representation and rights as all other major sports. The IMMAF is registered under Swedish law and is founded on democratic principles, as outlined in their statutes.[165] As of March 2015, there are 39 total members from 38[166] countries, which come from Austria, Bahrain, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cameroon, Canada, Czech Republic, Denmark, El Salvador, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Iceland, India, Ireland (Northern Ireland), Italy, Jordan, Lebanon, Lithuania, Malaysia, Nepal, The Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Pakistan, Paraguay, Poland, Portugal, Romania, The Seychelles, South Africa, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Ukraine, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.[166] [166][166]
May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.
NOTES & REMINDERS AT THIS POINT: #1. Use your head, not your ego when selecting the Kettlebells you are going to use for this workout. #2. Excellent form before volume please! Meaning, make sure the correct form, execution and function of the exercise takes center stage over how many reps can you knock out. Again, leave your ego in the car or the locker room, not on the mat. Savvy? #3. If you are not familiar with the how to’s of the exercise, do not wing it, go see a trainer! PERIOD!
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.

Whether you intend to become a newspaper journalist, publishing in print and on the web, or a television reporter, or even an investigative documentarian, a degree in journalism can give you the mix of practical skills and critical knowledge necessary for spreading awareness of racial issues. A strong journalist is not satisfied with merely reporting surface issues, but wants deeper answers, and will do the necessary digging to get them.
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