Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.
Tip– An important component of deliberate practice is to continually receive performance feedback. So watch yourself in the mirror for immediate feedback, and film yourself shadow-boxing and working the bag. Spend some time with your coach reviewing video will allow you to make any necessary corrections based on the feedback from the coach. Accept the feedback and integrate it into the practice, then get back to shadow-boxing.
To determine your overtraining status and your improving fitness, take your heart rate every morning. I strongly recommend a heart rate monitor, but if you do not have one, take your heart rate at your wrist, not your neck. Remember you need a clock or timer that measures seconds. Take the heart rate for a full minute every morning after you get up and go to the bathroom, but before you do anything else. Make sure you are sitting. Record the number every day, and if it is increases by more than five beats per minute you are probably overtraining or getting sick.
Onnit Academy is the most comprehensive database of information related to Unconventional Training, a unique new form of fitness methodology that focuses on functional strength, conditioning, and agility using the most efficient means and tools possible. The online database includes articles, videos, tutorials, and workouts featuring alternative implements like kettlebells, sandbags, steel maces, steel clubs, battle ropes, and more.
"I’m laughin’, but it’s nothing to joke about. We’re all part of the problem, all of us are. When an interim title is given, and the media makes a big fuss of it and a fighter makes a big fuss of it and a fan makes a big fuss of it, an interim title has value. That’s the saddest thing that can happen in the sport. Because an interim title is given in replacement for money. ‘We don’t wanna give you money, but well give you an interim title. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you a main event spot. We don’t wanna give you money, but we’ll give you that opponent you want. We’ll give you everything… but what you deserve. And that’s money. That’s sad, it’s sad. And when that’s valued, an interim title is valued by fans, by the media, by the promotion and everyone, it’s a sick joke. And it should be laughed at and it should no longer be applauded and it should be booed. And when it is, it’ll be a happy day. Fighters get paid more, fans will be more educated, and promotions will stop the bull$#[email protected]" h/t BJPenn.com • Watch
It wasn't until 1993 when mixed martial arts were first introduced to the United States through the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC), a mixed martial arts promotional company. The UFC showcased various mixed martial arts athletes fighting each other without weight classes and very few few rules, by boxing standards it was a bloodsport where just about "anything goes". In 1995 United States Senator John McCain called mixed martial arts "human cockfighting," and demanded that MMA be regulated by an athletic commission. Senator McCain's destain for mixed martial arts was well known after his remark, “MMA appeals to the lowest common denominator in our society."

Along with peanut butter and jelly, mixed martial arts (MMA for short) is proof positive awesome things happen when worlds collide. MMA takes different fighting disciplines — boxing, Jiu-Jitsu, wrestling, you name it — and combines them into an unpredictable combat system. Contenders can mix and match elements from literally any martial art on Earth, and the result is a tough, intense sport and a kick-ass workout.

“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”
UFC Gym lives up to their motto “Train Different” by providing classes that combine strength training with cardiovascular conditioning. Instead of conventional cardio, you’ll push sleds, flip tires, and slam sand bags in their Daily Ultimate Training class. Modeled on high-intensity interval training, these taxing bouts of work and short recovery periods strengthen your cardiovascular capacity and torch calories long after you leave the gym. 
Robert and Michelle King serve as showrunners and executive producers of the series, which they co-created with Phil Alden Robinson. Ridley Scott, David W. Zucker, Liz Glotzer, and Brooke Kennedy also serve as executive producers. The series is produced by CBS Television Studios in association with Scott Free Productions and King Size Productions. The series is distributed worldwide by CBS Studios International.
Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.

The FRONTIER Miles program caters to travelers based in Denver and the Midwest who frequently fly within the United States. Frontier Airlines services major domestic airports – like those in Atlanta, Los Angeles and Chicago – as well as smaller destinations like Sioux Falls, South Dakota; Fargo, North Dakota; and Bozeman, Montana. Frontier also offers flights to various destinations throughout Mexico, the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico. The FRONTIER Miles program awards miles based on the airport-to-airport air mileage distance flown. Miles earned can be used for free flights, car rentals and magazine subscriptions. FRONTIER Miles members can also earn miles when staying at certain hotels, purchasing services through partner merchants and charging everyday expenses to the Frontier Airlines World Mastercard credit card by Barclays.
The style is used by fighters well-versed in submission defense and skilled at takedowns. They take the fight to the ground, maintain a grappling position, and strike until their opponent submits or is knocked out. Although not a traditional style of striking, the effectiveness and reliability of ground-and-pound has made it a popular tactic. It was first demonstrated as an effective technique by Mark Coleman, then popularized by fighters such as Chael Sonnen, Don Frye, Frank Trigg, Jon Jones, Cheick Kongo, Mark Kerr, Frank Shamrock, Tito Ortiz, Matt Hughes, Chris Weidman, and especially Khabib Nurmagomedov.[126]
The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”
Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.
World Mixed Martial Arts Association (WMMAA) was founded in 2012 in Monaco by M-1 Global commercial promoters and is under the leadership of the General Secretary Alexander Endelgarth, President Finkelstein and Fedor Emelianenko.[156][157][158][159] The World MMA Association is an organization that manages and develops mixed martial arts, it establishes rules and procedures and hosts MMA competitions. World MMA Association includes national MMA organizations, representing the sport and registered in accordance with national laws.

An English degree means you are adaptable, and are not limited to a single career path. While writing and publishing are direct ways to fight racism, most English majors are not authors. You can become a teacher of literature, writing, or even English as a second language. You can be an advocate, working in charities for underserved populations, and refugee aid programs. You can take your English degree and use it to pursue a law degree, ultimately becoming a civil rights or immigration lawyer.


The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.
For the best results, try 2-3 plyo sessions per week along with your resistance-training regimen. Just make sure to give yourself about 48 hours of rest in between plyo sessions to allow for full recovery. Some great plyometric exercises for MMA fighters include plyo push-ups, single-arm throws, side throws, jump squats, bounding, and lateral high hops.

Train your power endurance by performing explosive exercises of a moderate load for about 30-45 seconds (or 15-20 reps), resting for 30 seconds, and repeating for 5 rounds. Circuit training is another great option. But, it's critical to remember that your intervals should be at least 30 seconds long. After all, you'll goal should be to make it through at least a least one three-minute round!

Unfortunately, many MMA gyms tend to be unreasonably dangerous. During our 40+ years of testing we have identified a wide range of methods for guarding your safety in training! Even if your goal is MMA Sport Fighting, you want to remain as healthy as possible so you can compete at your full potential! At the Warrior’s Cove, we correct this common mistake of MMA training!


Education is the greatest weapon against ignorance. By studying education and becoming an educator, you have the ability to arm the next generation of Americans with knowledge and to instill in them the critical capacities to fight racism themselves. You can help stop the spread of ignorance, and simultaneously, create new allies in the march of progress.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]

Previously, Japan-based organization Pride Fighting Championships held an opening 10-minute round followed by two five-minute rounds. Stomps, soccer kicks and knees to the head of a grounded opponent are legal, but elbow strikes to the head are not.[81] This rule set is more predominant in the Asian-based organizations as opposed to European and American rules. More recently, Singapore-based organization ONE Championship allows soccer kicks and knees to the head of a grounded opponent as well as elbow strikes to the head, but does not allow head stomps.[82]
Regarding Vo2 max training, how is it possible to go all out for 3min. I’m a minute in and exhausted. I’ve either used a 15lbs medicine ball slam exercise or a 50lbs medicine ball pick up, squat, overhead press movement for 1min, then rest 1min and repeat for 5 sets. I’m done after that. Is my workload too heavy, am I not resting enough between sets? I bought the 8weeks Out book but am still confused on this interval scheme.
For combat sports, tempo intervals can be applied in many different forms, ranging from general activities like the sprints that Francis used, to more specific drills such as hitting the heavy bag or doing pad work. The important thing is that the intensity of the work intervals is kept at 75% or less of your maximum with the duration no more than 12-15 seconds. You can rest between intervals for 1 minute or until your heart rate comes down to 130-135, whichever comes first.
Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
Some MMA promotions tend to exist more to build up prospects while others have a good mix of prospects and veterans.[60] Some exist only to be feeder leagues to the bigger promotions (e.g. LFA, CWFC),[61] others exist to try to be the best in the world (e.g. ACB, ONE Championship).[62][63] Some promotions only do four shows a year while others are doing them monthly.
6) Training MMA fulfills mans need for physical expression aka violence. We don't want violence in our daily lives but we still yearn for physicality. We all get pumped up seeing fights in movies or TV or when we hear about someone who was accosted by thugs and kicked the crap out of the them. Training MMA is a perfect middle ground. You can train (or fight) in controlled areas and release aggression with no threat of repercussions, jail time, murder etc..
Learning how to street fight with the skill and confidence of a sesoned fighter is something that can certainly be achieved. As a matter of fact, I have dedicated my entire live to teaching law abiding people how to defend and protect themselves in the streets. However, I have to tell you from the start that it's not such and easy task; it will require a bit of dedication on your part. But, if you are willing to do some serious studying as well as some practical self-defense training you could learn the skills necessary to win a street fight. 
Before I show you any actual fighting techniques, you need a posture or stance that will maximize your offensive techniques and provide defensive protection. In my Contemporary Fighting Arts, I teach my students a broad scope of strategic stances that protect your center line during a street fight. But for purposes of this how to article, I will only address the fighting stance. But, in order to better appreciate the fighting stance you should have a basic understanding of the center line theory. Basically, the center line is an imaginary vertical line that divides your body in half. Located on this line are some of your most vital anatomical targets that you must protect in a street fight. These targets include the eyes, nose, chin, throat, solar plexus and groin. Your center line is best protected by using a fighting stance that strategically position your targets away from direct hits.
As of December 2013 WMMAA has 38 member states under its umbrella, in 2017 World MMA Association has 83 members: Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Colombia, Czech Republic, France, Guatemala, Georgia, Greece, India, Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela.[160]
Phoenix welcomes owner of Trooper Fitness Studio, Prince Brathwaite and certified personal trainer and former competitive bodybuilder, Albert Gonzalez to the podcast. In part one of this two part series, the three preach the importance of having a fitness plan and believing in the numbers. With decades of fitness experience between them, Prince and Albert shed light on the importance of rest and recovery, the difference between training for health, sport or ideal body and what the formula is for each. Learn how to set your fitness goals in episode 67 of In Fighting Shape.
To determine your overtraining status and your improving fitness, take your heart rate every morning. I strongly recommend a heart rate monitor, but if you do not have one, take your heart rate at your wrist, not your neck. Remember you need a clock or timer that measures seconds. Take the heart rate for a full minute every morning after you get up and go to the bathroom, but before you do anything else. Make sure you are sitting. Record the number every day, and if it is increases by more than five beats per minute you are probably overtraining or getting sick.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
MMA fighters train brutally hard to compete in their sport. Their workouts vary widely between working on skill-sets, extreme conditioning, and strength training. Some fighters also learn the hard way that it is possible to over-train for a fight, if you can believe it.  Fighting might come from some of the earliest most instinctual place of human evolution, but modern fighters have taken training and preparation to whole new levels.
"Our mission at HBO Sports is to elevate the brand. We look for television projects that are high-profile, high-access, and highly ambitious in the stories they seek to tell and the quality of production in telling them," HBO Sports said in a statement. "Boxing has been part of our heritage for decades. During that time, the sport has undergone a transformation. It is now widely available on a host of networks and streaming services. There is more boxing than ever being televised and distributed. In some cases, this programming is very good. But from an entertainment point of view, it's not unique.
Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
My experience at Warrior’s Cove has been profound. After three and one half years of training, the effects on my life are obvious. My fitness level has increased dramatically. I am much more flexible, have better endurance and health of the cardiovascular system. I also have better posture and have seen great improvements in balance. The most powerful change has been in my mind. The focus that I have acquired through the repetition of movements and the will to improve has been a potent ingredient in my growth. I am able to concentrate and relax under difficult circumstances. This is a great tool for dealing with stress and anxiety. I am more confident but also have better control of my ego. All of these factors have contributed to me making better life choices for health and family.”
Learning how to street fight with the skill and confidence of a sesoned fighter is something that can certainly be achieved. As a matter of fact, I have dedicated my entire live to teaching law abiding people how to defend and protect themselves in the streets. However, I have to tell you from the start that it's not such and easy task; it will require a bit of dedication on your part. But, if you are willing to do some serious studying as well as some practical self-defense training you could learn the skills necessary to win a street fight. 
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