Muay Thai is the kickboxing style most commonly used in professional Mixed Martial Arts (UFC) style competitions. It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because it allows use of punches, kicks, elbows, and knees—making it the most versatile and effective striking system on the planet. Even better, it is a great workout and not boring—this motivates people who normally hate going to the gym and gets them working out!
I've been training at abmma in D'Iberville for over a year, and although I haven't been able to go as much as I wanted to because of some neck problems, I love this gym! I can't tell you how many gyms I've started throughout the years and stopped because I never went because there was no motivation, they weren't enjoyable, I was never really "challenged." After a class with Tyler, I typically feel like I can go no more, like I gave all that I possibly had and there's nothing else left to give! He brings out the most you have in every class! He is that trainer in your ear telling you to "keep going!" I learn new techniques and combos every class. He meets you at any skill level you may have in boxing/KB, and he spends one on one time with you to fine tune or correct your technique. And if you keep up with it, you'll quickly feel stronger, more coordinated, etc., after every class. Love abmma!
In both workouts, I'm using the most underutilized form of low intensity training - low intensity circuits. Instead of picking only 1 modality, let's say running, we're able to change the stimulus and muscles worked by switching exercises every 15-20 minutes. As long as we keep our heart rate in Zone 2, aerobic adaptations will be made. If we to only choose running, the endurance of our shoulders and arms would be neglected - not ideal for an MMA fighter. 
A while ago, I wrote an article for Fight! magazine on interval training for combat sports. Far too often, “interval training” gets lumped into a single category as if all intervals are the same. If you’ve read my book, Ultimate MMA Conditioning, you know this is certainly not the case at all. In this article, I’ll give you four different interval training methods and simple guidelines to putting together an interval training program.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
As a journalist, your responsibility is to your audience, and to the society of which you are a member. It is your responsibility to make sure that this audience is totally informed on the issues. When politicians, corporations, or universities are dishonest, a good journalist presses them on it. If you see racial disparity, inequality, discrimination, abuse, or racist behavior, you have the means to expose it and change the situation.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
At UFC 232 Megan Anderson threw a high kick at Zingano and her toe made impact on the eye; it rendered Zingano was unable to defend herself, and she lost. Zingano argued to CSAC that a finger poke to the eye would have led to an NC or conceivably a DQ win, so a toe should too. However, there is no toe prohibition, as human's don't have comparable dexterity with their toes, so the petition to overturn was denied, but ED Andy Foster, said an addendum will be developed to more specifically address the issue. Zingano is adamant that there be changes: “I’d have a baby 10 times before I’d do that again. I thought I lost my eye. I thought if I opened my eye that it was going to spill out on to my face. ... It scared me, and I’m not willing to lose an eye for this sport. ... If they don’t make a rule on it, it’s open season on eye pokes. I’ve got mad dexterity with my toes, so if you’re telling me we get to just aim for people’s eyeballs with our toes now, that’s not really safe moving forward, but we’ll all find a way to win. If you put me in something on the ground, and I get to dig my toes into your eyes, too, that’s kind of gnarly, but we’re in there trying to survive. Me or you, man.” h/t MMAjunkie
The new hybridization of fighting styles can be seen in the technique of "ground and pound" developed by wrestling-based UFC pioneers such as Dan Severn, Don Frye and Mark Coleman. These wrestlers realized the need for the incorporation of strikes on the ground as well as on the feet, and incorporated ground striking into their grappling-based styles. Mark Coleman stated at UFC 14 that his strategy was to "Ground him and pound him", which may be the first televised use of the term.
I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.

Most martial arts training areas are padded, well lit, and free of objects. Natural environments couldn't be more different! On the street you've got curbs, buildings with concrete corners and protruding edges, trees, cars, etc., etc. In rooms there is furniture everywhere. Self defense training must include training in these areas, along with the use of the environment. Learning to slam your opponent into objects and avoid getting slammed and tripping over objects is extremely important.
If you prefer to work on a larger scale, a social work degree can allow you to manage and even found assistance programs for underprivileged populations that have been victimized by systemic racism. You could be a community organizer and work with the local government to help fund and promote assistance programs, and implement real change at the social level by helping people access the resources they need to get ahead and succeed in life.
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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