“In my opinion, real self-defense is more of a mental match up then a physical size match up. Mr. Arnebeck is a unique teacher. I have found him to be very open minded to new ideas and he realizes the only constant is change. I see him as student as well as a teacher and he is constantly adding to his resume and skills by continuing his education. He has been a student of Rickson Gracie (7th degree black belt BJJ) since 1996, and brings in Rodrigo Vaghi (3rd degree black belt BJJ) and Tom Crone (highest ranking Judo Master In MN) to the Warriors Cove for seminars. Its important to me that he continue to provide me with up to date information.”
Create a weekly schedule to establish a personal routine. Plan your workouts at least a week in advance, evenly spacing strength training, cardio, and rest days apart to give your exercising schedule variety. Intersperse days focused on your personal strengths with days focused on weaknesses to challenge yourself evenly throughout the week and prevent burnout.
Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
Professional fights are 3 x 5 minute rounds with 1 minute rest in between rounds and Championship bouts are 5 x 5 minute rounds with 1 minute rest in between rounds. Amateur fights are slightly shorter, generally 3 x 3 minutes or less. A 15 minute or 25 minute fight then, requires a full spectrum of endurance capabilities. A respectable aerobic energy system must be developed to last the whole duration of the fight, while the short, repeated bursts of high-intensity action require a degree of anaerobic capacity and neuromuscular-alactic power.
On April 3, 2001, the NJSACB held a meeting to discuss the regulation of mixed martial arts events. This meeting attempted to unify the myriad rules and regulations which had been utilized by the different mixed martial arts organizations. At this meeting, the proposed uniform rules were agreed upon by the NJSACB, several other regulatory bodies, numerous promoters of mixed martial arts events and other interested parties in attendance. At the conclusion of the meeting, all parties in attendance were able to agree upon a uniform set of rules to govern the sport of mixed martial arts.[53]
By better understanding the causes and effects of racism, you can fight it. A philosophy degree helps you learn, think, and act. Become a professor, and teach your students how to cut racism off at its roots. Become an author and write books, essays, and articles on how to combat racism, how to develop solidarity, and how to move toward a better society, one free from the cultural cancer that is racism.

On September 30, 2000, the New Jersey State Athletic Control Board (NJSACB) began allowing mixed martial arts promoters to conduct events in New Jersey. The first event was an IFC event titled Battleground 2000 held in Atlantic City. The intent was to allow the NJSACB to observe actual events and gather information to establish a comprehensive set of rules to regulate the sport effectively.[53]
Boxers undergo some of the most intense training to prepare for just minutes in the ring. Sure, lifting weights and running endless miles will do the trick, but lets be real, nothing feels better than sweating it out like a true badass. Treadmills and stairmasters are child’s play in comparison to banging out a few rounds of speed rope or deadly one-two combinations. 

Even with this seamless integration of styles, members can still focus on what they want by attending Standing Fighting Days for an emphasis on Kickboxing, Clinching & Takedowns, or Ground Fighting for Brazilian Jiu Jitsu & Ground Fighting techniques. Of course, real fighting includes both standing and ground fighting, so both are essential for those who want a complete system of fighting without major weaknesses.
Wedge one end of a barbell into the corner of a room (the edge of a bench can also be used). You may want to wrap the end of the bar in a towel to prevent slipping or damage to the walls. Place a light weight-plate on the other end of the bar, and grab the bar with your right hand near the edge. Get into a fighting stance, left foot forward (or right foot, if you’re a southpaw) and knees bent. Now bend both your knees and transfer your weight onto your back leg, as if you were crouching down before a jump [1]. 

“Thank you for your great school. Not only is the instruction great but the entire atmosphere is warm, professional and energizing. I am now living in Orange County (South of L.A) and I am preparing for law school entrance tests. I really miss the Warrior’s Cove! Although I had no prior instruction in martial arts, I felt that your school was first class. My belief was confirmed as I tried to find a school to train at here in California. There are many good schools in the area but I wish one of them was yours. I realize now how important it is to learn good positional control skills first, and I appreciate the fact that you hold off on submissions until a degree of skill & experience has been achieved. Those I have talked to here are unfamiliar with such restrictions, and I think It has definitely been to my advantage. We are planning on moving back to MN after a few years out here, and I hope you are still instructing. Sorry the letter is so long, but I wanted to thank you. Take care.”
How to: They’re often performed on basketball courts, but these sprints can be done anywhere. Set up six markers, each one six yards apart. Sprint from the first line to the second and touch the line with your hand. Run back and touch the first line, then immediately sprint to the third. Back to the first, then to the fourth. Continue and repeat until you can’t.

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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