Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.

These are the current top 10 MMA Gyms in the world based on how many top 15 ranked UFC fighters they currently train. There are 160 fighters, who train at over 80 different gyms, in the top 15 of the UFC's 10 divisions. The rankings are based on a system where a champion earns their gym 25 points, A #1 contender is 15, a #2 contender 10 and then a decrease in ranking equaling a decrease of 1 point until the ranking reaches #10. From there, rankings 11-15 are each worth 1 point. (updated July 2015):[68]
Capoeira has been incorporated into MMA in more recent years and is often used as an addition to Brazilian jiu-jitsu; both originate from Brazil. Several fighters use this martial art when fighting, although not fully, as music and dancing are major components of the discipline. Conor McGregor incorporated some techniques and has in turn helped Capoeira gain more attention in MMA. It is known for its quick and complex manoeuvres, which use power, speed, and leverage across a wide variety of kicks, spins and techniques.
By better understanding the causes and effects of racism, you can fight it. A philosophy degree helps you learn, think, and act. Become a professor, and teach your students how to cut racism off at its roots. Become an author and write books, essays, and articles on how to combat racism, how to develop solidarity, and how to move toward a better society, one free from the cultural cancer that is racism.
Repetitive explosive power is largely a function of the nervous system’s ability to rapidly recruit muscle fibers, the percentage of these fibers that are fast-twitch, and specific elastic properties of the muscles themselves. If you think of muscles as somewhat like rubber bands in their ability to stretch and contract, this last quality refers to how fast the muscles recoil when they are stretched and this is a quality that can be enhanced through training.
It should be noted that the structure of a typical professional MMA bout has a true work-to-complete rest ratio of 5:1 (5 minute rounds, 1 minute breaks), while the work-to-active rest ratio inside each 5 minute round is determined by the tactical strategies and the skill set of the MMA athletes. Fighters described as "grinders" such as Michael Bisping or Nick Diaz will display a much higher work-rest ratio than more "explosive" athletes like Jose Aldo or Tyron Woodley.

Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
Some MMA promotions tend to exist more to build up prospects while others have a good mix of prospects and veterans.[60] Some exist only to be feeder leagues to the bigger promotions (e.g. LFA, CWFC),[61] others exist to try to be the best in the world (e.g. ACB, ONE Championship).[62][63] Some promotions only do four shows a year while others are doing them monthly.

The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.


Start networking. Get online and start building a presence for yourself as an amateur fighter. Get your name out there. Attend UFC fights and make contacts in the sport, join message boards and participate as much as you can in the community. If you want to become a professional mixed martial artist, you've got to make your life revolve around the sport.

Let’s take a sledgehammer as an example. Who remembers David Faulkner from The Ultimate Fighter U.S. versus U.K., when he missed the tire and instead hit the concrete and his leg with a sledgehammer? Does it mean that sledgehammer exercises are bad? Not at all, it just means he shouldn't have been doing it, as he had no idea how to use the sledgehammer. Sometimes the exercises that look cool are not the best choices. I am not saying they are not effective, but the problem is that if you can develop the same qualities using much safer options, so why not do that? If as a coach you do decide that smashing a tire with a sledgehammer will give your fighter an edge, make sure he/she knows how to use the tools before they attempt to do so. Your job is to make sure the sessions are effective and safe and they contribute to your athlete becoming a better fighter, which brings us to point number 2. 
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
On February 27, 2014, 29-year-old Booto Guylain was transported to Johannesburg General Hospital to be treated for swelling and bleeding on the brain after suffering a KO loss via elbow in the last round of his fight in South African promotion “Extreme Fighting Championship Africa”. He was unable to make a recovery, and after one week in the hospital he was pronounced dead.[186][187]

"I want to compete in the strawweight division, win this belt and I will do that, mark my words here and now. After that, I will move to the flyweight division. ... I beat Jessica [Andrade] so easily, only with my jab. There is nobody else who has beaten her [at strawweight]. For me, it’s 50-50 between her and Rose Namajunas. If Rose Namajunas is going to be smart and use her footwork and distance, she can win this fight. But of course, Jessica Andrade is like a bull in a fight. I cannot wait to face Rose or Andrade, but I would like to face Andrade one more time to show to people that there is only one person that can beat her, and it’s me.” h/t MMA Fighting • Listen to EuroBash (5:00 min mark)


The clinch or "plum" of a Muay Thai fighter is often used to improve the accuracy of knees and elbows by physically controlling the position of the opponent. Anderson Silva is well known for his devastating Muay Thai clinch. He defeated UFC middle weight champion Rich Franklin using the Muay Thai clinch and kneeing Franklin repeatedly to the body and face - breaking Franklin's nose. In their rematch Silva repeated this and won again.[141]


Danny Indio is certified as an Apprentice Instructor in Jeet Kune Do Concepts and Filipino Martial Arts under Sifu Dan Anderson (a student of the famous Guro Dan Inosanto) in New York City. He has trained under many instructors, such as Vitor "Shaolin" Ribeiro and Paul Vunak. He is also a Muay Thai instructor. Indio was a Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructor from 2001-2003. He has over ten years of experience teaching martial arts, and has fought—and won—numerous matches in boxing, grappling tournaments and stick fighting competitions.
Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.

I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.
Sure, the hype machine was in full effect leading up to this August rematch, but when put on the sport’s biggest stagefor a second time, both Conor McGregor and Nate Diaz stepped up once more. Filled with drama from start to finish, McGregor started fast and Diaz finished strong, but it was “The Notorious” one who emerged victorious via decision, evening the score with Stockton’s finest and setting the stage for what fans hope will be a rubber match.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
In Denmark, Mixed Martial Arts may be practiced but is not an official or legally regulated sport. On November 11, 2012 the voluntary Danish Mixed Martial Arts Federation held its first official general assembly in Odense, Denmark. There the DMMAF was officially founded and a board was elected headed up by President Claus Larsen. The Federation was publicly launched on Friday November 24, inviting Danish MMA organizations, gyms and academies to sign up as members. The DMMAF is working towards recognition under the Danish Sports Federation, Dansk Idræts Forbund. On November 25 the DMMAF's application to the International Mixed Martial Arts Federation was approved.[215][216]
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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