“I would recommend Warriors Cove to anyone who wants to learn a very effective system of self defense.  I have over 20 years of Martial Arts training and a black belt in Tae kwon do.  Out of all my years of training I attended many different schools and have had 19 instructors.  Based on my previous experiences I can honestly say that the head instructor of Warriors Cove, David Arnebeck, is not only one of the most skilled martial artists I have trained under, but he is also the best instructor I have ever had.  Mr. Arnebeck is very patient and takes the time to make sure his students understand every technique.  The training environment is safe, clean and there are no attitudes by other students.  My favorite aspect of the school is the training in Brazilian Jujitsu which is a very effective defense and a great workout.  The training is well rounded and includes stand up striking and throws.  I highly recommend this school to both the experienced martial artist and also those with no prior experience.”

Pride is Fit to Fight®’s exclusive kids training program. This program provides an enriching, safe and unique martial arts experience designed solely for children. Pride offers kids an exciting and varied curriculum, exposing kids to Muay Thai, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Krav Maga, sports conditioning and more! This program allows kids to be well-rounded martial artists and community members. Pride is based on the coming together of the emotional and physical needs that are actually manifest in the lives of our children today as opposed to watered down promises often mistakenly associated with Traditional Martial Arts, that are so rarely delivered.
We fight for great public schools, for economic opportunity and security. We fight for healthcare so nobody is one illness away from bankruptcy and for a secure retirement. We fight for our democracy and for a society that is safe, welcoming and sane and that means fighting against hatred and bigotry in all forms. We fight for jobs, justice and freedom for all.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
Comprehensive and well laid-out, with hundreds of tips such as grappling your way into a dominant kesa-gatame position to force your adversary's submission or knowing when to fight "dirty" to attack your opponent's vulnerabilities, this manual will give you a leg-up for everything from a no-holds-barred street fight to the regimented rules of fighting in the ring. With over 700 color photos and an instructional DVD that demonstrate all the right moves, this book gives you the winning edge you need!
I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.
If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims. 

Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
Trainer Martin Rooney, according to an article on T-nation.com written by Rooney and Bryan Krahn, advises against spending too much time trying to find the ultimate training program. He sees too many fighters attempting to copy a famous fighter's workout in an attempt to emulate them, doing the latest fitness craze or doing endless circuits until they throw up. In his experience, the top fighters and trainers do low volume work, basic strength training and sprint work along with their technical work. In his mind, the keys to a good program are technical work combined with basic strength training and sprinting while also ensuring you get enough rest.
If we ever decide to start naming these awards, The Robbies may be an appropriate start, as it seems that Mr. Robbie Lawler is always a fixture in the Best Fight category. His January win over Carlos Condit is the latest example of his action-packed brilliance, and the fact that we’re still talking about it in December shows you just how good this five-round war was.

Horrible workout. Clearly not designed by someone training ANY martial arts. Too many bodybuilding esque isolation exercises. Waaaaay to much shoulder work especially AFTER benching !! Shrugs ??!?! Most useless exercise in the book? Any MMA fighter should be periodising ther workouts anyway as there's too much to do at once". As your sport requires FULL BODY MOVEMENTS, you should stick to olympic lifts + bench + pull ups + sprints.

Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.


When performed to the limits, VO2 max intervals will take a lot out of you and are not easy on the body so it’s important to do them no more than once or twice per week. If you’ve got an upcoming fight, you’ll want to use fight specific drills for these intervals as much as possible. Fortunately, the changes that occur in the heart as a result of this intense cardiac work generally last at least 10-14 days even after you stop doing them so you can let yourself recover during the week leading up to a fight and still see the benefits of these intense intervals.
Other fighters may use the clinch to push their opponent against the cage or ropes, where they can effectively control their opponent's movement and restrict mobility while striking them with punches to the body or stomps also known as dirty boxing or "Wall and Maul". Randy Couture used his Greco Roman wrestling background to popularize this style en route to six title reigns in the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[142]
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
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