What seems to be more important is the sparing use of these high intensity intervals outside of MMA training. By the way of training periodization, and the principle of specificity, the majority of the high intensity intervals should be performed few weeks out before the fight. Performing a high volume of high intensity training year round hinders a fighter's ability to improve their skills and stay injury-free.
Determine the striking style you want to learn. If you want to be a well-rounded fighter, you'll want to develop solid punching and kicking skills. The most common stand up disciplines in MMA are Muay Thai kickboxing, boxing, Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. Watch fighters that practice the fighting disciplines that you're interested in to help you decide on what styles you want to pursue.[1]
That’s why Silva swears by neck ups. To perform the move, grab a weight bench and lay on your back so your head is hanging off of it. Then, use your neck to raise your head up until your chin touches his chest, pausing to squeeze the muscles. Then, lay face down and repeat for another 25 reps, this time lifting your neck up as high as possible. Lay on your left shoulder and repeat, then for your right shoulder.
Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional.
Jordan Beckwith, 27, was 13 when she shattered her ankle in a horse riding accent. After an endless series of surgeries, she was finally faced with a risky ankle replacement or amputation. "I couldn’t walk, I couldn’t do my job, I couldn’t even take my dogs for a two-minute walk. I couldn’t do jiu-jitsu. I was icing my ankle every night. I didn’t want to live like that anymore. ... It would help me walk and maybe run, I could participate in sports again." On 10/11/18 she wrote her foot a breakup letter, on her foot - "It’s not me, it’s you. I’m sure we’ve had some good times together, but it’s time we parted ways. I wish you all the best. Your blood supplier." And that was the end of that. h/t Metro • Subscribe to the Footless Youtube channel

Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.
I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
I am currently a college student and am working on a project where I have to plan an entire year of training for an MMA fighter. It needs to include when the fighter should peak, what types of workouts and why, should they do aerobic or anaerobic workouts, overload, progression, etc. If you could point me in the right direction to research this project I would really appreciate it. Thank you so much!
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.
As boxing continues to evolve in mixed martial arts (MMA), so do the training methods employed. Absent from many MMA gyms is one of the most fundamental techniques used in boxing for more than a century–shadow boxing. If you are a fighter and you want to bring your boxing to the next level quickly, you must consistently incorporate shadow boxing into your training regimen. Below we will provide the rationale along with some basic strategies for getting the most out of your shadow boxing. If you shadow box regularly under the watchful eye of an expert boxing coach, you may want to stop reading here. If not, keep reading!
Striking techniques alone won't be enough. You must learn a variety of ground fighting skills and techniques if you want to cover all your bases. This often creates a problem as many people who want to learn how to street fight because the submission fighting techniques taught Brazilian jujitsu (BJJ) and mixed martial arts (mma) schools are not created or designed for real street combat. You will have to find functional and pragmatic ground fighting techniques that can readily be applied in a real world self defense situation. Please see my submission fighting for the streets DVD series to learn more.
Fuel your body right. MMA fighter Jon Manley recommends eating five clean meals per day, consisting of lean proteins, a variety of fruits and vegetables and unprocessed carbohydrates. Shop the outer rim of the grocery store to avoid the urge to purchase processed junk food that lurks on the inner-aisle shelves. Drink at least a gallon of water a day and drop your calories gradually if you need to lose weight.
While most fighters use ground-and-pound statically, by way of holding their opponents down and mauling them with short strikes from the top position, a few fighters manage to utilize it dynamically by striking their opponents while changing positions, thus not allowing their opponents to settle once they take them down. Cain Velasquez is one of the most devastating ground strikers in MMA and is known for continuing to strike his opponents on the ground while transitioning between positions.[127] Fedor Emelianenko, considered among the greatest masters of ground-and-pound in MMA history, was the first to demonstrate this dynamic style of striking in transition. He was striking his opponents on the ground while passing guard, or while his opponents were attempting to recover guard.[128][129]

The first state regulated MMA event was held in Biloxi, Mississippi on August 23, 1996 with the sanctioning of IFC's Mayhem in Mississippi[49] show by the Mississippi Athletic Commission under William Lyons. The rules used were an adaptation of the kickboxing rules already accepted by most state athletic commissions. These modified kickboxing rules allowed for take downs and ground fighting and did away with rounds, although they did allow for fighters to be stood up by the referee and restarted if there was no action on the ground. These rules were the first in modern MMA to define fouls, fighting surfaces and the use of the cage.


What is it? The term kickboxing has become kind of a blanket term to cover anything that involves punching and kicking, but Muay Thai has a few distinct features. It’s a centuries-old practice that comes, predictably, from Thailand. In addition to fists and feet, it also involves knee and elbow strikes as well as a form of stand-up grappling called clinch.
Grappling-based sports like judo and wrestling appear to have a work-rest-ratio of approximately 3:1 with work phases lasting an average of 35 seconds, while striking-based sports like kickboxing and Muay Thai have a work-to-rest ratio ranging from 2:3 and 1:2, with work phases lasting around 7 seconds on average. MMA sits in-between these values, with a work-to-rest ratio between 1:2 and 1:4 with work phases lasting 6-14 seconds, which are then separated by low-intensity efforts of 15-36 seconds.
If you are a fan of MMA since its inception, you have had a front row seat to the birth and evolution of what we consider the greatest sport in the world; one that has lineage to ancient Greek Olympics, almost 3,000 years ago, rooted in wrestling and boxing. Much like the natural selection process underlying evolution, these fans have witnessed different forms of the martial arts reign during certain eras. Fighters like Royce Gracie, Randy Couture, Chuck Liddell, Wanderlei Silva, and Anderson Silva all dominated with strategies heavily focused in BJJ, Wrestling, Kickboxing, and Muay Thai.
“If you are a small man or are a woman and want the skills to fight off an attacker, my testimonial is a must read. I’m 5’7″ and weigh 140 pounds. I’m a small guy. In fact, my frame is very similar in size or smaller than many women. The beauty of MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is that size doesn’t matter. I can defend myself in stand up punching and kicking situations, and take the fight to my opponent if needed. I now know that Judo throws and takedowns are easier for a shorter person because your center of gravity is lower and you can get under your opponent easier. If things go to the ground, I can submit or choke out an opponent who has 100+ pound weight advantage. Once on the ground everything equals out, and with training, you have a huge advantage. Your opponent will be a fish out of water. How can this be? MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) aren’t dependent on athleticism, strength or fitness. You use your brain, not brawn, and the laws of physics (leverage) to defeat your opponent.”
One of the worst elements of a real assault is the mental shock of being physically attacked. Even a moderate blow, shove, or grab can cause a person who has not experienced such contact to mentally freeze. Therefore, training must include sport style sparring in all areas, stand-up, clinch, and ground. It is absolutely essential that every self defense practitioner has experience hitting another person and getting hit, shoving another person and getting shoved, throwing, being thrown, and wrestling. This can and should be done safely, beginning with low intensity and only increasing speed and power as appropriate.
In Japan, female competition has been documented since the mid-1990s. Influenced by female professional wrestling and kickboxing, the Smackgirl competition was formed in 2001 and became the only major all-female promotion in mixed martial arts. Other early successful Japanese female organizations included Ladies Legend Pro-Wrestling, ReMix (a predecessor to Smackgirl), U-Top Tournament, K-Grace, and AX.[citation needed]
The term no holds barred was used originally to describe the wrestling method prevalent in catch wrestling tournaments during the late 19th century wherein no wrestling holds were banned from the competition, regardless of how dangerous they might be. The term was applied to mixed martial arts matches, especially at the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[106]
In the year 2000, MMA play-by-play commentator Stephen Quadros coined the popular phrase lay and pray. This refers to a situation where a wrestler or grappler keeps another fighter pinned or controlled on the mat to avoid a stand up, yet exhibits little urgency to finish the grounded opponent with a knockout or a submission for the majority or entirety of the fight.[130] The implication of "lay and pray" is that after the wrestler/grappler takes the striker down and 'lays' on him to neutralize the opponent's striking weapons, he 'pray's that the referee does not return them to the standing position. This style is considered by many fans as the most boring style of fighting and is highly criticized for intentionally creating non-action, yet it is effective. Some argue that 'lay-and-pray' is justified and that it is the responsibility of the downed fighter to be able to protect himself from this legitimate fighting technique.[130][131][132][133] Many consider Jon Fitch's style to epitomize 'lay and pray'.[134] Former UFC Welterweight champion Georges St-Pierre has been criticized by fans for playing it safe and applying the lay and pray tactic in his fights,[135] as has Bellator MMA Welterweight champion Ben Askren, who justified the tactic, explaining that championship fights are much harder as are five rounds long, compared with the usual three.[136]

This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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