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Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.
2) Way Down Way Back-Feet spread more than shoulder width apart, torso erect, arms at shoulder height to the sides, elbows bent at right angle with fists pointed up. Bring fists to stomach striking stomach and then immediately bend forward at the waist and lightly striking fists to floor, as you arise, again strike fists to stomach and then return to starting position. This is a ballistic exercise done quickly with intensity and is designed to warm up the shoulders, torso, and stretch the lower body.
Practice fighting routines. Finally, it's important to practice the techniques and movements you'll utilize during fights. Work with your coach, use boxing bags, perform shadow boxing or have practice matches to perfect your fight technique. Fighters often split their training routines into two workouts per day, allowing them to perform resistance and cardio exercises separate from their fighting routines. Try to practice technical fight training at least three days a week.
Directions: Stand with your feet half-a-foot apart. Quickly bend at your knees and drop your hands down to the floor. At the same time, kick your legs out behind you. Your body should be aligned, head to toe. Do a pushup. Jump your feet back to standing. Lower down into a slight squat and swing your arms behind you. Jump forward as far as you can, propelling your arms to help drive your body forward. Land on both feet and assume the initial stance. 
“I am very happy with my membership and training.  I have been most impressed by the people there and how friendly, helpful and approachable everyone is.  And this goes from the top down and includes instructors as well as other class members.  Having no prior martial arts training, I was a little concerned when my boyfriend convinced me to join that there would be a lot of hard core, militant types in the class that would be intimidating to a small woman like me.  On the contrary, I’ve found everyone to be friendly and approachable and easy to work with.  I am sure that attitude is instilled from the top down (meaning you) because your class members want to emulate you.  So they take cues from you and when they see that you are respectful of everyone and friendly and approachable in your training style, they act the same way.  So please don’t change a thing about that…because I continue to be impressed every class by how wonderful the people are!”
Don't overtrain. While being sore is natural, you don't want to overdo it. When you get physically fatigued, overly sore, or injured, take time off from training and let your body recover. If you don't let your body recover from training, you can become weaker and less focused. Fatigue, weakness, decreased performance, and constant muscle soreness are signs of overtraining.[12]

IMHO Judo is legit for self defence. Hell, I know what’s coming and still it’s disconcerting to see your world spin and end up on your back. Yeah, no striking. Yeah it’s sport orientated (BJJ is at risk of going that way as well). Still, throwing dumb motherfuckers hard on solid ground is a fight stopper. Judoka like to say “nobody hits as hard as the Earth”
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:
“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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