As you can see, it differs from the traditional programming. I have decreased the load but increased the time and also allowed for a short break between each repetition. Again, the numbers above are based on experience and they may differ for other athletes. I found this range of time, rest and reps very effective when introducing TUT for the first time. I wouldn't use it more than 2x a year for big exercises like squat and bench press. I haven’t used it for deadlifts and would not recommend doing so, as I personally think it puts too much stress on the back.
Develop your mental game. When you start competing, learn to block out the losses and the wins alike. Always look forward to your next fight, pausing only briefly to consider your victories and your failures in the ring. Dwelling on your past fights is only good for learning what you can do better and how you can improve to increase your chances of being victorious in your next fight.
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Our MMA classes are open all levels of experience.  The  format is primarily learning the technical aspects of MMA with little live training and no sparring.  All serious MMA fighters train in various specific disciplines. These usually include Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, and others.  Today, some gyms and martial arts schools teach pieces of these various arts and call it MMA Training.  In our classes we focus on techniques specific to MMA. An example is controlling an opponent against the cage.  Our cirriculum is based on techniques and methods used by Renzo Gracie’s world class team.

Since 2007, there have been six fatalities in mixed martial arts matches. The first was the death of Sam Vasquez on November 30, 2007.[182] Vasquez collapsed shortly after being knocked out by Vince Libardi in the third round of an October 20, 2007 fight at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas.[181] Vasquez had two separate surgeries to remove blood clots from his brain, and shortly after the second operation suffered a stroke and did not regain consciousness.[182]
I would stick to a beginner routine, as the BIGGEST difference in my book between a beginner routine and the more advanced is form. Proper form is critical, as this not only can help prevent injuries, but you actually get more out of your workout with proper form. Additionally, you're giving your central nervous system time to adjust; jumping into a more advanced routine can cause problems.

“I like the format of the classes, and the open gym time afterwards. Everyone has been helpful and approachable, and the atmosphere feels good. For someone who has had no martial arts background, Warrior’s Cove has been a great way to get started. From the moment I walked in, I feel like I’m being encouraged to do my best without being pressured to do more than I am able. In addition to learning self-defense, I have also seen improvements in muscle tone and my heart rate.”

Camron, thanks for the message. I would say that the number one priority would be skill development. Drilling, learning the technical aspects of striking and grappling. The S&C simply compliments the skill development, so 2-3 workouts per week is plenty. Stick to learning the basics of squatting, hinging, pushing, pulling and carrying heavy loads. Your success will come from lng term consistency, not short term intensity, so be patient, don’t overdo it and over time you will improve.


Sambo is a Russian martial art, combat sport and self-defense system.[119] It is a mixture of Judo and Freestyle Wrestling using a Keikogi known as Kurtka. Sambo focuses on throwing, takedowns, grappling, and includes submissions from Judo and Catch Wrestling. Sambo also has a modality known as Combat Sambo, which adds punches, kicks, elbows and knees, making it a proto-MMA hybrid fighting style. Sambo is popular in Russia and eastern Europe, where it is taught as a complement to Judo and Wrestling training, Sambo also provides a good base for MMA with all-around skills for combining grappling and striking. Some notable Sambo fighters that transitioned into MMA include: Fedor Emelianenko, Igor Vovchanchyn, Oleg Taktarov and Khabib Nurmagomedov.
Fighting professionally for 18 years has made the 40-year-old Jackson smarter about his training. Over time, “Rampage” has learned that he can’t do without basic moves like pushups. He does a ton of them, logging anywhere from 100 to 200 per session in 25-rep installments. Jackson has found them useful for giving him strength towards the end of fights. “It’s really important to lift your own body weight for some reason,” Jackson says. “You want to have that conditioning strength to where you’re strong the whole fight. You don’t just want to be strong in the beginning. You want to be strong even at the end of the fight.”
Using a completely scientific approach to weight training progression, a cycle will be designed to meet your needs. For example, a Hypertrophy phase will increase cross sectional area of the muscle. A Maximum Strength phase will increase recruitment and strength of the muscle. The Power Transfer phase will help those who wish to increase the pure speed of their actions and the Competition phase to increase your strength, power, size, and speed throughout your “in-season”.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Look for a gym in your area that specializes in mixed martial arts. Learning to fight properly in the cage will take more than learning a bunch of martial arts individually and then picking a fight. You've got to learn to put it all together and train with other MMA fighters, sparring, learning, and developing your skills. You'll learn the basics and have a good resource in the community that gathers around these types of gyms.
Armed or unarmed - what type of combat altercation are you faced with? Is your opponent armed or unarmed? For example, in street fighting, what type or weapon is the assailant holding (i.e. handgun, knife, baseball bat or heavy chain). Avoid using flexible weapons (chains, belts, key chains, etc.) in a real street fight. For example, some self defense instructors advocate using a kubotan as a flexible weapon by flailing the key portion across an attacker's face. Such flexible weapons are ineffective for fighting in the streets. Here are some reasons why:

I have been participating in Easton's BJJ program for over two years, and it has been a consistently positive influence in my life since I began.  I have seen vast improvements in both my fitness level, emotional well-being, and overall discipline in all things that I do.  I truly enjoy both the coaching and the community that are offered at Easton. Highly recommended!
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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