The first documented use of the name mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg, in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when the website newfullcontact.com, then one of the biggest covering the sport, hosted and reprinted the article. The first use of the term by a promotion was in September 1995 by Rick Blume, president and CEO of Battlecade Extreme Fighting, just after UFC 7.[47] UFC official Jeff Blatnick was responsible for the Ultimate Fighting Championship officially adopting the name mixed martial arts. It was previously marketed as "Ultimate Fighting" and "No Holds Barred (NHB)", until Blatnick and John McCarthy proposed the name "MMA" at the UFC 17 rules meeting in response to increased public criticism.[48] The question as to who actually coined the name is still in debate.[3]
Movement training prizes a combination of mindfulness, timing and precision drills that are seemingly arbitrary – like catching wooden sticks or marauding on all-fours like a panther – and seeks to optimize one’s spacial awareness while in a fight. The training is said to help fighters navigate the rigors of combat with a sixth sense – meant distinctly for hyper-alertness – and if seized on properly, can endow an air of supreme of calm.

10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
During moderate to high intensities, lactic acid and hydrogen ions begin to accumulate as the supply of oxygen does not match the demands of the working muscles - this is the byproduct of the anaerobic energy system. However, another byproduct of this energy system is lactate (mistakenly called lactic acid by the general population). Lactate is closely correlated with fatigue, however: correlation does not imply causation. Lactate is the 4th type of fuel that can be used to restore energy, primarily happening within the mitochondria of cells - the same location aerobic metabolism takes place.
Don’t look now, but Jackson and Silva share a similar pushup regimen. But while Jackson knocks them out to improve his strength for the end of fights, Silva includes them in his workouts for a different reason. “To push the guy,” he says. “To create space.” That created space could be crucial for when fighters get tangled up in the cage because that earned distance could be just enough real estate for Silva to throw a heavy blow or strike with his knees.

The JetBlue TrueBlue program best serves travelers based in East Coast cities (like Boston, New York City and Fort Lauderdale and Orlando, Florida) who primarily fly domestically and to the Caribbean. Members earn points for every dollar spent on JetBlue flights and JetBlue Vacations packages. You can also earn points on flights booked with seven partner airlines, as well as on hotel stays, car rentals and purchases with retail partners like Amazon and through the ShopTrue retail portal. Earn even more points by staying connected on social media and by making purchases with one of the JetBlue credit cards from MasterCard. You can use those points to cover the cost of future air travel on JetBlue or Hawaiian Airlines, as well as the cost of JetBlue Vacations packages.
Solutions offered by Fit To Fight® include, but are not limited to, active and passive measures not meant only to “harden” targets, but rather to create zones less likely to be seen as targets. This will be accomplished by employing a series of measures making these “zones” less appealing to potential assailants. Fit To Fight®’s Active Killer Defense™ is designed as a dynamic training modality, involving physical defensive tactics training, realistic scenario training, and lectures. The end goal is to create safer and more secure schools, businesses, churches and communities.
Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.

What is it? The term kickboxing has become kind of a blanket term to cover anything that involves punching and kicking, but Muay Thai has a few distinct features. It’s a centuries-old practice that comes, predictably, from Thailand. In addition to fists and feet, it also involves knee and elbow strikes as well as a form of stand-up grappling called clinch.
If you are a fan of MMA since its inception, you have had a front row seat to the birth and evolution of what we consider the greatest sport in the world; one that has lineage to ancient Greek Olympics, almost 3,000 years ago, rooted in wrestling and boxing. Much like the natural selection process underlying evolution, these fans have witnessed different forms of the martial arts reign during certain eras. Fighters like Royce Gracie, Randy Couture, Chuck Liddell, Wanderlei Silva, and Anderson Silva all dominated with strategies heavily focused in BJJ, Wrestling, Kickboxing, and Muay Thai.

Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.


There are two primary training methods in this phase: random flowing and sparring. In random flowing there is a level of cooperation, where practitioners are helping each other to learn with a level of give-and-take. Specific goals may be worked on. In sparring, practitioners are only indirectly helping each other to learn. The focus of sparring is on beating your opponent in live training.
Mixed martial arts appear everywhere. For example, mixed martial arts events and personalities appear in just about every magazine such as GQ, Newsweek, Time, Playboy as well as smaller publications like Black Belt Magazine (for a complete list of mixed martial arts magazines, see my list below). Mixed martial arts also frequently appear in television shows, xbox games and movies. Mixed martial arts have their reality TV shows such as Tapout, The Ultimate Fighter and Caged that focus exclusively on the life of mixed martial arts personalities. Mixed martial arts also have their own unique workout gear and clothing line such as Tapout, Bad Boy MMA, Affliction, Cage Fighter and Xtreme Couture. For better or worse, it seems like mixed martial arts has taken over the world.
Boxing is a combat form that is widely used in MMA and is one of the primary striking bases for many fighters.[97] Boxing punches account for the vast majority of strikes during the stand up portion of a bout and also account for the largest number of significant strikes, knock downs and KOs in MMA matches.[98] Several aspects of boxing are extremely valuable such as footwork, combinations, and defensive techniques like slips, head movement and stance (including chin protection and keeping hands up) commonly known as the Guard position.[99] Boxing-based fighters have also been shown to throw and land a higher volume of strikes when compared with other striking bases, at a rate of 3.88 per minute with 9.64 per minute thrown (compared with Muay Thai at 3.46 and 7.50, respectively).[97] Fighters known for using boxing include Cain Velasquez, Nick Diaz, Junior dos Santos, B.J. Penn, Dan Hardy, Shane Carwin and Andrei Arlovski.
Trainer Martin Rooney, according to an article on T-nation.com written by Rooney and Bryan Krahn, advises against spending too much time trying to find the ultimate training program. He sees too many fighters attempting to copy a famous fighter's workout in an attempt to emulate them, doing the latest fitness craze or doing endless circuits until they throw up. In his experience, the top fighters and trainers do low volume work, basic strength training and sprint work along with their technical work. In his mind, the keys to a good program are technical work combined with basic strength training and sprinting while also ensuring you get enough rest.
Fuel your body right. MMA fighter Jon Manley recommends eating five clean meals per day, consisting of lean proteins, a variety of fruits and vegetables and unprocessed carbohydrates. Shop the outer rim of the grocery store to avoid the urge to purchase processed junk food that lurks on the inner-aisle shelves. Drink at least a gallon of water a day and drop your calories gradually if you need to lose weight.
Which makes sense, considering how MMA fighters train to survive three five-minute rounds of non-stop, full-body attacks from people who want nothing more than to beat them into submission. To go the distance, they have to be in peak condition: panther-like speed, incredible stamina, and serious strength. Even for those of us with no intention of stepping into the ring, MMA-style training can be a terrific addition to any fitness regime.

In February 2016, Michelle and Robert King, when asked about a spin-off, stated that there was a possibility for a spin-off series.[23] In May 2016, CBS was in final negotiations to set up a spin-off featuring Christine Baranski reprising her role as Diane Lockhart, but which would air on CBS All Access instead of the network.[4] The spin-off was officially ordered to series on May 18, with Cush Jumbo returning as well.[7] In September 2016, it was confirmed that the 10 episode spin-off would premiere in February 2017, with the story picking up a year after the final episode of the original series and seeing Diane pushed out of her firm after a financial scam involving her mentee wipes out her savings, resulting in her move to Lucca Quinn's firm.[2] The series was initially planned to air in May 2017, but was moved to February 2017 after production delays forced CBS to postpone the premiere of the new series, Star Trek: Discovery.[3] After months of speculation, CBS revealed the title for the spin-off series, which was revealed to be The Good Fight, on October 31, 2016.[24] It was announced that The Good Fight would premiere on February 19, 2017.[1] CBS released the first trailer for the spinoff on December 18, 2016, featuring footage from the premiere and later episodes.[25]


Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.

NSAC chairman Anthony A. Marnell III: “We will be releasing the Jon Jones tests, but we will not do that until sometime very, very close to the night of the fight. So if you could stop requesting that data from the executive director, it would be helpful because it’s not going to come out until we’re ready to send it out and have all of that properly put together – but it will be published before the fight.” h/t MMAjunkie


Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.
Maia Rindell arrives at her new firm trying to ignore multiple anonymous calls and texts from angry clients of her father, who swear revenge for the money he stole from them. She meets Julius Cain, a managing partner, and Lucca Quinn, a third year associate. Cain brings all the lower level associates to a local union headquarters to offer free legal advice as part of their retainer with the union. While there, Maia ends up taking the case of Frank Gwynn, a man who is unfairly having his wages garnished due to charges of theft from his place of work. Meanwhile, Diane is visited by Maia's mother, Lenore, who asks Diane to meet with her husband, Henry. Lenore claims that they are innocent of the charges, laying the blame on their business partner, Jax, Henry's brother.During arbitration, Maia loses the case, but Lucca steps in to accuse the company of false imprisonment, as they had detained Frank for seven hours to question him about the theft. When the firm decides that the case is too small to invest resources in, Lucca proposes that they open a class action lawsuit against multiple companies who have garnished wages after accusing their employees of theft. Meanwhile, Diane moves into her new office, assisted by Marissa Gold, who has been demoted at Diane's old firm. Marissa decides to help with the class action in hopes of being hired as Diane's new assistant. She tracks down multiple employees who have had their wages garnished and adds them to the suit. Grateful, Diane accepts Marissa as her new assistant. Diane meets with Henry in jail, who claims that Jax framed him to escape prosecution. Diane promises to look into the matter, and as they part ways, Henry mentions that Lenore has terminal breast cancer. At Frank's trial, the prosecution uncovers evidence that Frank had been involved in an earlier theft at a previous job, casting doubt on his story. Frank loses his case, and the loss causes the firm to pull out of the class action lawsuit.Maia learns of her mother's condition from Diane, and despite her lawyer's advice to stay away from her parents to avoid being caught up in their financial scandal, she visits her. However, Maia learns that her mother lied about the cancer so that she would come see her. Although angry at her mother, Diane advises Maia to forgive her, since she is obviously lonely with Henry in jail. Maia visits her mother to make amends, but discovers her mother carrying on an affair with her uncle Jax.

Unlike conventional self defense, extreme street fighting techniques are nuclear in nature and designed to immediately stop a criminal from continuing his unlawful deadly assault. Extreme street fighting techniques can possible cause severe injury or death and can only be used in life and death self defense situations! These self defense techniques are not designed for sport combat, tournament competition or any self defense situation that does not justifiably legally warrant the application of deadly force.
In his instructional book, Anderson Silva admitted the influence of taekwondo in the formation of his unique style. In each of my fights, I tried to utilize techniques from all the various styles I had studied. I threw taekwondo kicks. I threw Muay Thai knees and elbows, and I used my knowledge of Brazilian jiu-jitsu on the ground.[117] Anthony Pettis has also stated that he is definitely a traditional martial artist first and a mixed martial artist second,[115] as well as his style of attacking is different [because of his] taekwondo background.[118]
Maia Rindell arrives at her new firm trying to ignore multiple anonymous calls and texts from angry clients of her father, who swear revenge for the money he stole from them. She meets Julius Cain, a managing partner, and Lucca Quinn, a third year associate. Cain brings all the lower level associates to a local union headquarters to offer free legal advice as part of their retainer with the union. While there, Maia ends up taking the case of Frank Gwynn, a man who is unfairly having his wages garnished due to charges of theft from his place of work. Meanwhile, Diane is visited by Maia's mother, Lenore, who asks Diane to meet with her husband, Henry. Lenore claims that they are innocent of the charges, laying the blame on their business partner, Jax, Henry's brother.During arbitration, Maia loses the case, but Lucca steps in to accuse the company of false imprisonment, as they had detained Frank for seven hours to question him about the theft. When the firm decides that the case is too small to invest resources in, Lucca proposes that they open a class action lawsuit against multiple companies who have garnished wages after accusing their employees of theft. Meanwhile, Diane moves into her new office, assisted by Marissa Gold, who has been demoted at Diane's old firm. Marissa decides to help with the class action in hopes of being hired as Diane's new assistant. She tracks down multiple employees who have had their wages garnished and adds them to the suit. Grateful, Diane accepts Marissa as her new assistant. Diane meets with Henry in jail, who claims that Jax framed him to escape prosecution. Diane promises to look into the matter, and as they part ways, Henry mentions that Lenore has terminal breast cancer. At Frank's trial, the prosecution uncovers evidence that Frank had been involved in an earlier theft at a previous job, casting doubt on his story. Frank loses his case, and the loss causes the firm to pull out of the class action lawsuit.Maia learns of her mother's condition from Diane, and despite her lawyer's advice to stay away from her parents to avoid being caught up in their financial scandal, she visits her. However, Maia learns that her mother lied about the cancer so that she would come see her. Although angry at her mother, Diane advises Maia to forgive her, since she is obviously lonely with Henry in jail. Maia visits her mother to make amends, but discovers her mother carrying on an affair with her uncle Jax.
Regarding Vo2 max training, how is it possible to go all out for 3min. I’m a minute in and exhausted. I’ve either used a 15lbs medicine ball slam exercise or a 50lbs medicine ball pick up, squat, overhead press movement for 1min, then rest 1min and repeat for 5 sets. I’m done after that. Is my workload too heavy, am I not resting enough between sets? I bought the 8weeks Out book but am still confused on this interval scheme.
When many MMA fighters train, they keep the length of a standard five minute round in mind by doing circuit training.  MMA fighters need to get used to pushing themselves for five minute periods of time just like rounds in fights.  So, they organize their workouts into five minute periods with short rests in between.  For, example, a fighter might jump rope for five minutes, take 30 seconds to rest, shadow box for five minutes, take 30 seconds of rest, and then run on a treadmill for five more minutes.  This example would help a fighter simulate a three-round fight.
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