MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”
Proper weight distribution is another important factor. When squared off with your opponent, always try to maintain a fifty percent weight distribution. This non committal weight distribution will provide you with the ability to move in any direction quickly and efficiently. At the same time, it will provide you with the necessary stability to withstand and defend against various
One of the most important aspects of mixed martial arts training is cardio-vascular training for stamina.  As fighters bounce around the ring like boxers, engage in grappling and wrestle to the ground, the necessity for premier conditioning is obvious. Boxers go 12 rounds so cardio is more important than strength. When two fighters are engaged, or grappling each other for a dominant position the constant use of their muscles leads to extreme fatigue. As a result MMA fighters spend lots of time on cardio. Many of the same cardio exercises that are used for boxing are used by MMA fighters.  This includes the basics like jogging and jumping rope, to biking, swimming and pretty much any other kind of fitness machine you would find in your local gym.
Oh really? I know several females who have taken on males in our gym, and the sport is not manly it is EMPOWERING. Get in the cage with a real female fighter maybe like Ronda, or Holly. See how you do then. As an MMA fighter it is surprising how ignorant you are, most fighters have open minds, and believe we are ALL ONE. TRUE FIGHTERS AT HEART. Which you are not, obviously.
At UFC 232 Megan Anderson threw a high kick at Zingano and her toe made impact on the eye; it rendered Zingano was unable to defend herself, and she lost. Zingano argued to CSAC that a finger poke to the eye would have led to an NC or conceivably a DQ win, so a toe should too. However, there is no toe prohibition, as human's don't have comparable dexterity with their toes, so the petition to overturn was denied, but ED Andy Foster, said an addendum will be developed to more specifically address the issue. Zingano is adamant that there be changes: “I’d have a baby 10 times before I’d do that again. I thought I lost my eye. I thought if I opened my eye that it was going to spill out on to my face. ... It scared me, and I’m not willing to lose an eye for this sport. ... If they don’t make a rule on it, it’s open season on eye pokes. I’ve got mad dexterity with my toes, so if you’re telling me we get to just aim for people’s eyeballs with our toes now, that’s not really safe moving forward, but we’ll all find a way to win. If you put me in something on the ground, and I get to dig my toes into your eyes, too, that’s kind of gnarly, but we’re in there trying to survive. Me or you, man.” h/t MMAjunkie
As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]
Since 2007, there have been six fatalities in mixed martial arts matches. The first was the death of Sam Vasquez on November 30, 2007.[182] Vasquez collapsed shortly after being knocked out by Vince Libardi in the third round of an October 20, 2007 fight at the Toyota Center in Houston, Texas.[181] Vasquez had two separate surgeries to remove blood clots from his brain, and shortly after the second operation suffered a stroke and did not regain consciousness.[182]
Boxers undergo some of the most intense training to prepare for just minutes in the ring. Sure, lifting weights and running endless miles will do the trick, but lets be real, nothing feels better than sweating it out like a true badass. Treadmills and stairmasters are child’s play in comparison to banging out a few rounds of speed rope or deadly one-two combinations.
While mixed martial arts was initially practiced almost exclusively by competitive fighters, this is no longer the case. As the sport has become more mainstream and more widely taught, it has become accessible to wider range of practitioners of all ages. Proponents of this sort of training argue that it is safe for anyone, of any age, with varying levels of competitiveness and fitness.[95][96]

I am currently a college student and am working on a project where I have to plan an entire year of training for an MMA fighter. It needs to include when the fighter should peak, what types of workouts and why, should they do aerobic or anaerobic workouts, overload, progression, etc. If you could point me in the right direction to research this project I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much!
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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