Another obvious area of importance for MMA fighters is strength training.  Unlike body builders, most MMA fighters don’t want to lift weights in a manner that will see them bulk up too much. MMA fighters are more interested in gaining strength in multiple muscle groups while also maintaining flexibility to remain competitive in wrestling and grappling.  Many MMA fighters use very basic exercises like push ups, pull ups, squats and other calisthenics in order to work large muscle groups at the same time.

Do a strength training workout three or four days a week. Weight training using free weights or specialized machines at the gym are good choices. Alternate between your upper and lower body each time you work out. You want to push yourself by lifting the heaviest possible weights, but you don't want to hurt yourself or become sore. Lessen the amount of weights or number of repetitions if you need to.

The Systems Training Center gyms were created to offer high quality classes in boxing, kickboxing/Muay Thai, BJJ (Brazilian Jiu Jitsu), Krav Maga, CrossFit, HIIT Fit (High Intensive Interval Training), Combat conditioning, yoga for adults and kids martial arts classes, including kids BJJ and kids Krav Maga. Our vision when we opened was to create a safe, fun and empowering home away from home for people of all ages, backgrounds, and ethnicities. Systems Training Center has a well-known MMA team with fighters competing in some of the top MMA organizations, such as the UFC, Bellator, and LFA. This makes for high-quality classes, taught by some of the best coaches in the world!


Clover don’t listen to any of these guys. I actually do Jiu-Jitsu and there are girls in the class and they love it. When I first started smaller weaker guys who knew the right techniques would be able to choke me out. Now I do the same to big guys that don’t know what there doing. At your size you may not be able to throw or push alot of people but you can still trip them. This is why you should learn some Judo as well. Look up judo leg trips on youtube. And then once you get them to the ground a leg choke is the way too go. Your legs are probably still stronger than most guys arms.

The high profile of modern MMA promotions such as UFC and Pride has fostered an accelerated development of the sport. The early 1990s saw a wide variety of traditional styles competing in the sport.[72] However, early competition saw varying levels of success among disparate styles. In the early 1990s, practitioners of grappling based styles such as Brazilian jiu-jitsu dominated competition in the United States. Practitioners of striking based arts such as boxing, kickboxing, and karate, who were unfamiliar with submission grappling, proved to be unprepared to deal with its submission techniques.[73][74][75][76][77] As competitions became more and more common, those with a base in striking arts became more competitive as they cross-trained in styles based around takedowns and submission holds.[77] Likewise, those from the varying grappling styles added striking techniques to their arsenal. This increase of cross-training resulted in fighters becoming increasingly multidimensional and well-rounded in their skill-sets.
The new hybridization of fighting styles can be seen in the technique of "ground and pound" developed by wrestling-based UFC pioneers such as Dan Severn, Don Frye and Mark Coleman. These wrestlers realized the need for the incorporation of strikes on the ground as well as on the feet, and incorporated ground striking into their grappling-based styles. Mark Coleman stated at UFC 14 that his strategy was to "Ground him and pound him", which may be the first televised use of the term.
In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
The term no holds barred was used originally to describe the wrestling method prevalent in catch wrestling tournaments during the late 19th century wherein no wrestling holds were banned from the competition, regardless of how dangerous they might be. The term was applied to mixed martial arts matches, especially at the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[106]
Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.

Taking the time to set goals and make a plan is one thing. Applying it, walking it out, and making it happen is another beast. Life will always throw challenges your way. Make sure to take the time to assess “why” you are training so hard, otherwise, little distractions will knock you off course. It may be easy to stay focused if you have a fight schedule, but how consistent are you with nothing set?
If you find you are overtraining, then cut back on your workouts, starting first with the sprint portions of the cardio, and then with some of the strength training if need be, or take the day off altogether. Once you have recovered begin adding back exercises slowly to find your limit. You may find that your resting heart rate drops over the twelve weeks. This is good, and it’s a sign that your cardio is improving.
The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
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