Mayweather doesn’t use free weights often; he prefers to build upper body strength in different ways. Other than hitting the mitts, which is Mayweather’s favorite way to work his arms, his go-to equipment is a medicine ball. Holding the medicine ball in both hands, he’ll throw the ball up, catch it, push it up, then bring it down again and repeat. And when he’s not using a medicine ball, he’s supplementing his workout with bodyweight exercises. For a workout that doesn’t require weights, check out The No-Gym, No Excuses Workout.
Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
To begin, lie on your side and draw your top knee up to 90 degrees using a foam roller or medicine ball. Bring your hands together out in front of you and begin the movement by turning your top hand over and sliding it along the ground, up and over your head. The goal is to keep the back of the hand as close to the ground as possible throughout the entire movement. Once you reach your butt, reverse the movement and slide your hand back around the head to the starting position. Perform eight to 10 circles per side.

Train with the best in the business. Our work ethic and attention to detail is what separates us from other performance training facilities when it comes to NFL Combine prep work. Having combined decades of experience coaching at the collegiate level at both West Virginia University and the University of Michigan, the NFL Combine has always been a top focus of ours and priority for our athletes. We tackle combine training from all angles, increasing your physical strength and speed as well as your mental toughness with a hands-on approach and an emphasis on walking our athletes through the proper biomechanical positions ensuring their performance on testing day as well continued performance throughout their careers.


2) Way Down Way Back-Feet spread more than shoulder width apart, torso erect, arms at shoulder height to the sides, elbows bent at right angle with fists pointed up. Bring fists to stomach striking stomach and then immediately bend forward at the waist and lightly striking fists to floor, as you arise, again strike fists to stomach and then return to starting position. This is a ballistic exercise done quickly with intensity and is designed to warm up the shoulders, torso, and stretch the lower body.
MMA training programs are often split into the individual components of striking, wrestling, and submission grappling. In addition, you must work on your strength and conditioning. Because of the numerous demands on your time, the best MMA training programs must be efficient. Generally, you will want to focus on the basics, the simple, most high percentage techniques such as the jab and cross, the double leg takedown, and positional work on the ground. You need to ensure that you are training smart and resting as well, otherwise you will be unable to perform to your best.
Life Time Fitness is fairly new to the game, having launched its mixed combat arts program one year ago. The 12-week classes are offered at two Minnesota locations — Chanhassen and Lakeville. In contrast to larger, grittier combat centers like the Academy, Life Time’s MMA studio in Chanhassen has a polished design. It converted racquetball courts into an MMA training space outfitted with thick floor mats, padded walls, speed bags and a cage-like fence. The setting helps newbies feel less intimidated about trying the sport, Morlan said.
An expert in leadership and human performance, Dr. Paul "Paulie Gloves" Gavoni is a highly successful professional striking coach in mixed martial arts. As an athletic leader and former golden gloves heavyweight champion of Florida, Coach Paulie successfully applies the science of human behavior to coach multiple fighters to championship titles at varying levels worldwide. With many successful fighters on his resume, Coach Paulie tailors his approach to fit the needs of specific fighters based on a fighters behavioral, physiological, and psychological characteristics. Coach Paulie is a writer for Last Word on Sports and is a featured coach in the book, Beast: Blood, Struggle, and Dreams at the Heart of Mixed Martial Arts.
What is the makeup of a great MMA fighter? I will not be going into the technical mastery of various martial arts, but looking at it more from the strength and conditioning coach point of view. An MMA fighter has to be strong enough to dominate the opponent, throw powerful punches and kicks, absorb impact, and be able to resist a constant application of force. He or she has to be powerful and fast, and have enough endurance to be able to perform at high level for five 5-minute rounds. The training program has to address all of the above qualities without compromising one another. This is the beauty of strength and conditioning training for combat sports - as an S&C coach you are a part of a team that creates such a well-rounded athlete.
In the year 2000, MMA play-by-play commentator Stephen Quadros coined the popular phrase lay and pray. This refers to a situation where a wrestler or grappler keeps another fighter pinned or controlled on the mat to avoid a stand up, yet exhibits little urgency to finish the grounded opponent with a knockout or a submission for the majority or entirety of the fight.[130] The implication of "lay and pray" is that after the wrestler/grappler takes the striker down and 'lays' on him to neutralize the opponent's striking weapons, he 'pray's that the referee does not return them to the standing position. This style is considered by many fans as the most boring style of fighting and is highly criticized for intentionally creating non-action, yet it is effective. Some argue that 'lay-and-pray' is justified and that it is the responsibility of the downed fighter to be able to protect himself from this legitimate fighting technique.[130][131][132][133] Many consider Jon Fitch's style to epitomize 'lay and pray'.[134] Former UFC Welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre has been criticized by fans for playing it safe and applying the lay and pray tactic in his fights,[135] as has Bellator MMA Welterweight champion Ben Askren, who justified the tactic, explaining that championship fights are much harder as are five rounds long, compared with the usual three.[136]

Determine the striking style you want to learn. If you want to be a well-rounded fighter, you'll want to develop solid punching and kicking skills. The most common stand up disciplines in MMA are Muay Thai kickboxing, boxing, Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. Watch fighters that practice the fighting disciplines that you're interested in to help you decide on what styles you want to pursue.[1]


As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]
Another early example of mixed martial arts was Bartitsu, which Edward William Barton-Wright founded in London in 1899. Combining catch wrestling, judo, boxing, savate, jujutsu and canne de combat (French stick fighting), Bartitsu was the first martial art known to have combined Asian and European fighting styles,[18] and which saw MMA-style contests throughout England, pitting European Catch wrestlers and Japanese Judoka champions against representatives of various European wrestling styles.[18]
Another common myth is that lactate doesn't form until you perform high-intensity exercises. Lactate actually forms even during lower intensity exercise (because the anaerobic system is still active to a degree). The amount of lactate produced is very minimal; we are able to shuttle this lactate into our mitochondria via the Cori-Cycle and effectively reuse it as energy. During the later round of a intense brawl however, the rate of lactate clearance simply cannot match the rate of which it is produced, this is called the lactate threshold. The figure below shows how lactate is recycled as energy after being produced as a by-product of fast glycoglysis (anaerobic metabolism).
But just because it's a straightforward workout, that doesn't mean you should take it lightly. Camozzi stresses that you should push yourself, working at a quick pace with fast punches and lots of footwork. "You will feel it in your legs after the shadowboxing, and that's what we want," he says. "Picture yourself in the ring fighting. No dropping your hands or walking around and throwing a combo here and there."
The best MMA training programs cover a range of skills. Gone are the days where one-dimensional grapplers submitted strikers with no knowledge of the ground game. While fighters will normally favor one area of fighting, a well-rounded fighter needs to be able to survive in every area of the game or face being overwhelmed outside his comfort zone. Furthermore, he will need to be able to put the separate aspects of the game together in actual MMA sessions.

You have fourteen body weapons or street fighting techniques that you have at your disposal at all times. When properly executed these techniques have the capacity to disable, cripple and even kill your criminal adversary. Keep in mind that whenever you use physical force against another person in a street fight you must be absolutely certain that your actions are legally warranted and justified in the eyes of the law. Therefore, you should have a fundamental understanding of the law so you will know when it's appropriate to use force against another person in a fight. Moreover, you will also need to know how much physical force can be applied in a fight without facing excessive force charges. To learn more about these street fighting techniques see armed to the teeth volume 1 and volume 2.


If you don't have access to a heavy bag, or you need a workout you can do from a hotel room or small space, don't worry, there's a solution. In fact, according to Matt Marsden, a fitness instructor at Beacon College in Leesburg, Florida, who has a training and coaching background in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, boxing, Muay Thai, and Tae Kwon Do, this type of workout is pretty common for MMA fighters because they travel so frequently and sometimes have to train outside of the typical gym setting.
Learning how to street fight with the skill and confidence of a sesoned fighter is something that can certainly be achieved. As a matter of fact, I have dedicated my entire live to teaching law abiding people how to defend and protect themselves in the streets. However, I have to tell you from the start that it's not such and easy task; it will require a bit of dedication on your part. But, if you are willing to do some serious studying as well as some practical self-defense training you could learn the skills necessary to win a street fight. 
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