This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.
This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:
“I am a huge fan of BJJ and MMA so this chance for me to learn what I have seen is very very cool. It is an honor to be taught by you after learning so much about your martial arts history and your practice under Rickson. The Warrior’s Cove is, in my opinion, the only place to go for martial arts training. Everything is very practical due to it being based on real life scenarios. I have learned so much in just the 4 weeks I have been there. I have a very demanding job (Senior Loan Officer) and I am almost always able to work around my schedule because of the class availability. I think whether you are a beginner looking for self defense skills or you want to expand on past martial art experiences, the Warrior’s Cove has what you are looking for. Thank you Dave for everything! I look forward to my future with the Cove and getting a Black Belt from you or Rickson himself!”
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu (BJJ) is a complete fighting system that teaches you how to control and subdue your opponent. You learn not only how to immobilize an opponent effectively so they can’t attack you, but also how to defeat them humanely without having to seriously hurt them. It’s the only proven style where a smaller person can immobilize and defeat a stronger, larger attacker.
What is it? The term kickboxing has become kind of a blanket term to cover anything that involves punching and kicking, but Muay Thai has a few distinct features. It’s a centuries-old practice that comes, predictably, from Thailand. In addition to fists and feet, it also involves knee and elbow strikes as well as a form of stand-up grappling called clinch. 

What? Self defence is for everyone no matter the gender and size or height. I have experienced bullying in shape and form even domestic violence. I do four styles of mma and I train with men in my dojo and I am respected and treated as an equal because I can fight. It won’t matter where anyone moves to. Trouble and danger is everywhere. Offenders attack those who can’t defend themselves and don’t matter what area you’re from or visiting.


Offering men�s programs, women�s programs and youth programs, from kickboxing and self-defense to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, our selection will fit the needs of beginners to advanced students. Elite MMA schools includes four facilities conveniently located around the greater Houston area and offer weekday, night and weekend classes taught by certified and caring instructors. We offer a complimentary private lesson to potential members and tours of our facilities, come see why Elite MMA is the right school for you.

^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
These fighters will often study submission wrestling to avoid being forced into submission should they find themselves on the ground. This style can be deceptively different from traditional kickboxing styles, since sprawl-and-brawlers must adapt their techniques to incorporate takedown and ground fighting defense. A few notable examples are Igor Vovchanchyn, Mirko Filipović, Chuck Liddell, Mark Hunt and more recently Junior dos Santos, Andrei Arlovski.[124] and Joanna Jedrzejczyk.[125]
One of the most important aspects of mixed martial arts training is cardio-vascular training for stamina.  As fighters bounce around the ring like boxers, engage in grappling and wrestle to the ground, the necessity for premier conditioning is obvious. Boxers go 12 rounds so cardio is more important than strength. When two fighters are engaged, or grappling each other for a dominant position the constant use of their muscles leads to extreme fatigue. As a result MMA fighters spend lots of time on cardio. Many of the same cardio exercises that are used for boxing are used by MMA fighters.  This includes the basics like jogging and jumping rope, to biking, swimming and pretty much any other kind of fitness machine you would find in your local gym.
Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113]
This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4
For Regular Dudes: Try new things: basic, intelligent training that's tailored to your specific needs – not some celebrity's. That's the smartest option. "I give seminars all over the world, and I always ask the room who has flexibility issues," says Rooney. "Virtually everyone will raise their hand. Next, I ask whoever's working on it (flexibility) to keep your hands up. Maybe one or two are."
If you are interested in taking one or more classes at the Warrior’s Cove, you may visit to observe the classes. We have a seating area for visitors. You may also participate in one free class – in each program that we offer.  You will find our instructors and the other members to be friendly, informative, and supportive. Simply fill out the GET YOUR FREE TRIAL form above to get started today!
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential

Your shadow boxing should be set up in rounds with non-stop shadow boxing so that you can establish a good pace, similar to one you would have in a real life fighting situation. You could do two rounds of five minutes each, or if it’s a quick workout one round will be enough to get your body warm and loose. Some fighters find it beneficial to do more rounds and a shorter duration such as 30 seconds – one minute, with a 30 second break in between. Find the style that works best for you and execute. Another great way to warm up before stretching is jumping rope, many professional fighters/boxers swear up and down that jump roping helps establish a good fight flow.
Note that this workout is very simple. For example, you might ask, “Only three sets of pressing for the first workout?” Yes. Do not do more than mentioned. Sometimes volume is low to allow you to adjust to the new program or to allow for strategic deconditioning. Also, combat athletes are among the most prone to overtraining, especially if they are training in their skilled disciplines three or more times per week. Given that scenario, this workout will be perfectly adequate for results.
Marsden also makes it clear that bodyweight conditioning workouts are every bit as important for MMA training as throwing punches in the ring. “If there’s one thing for certain in this sport, it’s that your heart rate will change several times over the course of a five-minute round due to the many battle styles a fight can take. It may start as a boxing match, move into Olympic-level wrestling, then return back to the feet,” Marsden says.
Of course, no home-based MMA workout will completely mimic the adrenaline rush of getting in the cage with another fighter. If you're serious about training in mixed martial arts, you'll want to find a facility in your area with coaches who can help you acquire the specific skills needed to actually fight your way through three tough rounds. It's not just about punching hard or throwing a solid kick, you have to learn to grapple and wrestle, how to break out of holds, and how to take a punch without faltering. Home-based workouts can only take you so far.
Why 90 second intervals? 90 seconds is enough time to ensure that you use all of your anaerobic energy systems for each exercise. The body uses different systems at different times during exercise. The first seconds of exercise bouts relies on ATP storage, after a few seconds of contraction, the muscles moves on to ATP-PC, and then to the lactic acid system.
Also, keep in mind, we want to do this as a conditioning routine. This is a way to get into fighting shape, but not prepare for a fight. This routine, may or may not be good for an MMA fighter, honestly, I don’t know because I’m not one! What I do know is the following workout(s) are my answer to my own question, how do you develop the conditioning to go 25 minutes in the octagon?  So we develop and we progress.  Start with 3 minute rounds and we’ll work up to the 5.
Focus on fighting each and every day of the 30 days by training in some form or another. Exercise six days a week, with one day off to help you avoid overtraining symptoms. When you are not doing physical training, review fighting techniques on DVD and the Internet, speak with coaches or other fighters about successful fighting, or read motivational stories that inspire you to keep going.

Food is fuel, period. Feed your body good fuel and it will perform better. Stronger bones, quicker muscle recovery, strength, reduced inflammation, higher energy levels, and many other benefits come from eating healthier. One of the easiest ways to change your eating is to become conscious of everything that goes in your mouth. I’m not a psychologist, but somehow writing it down makes you see the difference between what you thought you were doing and what you were actually doing. Write it down!


Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]


The Kickboxing program is incredible at the Easton gym. It's much more than just a full-body workout, it teaches you how to find strength within yourself. I came into the program not realizing what I was getting into. It turns out I was jumping into a passion that I am excited to pursue every single day. Unlike other gyms with weight machines, Easton has classes throughout the day with coaches that are extremely knowledgeable and great at what they do. They push you to perform your best, and you always walk away feeling great. Every member and coach in this gym is fantastic, and it really feels like a family here. If I could I would pursue BJJ as well!
Other fighters may use the clinch to push their opponent against the cage or ropes, where they can effectively control their opponent's movement and restrict mobility while striking them with punches to the body or stomps also known as dirty boxing or "Wall and Maul". Randy Couture used his Greco Roman wrestling background to popularize this style en route to six title reigns in the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[142]
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.
While mixed martial arts is primarily a male dominated sport, it does have female athletes. Female competition in Japan includes promotions such as the all-female Valkyrie, and JEWELS (formerly known as Smackgirl).[145] However historically there has been only a select few major professional mixed martial arts organizations in the United States that invite women to compete. Among those are Strikeforce, Bellator Fighting Championships, the all female Invicta Fighting Championships, and the now defunct EliteXC.[citation needed]

Jose Octavio Rivas, Jr. – Rivas is a high school teacher in the Lennox School District of California, teaching STEM classes to a primarily minority student population with a high poverty rate. In his efforts, Rivas has secured over $150,000 in funding, and is focused on helping his students succeed by preparing to become engineers. Rivas was a runner-up for our 2016 Escalante-Gradillas Prize for Best in Education.
Some MMA promotions tend to exist more to build up prospects while others have a good mix of prospects and veterans.[60] Some exist only to be feeder leagues to the bigger promotions (e.g. LFA, CWFC),[61] others exist to try to be the best in the world (e.g. ACB, ONE Championship).[62][63] Some promotions only do four shows a year while others are doing them monthly.
“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”

Clover don’t listen to any of these guys. I actually do Jiu-Jitsu and there are girls in the class and they love it. When I first started smaller weaker guys who knew the right techniques would be able to choke me out. Now I do the same to big guys that don’t know what there doing. At your size you may not be able to throw or push alot of people but you can still trip them. This is why you should learn some Judo as well. Look up judo leg trips on youtube. And then once you get them to the ground a leg choke is the way too go. Your legs are probably still stronger than most guys arms.


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