Portal thinks some fighters lack a certain “quality of movements”. He helps McGregor tackle certain issues that may arise in the crux of combat, providing guidance on when to use “peripheral vision versus focused vision,” and helping him “have more efficient movements and more quality patterns”. Portal says of his training with McGregor: “We’re using gymnastics rings, we’re using a lot of very difficult quadrupedal movements to create that strength and durability.”
Entirely valid, but that aside, what would be worth learning for practical purposes? Being this small is a pain in the ass and I’d like to at least not die in some random encounter that I didn’t manage to avoid. I’m sure if you put yourself in my shoes for a second you might understand why it would get old to be completely defenseless. I suppose I could get a gun but those can always be taken away.
I would stick to a beginner routine, as the BIGGEST difference in my book between a beginner routine and the more advanced is form. Proper form is critical, as this not only can help prevent injuries, but you actually get more out of your workout with proper form. Additionally, you're giving your central nervous system time to adjust; jumping into a more advanced routine can cause problems.
You have fourteen body weapons or street fighting techniques that you have at your disposal at all times. When properly executed these techniques have the capacity to disable, cripple and even kill your criminal adversary. Keep in mind that whenever you use physical force against another person in a street fight you must be absolutely certain that your actions are legally warranted and justified in the eyes of the law. Therefore, you should have a fundamental understanding of the law so you will know when it's appropriate to use force against another person in a fight. Moreover, you will also need to know how much physical force can be applied in a fight without facing excessive force charges. To learn more about these street fighting techniques see armed to the teeth volume 1 and volume 2.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

best fight program

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