“I am a huge fan of BJJ and MMA so this chance for me to learn what I have seen is very very cool. It is an honor to be taught by you after learning so much about your martial arts history and your practice under Rickson. The Warrior’s Cove is, in my opinion, the only place to go for martial arts training. Everything is very practical due to it being based on real life scenarios. I have learned so much in just the 4 weeks I have been there. I have a very demanding job (Senior Loan Officer) and I am almost always able to work around my schedule because of the class availability. I think whether you are a beginner looking for self defense skills or you want to expand on past martial art experiences, the Warrior’s Cove has what you are looking for. Thank you Dave for everything! I look forward to my future with the Cove and getting a Black Belt from you or Rickson himself!”
Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
Almost everyone is familiar with plyometrics and the entire paradigm of plyometric training was designed largely developed to serve this exact purpose. Reactive power intervals are an effective blend of plyometrics and intervals and while most interval methods fall short in improving explosiveness because they are often performed in a constant state of fatigue, reactive power intervals take a unique approach and produce far better results.
Include flexibility training to your regimen, but don’t try to be at contortionist. Include stretching into your training regimen, however don’t get hung up on being able to do the splits, put your foot behind your head, or bending yourself like a pretzel. Stretching is good to help prevent injuries, and keep your body more flexible. However don’t tear your muscles and tendons trying to become more flexible. Stretch lightly after your workouts when your body is warm. Don’t stretch before a workout, that is the way to pull or even rip a muscle. Doing most exercises to their full range of motion is a great way to stretch while you are working out. A lot of times you won’t need extra stretching after a workout, but if you feel tight after a workout, that is the best time to lightly stretch.
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.
Whether you want to be an mixed martial artist or you're an amateur athlete hoping to improve your game, training like an MMA fighter is a great high-intensity workout. MMA training routines can help you hone your discipline, endurance, and agility while strengthening your core. Practice these training exercises on your own or enlist the help of a coach, personal trainer, or MMA class. With persistence and the right technique, you can train just like the pros.
It should be noted that the structure of a typical professional MMA bout has a true work-to-complete rest ratio of 5:1 (5 minute rounds, 1 minute breaks), while the work-to-active rest ratio inside each 5 minute round is determined by the tactical strategies and the skill set of the MMA athletes. Fighters described as "grinders" such as Michael Bisping or Nick Diaz will display a much higher work-rest ratio than more "explosive" athletes like Jose Aldo or Tyron Woodley.
Blocking - your various defensive tools designed to intercept your assailant's oncoming blow during the street fight. Avoid reflexive blinking when a punch or kick is thrown at you during a real street fight. A split-second blink could leave you vulnerable to the opponent's blow. Blinking is a natural reflex. As a matter of fact, the eye blinks every two to ten seconds. However, reflexive eye blinking during a physical attack can be eliminated with proper self-defense training. For example, during sparring and full-contact simulated street fighting sessions, you must make a conscious effort to keep your head forward and your eyes open amid flying blows. This skill, of course, will take time and above all - courage.
“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”  

Blocking - your various defensive tools designed to intercept your assailant's oncoming blow during the street fight. Avoid reflexive blinking when a punch or kick is thrown at you during a real street fight. A split-second blink could leave you vulnerable to the opponent's blow. Blinking is a natural reflex. As a matter of fact, the eye blinks every two to ten seconds. However, reflexive eye blinking during a physical attack can be eliminated with proper self-defense training. For example, during sparring and full-contact simulated street fighting sessions, you must make a conscious effort to keep your head forward and your eyes open amid flying blows. This skill, of course, will take time and above all - courage.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
“This is 70% of the entire plan. I can work out religiously, but if I’m not eating clean, I’m wasting my time. I eat five small meals a day that consist of protein, good carbs, and veggies. No cheat meals except once on Sunday. Here is a sample day of meals (accompanied by one gallon of water per day) that will get me into lean and mean fighting shape.”
Even though Systems Training Center has some very talented instructors, our focus is on our member experience and customer service. Whether people train in fitness, self-defense or fighting, we pride ourselves on offering martial arts and fitness classes that continue to inspire, motivate and empower our students. This mindset shows as we have many members who have been with us since we first opened. Often, they don’t just train themselves, but their kids, parents, and siblings train at the gym too!
Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
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