Dr. Cruz is a board certified pediatrician who joins Philadelphia FIGHT as the Medical Director for our Pediatrics and Adolescent Health Center. He completed his undergraduate training in Biology and Psychology from Union College, his medical school training at Albany Medical College, his residency training at St. Christopher’s Hospital for Children, and his Chief Residency at the Albert Einstein Medical Center.

Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
We asked him for his favorite workout, the one he’ll turn to as the fight day draws near, and he said, “Every day I go to the gym, the first thing I do is shadowbox. I probably shadowbox, I don’t know, 10 minutes.” He paused. Thought about what makes him a champion. Then he withdrew: “If I give my own gameplan, I’m giving the world my remedy on how I train. I can’t give the world my remedy.”
Sambo, a martial art and combat sport developed in Russia in the early 1920s, merged various forms of combat styles such as wrestling, judo and striking into one unique martial art.[21][22] The popularity of professional wrestling, which was contested under various catch wrestling rules at the time, waned after World War I, when the sport split into two genres: "shoot", in which the fighters actually competed, and "show", which evolved into modern professional wrestling.[23] In 1936, heavyweight boxing contender Kingfish Levinsky and veteran Catch wrestler Ray Steele competed in a mixed match, which Steele won in 35 seconds.[23]
hi, im 38yo, training MMA 2x wk and can make it thru the PT 20min cardio (jumping jacks, squats, sprawls, jogging,army crawls, shrimps, squat thrusts, pushups,v ups, situps etc) but gas out 1-2min into the 3 min rolling rounds (and sometimes sooner) to the point where if i dont tap someone out before times up, im tapping cause im gassed and claustrophobic when someone gets on top of me.
How to: Begin in a standing position with feet shoulder-width apart. Lower down into a squat and place your palms on the ground so that the elbows are positioned just inside the knees. Kick your feet back into a plank, then lower the hips and arch your back, so your body resembles a more active cobra pose. Reverse the exercise, jump the feet forward, and explode back up to the starting position.
Happy New Years from the In Fighting Shape podcast! Have questions on what your New Year's resolution could be? Comedian and actor, Wil Slyvince rejoins the podcast to talk just that and other topics such as began vegan, hanging out with fellow comedians, and his opinions on what's going on. Be a better you, after listening to podcast episode 71 of In Fighting Shape. 
Submission-Seeking is a reference to the strategy of taking an opponent to the ground using a takedown or throw and then applying a submission hold, forcing the opponent to submit. While grapplers will often work to attain dominant position, some may be more comfortable fighting from other positions. If a grappler finds themselves unable to force a takedown, they may resort to pulling guard, whereby they physically pull their opponent into a dominant position on the ground.[137]
“This is 70% of the entire plan. I can work out religiously, but if I’m not eating clean, I’m wasting my time. I eat five small meals a day that consist of protein, good carbs, and veggies. No cheat meals except once on Sunday. Here is a sample day of meals (accompanied by one gallon of water per day) that will get me into lean and mean fighting shape.”

If you are truly interested in learning effective, practical self-defense and Mixed Martial Arts skills, you've come to the right place. There are many schools with instructors who have never fought in an MMA event or even trained an MMA fighter at a high level, but at Ohana Academy, we're the real deal. We offer the highest level instruction in both the grappling and striking, and as a result, our students are able to compete in Mixed Martial Arts, Thai Boxing, Boxing, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and high-level Grappling events. 

The announcement, made by HBO Sports executive vice president Peter Nelson, 37, who met with his staff on Thursday morning, does not come as a total shock. The network's commitment to the sport has clearly waned in recent years and its quality of fights has dropped at a time when there has been more competition from longtime rival Showtime as well as outlets such as ESPN, because of its year-old alliance with promoter Top Rank, and newly created streaming outlet DAZN to acquire the best fights.
Boxing is a combat form that is widely used in MMA and is one of the primary striking bases for many fighters.[97] Boxing punches account for the vast majority of strikes during the stand up portion of a bout and also account for the largest number of significant strikes, knock downs and KOs in MMA matches.[98] Several aspects of boxing are extremely valuable such as footwork, combinations, and defensive techniques like slips, head movement and stance (including chin protection and keeping hands up) commonly known as the Guard position.[99] Boxing-based fighters have also been shown to throw and land a higher volume of strikes when compared with other striking bases, at a rate of 3.88 per minute with 9.64 per minute thrown (compared with Muay Thai at 3.46 and 7.50, respectively).[97] Fighters known for using boxing include Cain Velasquez, Nick Diaz, Junior dos Santos, B.J. Penn, Dan Hardy, Shane Carwin and Andrei Arlovski.

Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
Ethnic Studies programs, essentially, involve the study of the position, representation, experiences and history of non-white groups, many of whom are ethnic minorities in America. This is not to lump each type into a single category, but to only focus on one for the sake of this entry would be overlooking the fact that racism impacts many different groups.
Since the UFC came to prominence in mainstream media in 2006, and with their 2007 merger with Pride FC and purchases of WEC and Strikeforce, no companies have presented significant competition,[58] and the UFC is regarded as having most of the top ranked talent.[59] Fighters usually get contracts in the UFC after competing successfully in other MMA promotions from around the world.
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.
As you can see, it differs from the traditional programming. I have decreased the load but increased the time and also allowed for a short break between each repetition. Again, the numbers above are based on experience and they may differ for other athletes. I found this range of time, rest and reps very effective when introducing TUT for the first time. I wouldn't use it more than 2x a year for big exercises like squat and bench press. I haven’t used it for deadlifts and would not recommend doing so, as I personally think it puts too much stress on the back.
Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.

The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 


Freeze – never end up here… when you are so shocked that you don’t know how to react…. imagine some 6’9″ 300 lbs muscled up bad dude yelling at your face in threatening manner or like standing few inches away from grizzly bear (assuming the bear is behind the zoo cage) but still… your brain will be filled with rush, fear, anxiety, freeze, etc… understand yourself… understand what you are fearful of, why and ways to conquer that.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Whether you want to be an mixed martial artist or you're an amateur athlete hoping to improve your game, training like an MMA fighter is a great high-intensity workout. MMA training routines can help you hone your discipline, endurance, and agility while strengthening your core. Practice these training exercises on your own or enlist the help of a coach, personal trainer, or MMA class. With persistence and the right technique, you can train just like the pros.

Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional. 

Michelle: I don't actually feel that the "resistance" needed representation on TV. My impression of scripted television is that it's either apolitical or vaguely liberal. We're not writing The Good Fight because there was a hole to fill. Instead, we're mainly following the characters. Diane was established as an ardent liberal when we began The Good Wife in 2009. We knew that she — as well as her colleagues at a Chicago African-American law firm — would have a strong opinion about the current administration.  It felt like a lie not to dramatize that.
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