Volume indicates how much total work is being put into endurance training. In sports like running, cycling and swimming, volume will be represented by the total distance travelled during training. In team sports and sports like MMA, training volume is measured by using the "time in zone" method. How much time per training day or training week are we spending in each training zone? This will give us an idea on how much rest an athlete needs, or whether we need to push them harder to achieve the level of conditioning we're seeking.

This program will help you maintain or improve the range of motion about your joints and surrounding muscles; reducing the risk of injury and promoting performance. Many times our common hamstring, back and knee pain can be caused from inflexibility and tight structures. Following an organized strteching program can usually eliminate these. Are you an athlete? Being able to move through a full range of motion can increase power output by optimizing biomechanical leverage position.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]
During moderate to high intensities, lactic acid and hydrogen ions begin to accumulate as the supply of oxygen does not match the demands of the working muscles - this is the byproduct of the anaerobic energy system. However, another byproduct of this energy system is lactate (mistakenly called lactic acid by the general population). Lactate is closely correlated with fatigue, however: correlation does not imply causation. Lactate is the 4th type of fuel that can be used to restore energy, primarily happening within the mitochondria of cells - the same location aerobic metabolism takes place.
Hi, thankyou for writing this blog and gave me a insight on the mma theory as I’ve been studying and training in mma for six months after returning 14 years away and experienced domestic violence from my former husband and couldn’t take the pain let alone allow my demons to control me no more also wished my children to have a better future as they too train with me in taekwondo, Hapkido but I also do cage and muay Thai kickboxing as well. I begun with boxing and weight training in the gym last February and rejoined the mma world where I’ve found myself again but I’m facing one obstacle and I’m too hard on myself when I train. I tend to punish myself if I don’t get a certain technique perfected and I punish myself through more training Til I get it right. My teammates are terrific when they encourage and assure me but I still punish myself as I want it to get all perfected even just once. I know this presents ego behaviour but I want to make myself, my children, my friends, family, teammates, teachers even those I idolise to be proud of me. It has given me great confidence to be stronger and disciplined as well helped with my anger issues. ,
If you find you are overtraining, then cut back on your workouts, starting first with the sprint portions of the cardio, and then with some of the strength training if need be, or take the day off altogether. Once you have recovered begin adding back exercises slowly to find your limit. You may find that your resting heart rate drops over the twelve weeks. This is good, and it’s a sign that your cardio is improving. 

Also, if it happens that you pushed too hard (which most likely will happen or has already happened to all of us at some point), make a note in the training log and adjust the intensity. The more you know your athlete, the more you can fine-tune the training. This is why I do not believe in six of eight week training camps. To know your athlete well, you need to work with them on a regular basis.
Hey I’m a 19 year old training to become an mma fighter. I dropped out of college to pursue this passion. I still have a job but only work Fri Sat Sun and have the rest of the week to train. I currently do 2 days of strength and conditioning/jiu jitsu, 2 days of jiu jitsu/muay thai and 1 day of just strength and conditioning. So I basically do 2-a-days 4 days a week, but I’m limited to 1 workout Friday because of work. Does this sound like a decent schedule? My coach said I could incorporate sprint training during the dead space between jiu jitsu and muay thai on the days I’m doing those. Would that maybe be too much on top of the stuff I’m already doing? He said because I’m young it’s hard for me to overtrain.
At 6 a.m. every training day, Mosley begins his work at the track. But instead of pushing through a trudging run, he varies his cardio workouts by doing intervals, which are a key way to train your body and increase stamina. Intervals are short bursts of running, interspersed with longer runs. For example, you might sprint for 30 seconds at a high-intensity pace, then run at a more moderate pace for 3 minutes, then perform another 30-second sprint. Click here for 3 Interval Workouts that will whip you in to shape.
Edit: After speaking to a respected S&C coach that trains elite fighters, he and I both came to the conclusion that I have overstated the importance of lower intensity aerobic development, causing some of my points to be flat out wrong. MMA is no doubt an anaerobic sport - a comprehensive review of the literature on combat sports suggest that anaerobic capacity (lower end, longer bouts of anaerobic efforts) is what distinguishes high level fighters, to lower level competitors. I still believe a solid aerobic base should be possessed and the conditioning work should compliment MMA training. If MMA training lacks anaerobic capacity work, conditioning must address this. If MMA training has sufficient anaerobic capacity work, a S&C coach should preserve these adaptations. 
The AEROBIC system (also known as the oxidative system) is the slowest acting energy system in our body, yet it is capable of creating the most energy. At rest, around 65-70% of your energy comes from the utilization of fat, 25-30% comes from carbohydrates, while less than 5-10% comes from amino acids (protein). As intensity increases, these percentages shift - carbohydrates become more important because of its quicker availability in the body. That's why you need adequate blood sugar (carb) levels when exercising or doing intensive activity. The aerobic energy system is the predominant system involved in exercise lasting 2-3 minutes, to hours and even days. The aerobic system (aero meaning air) requires oxygen to utilize fat stores (body fat) and carbohydrate stores (in your muscles and liver). 
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

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