“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast

When MMA spectators and fans see the effectiveness of mixed martial arts in the ring they instantly assume it's the ideal form of self defense for the street. To the uninitiated, this may seem like an obvious and logical supposition, but in reality it's wrong and can get you into a lot of trouble when faced with a street fight or any other reality based self defense situation. The truth is mixed martial arts are created and designed exclusively for sport competition and not self defense scenarios. I actually wrote a tongue-in-cheek article illustrating the drastic differences between mixed martial arts competition and reality based self defense. (see, sammy franco's open challenge.)
Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.
Do 30 to 60 minutes of a moderate-intensity aerobic activity three or four days per week. Moderate-intensity activities include cycling, jogging, swimming and hitting a punching bag. This will help improve your cardiovascular system, which means more oxygen will be used throughout your body during your big fight. Your heart and lungs will work more efficiently and you will be less tired while you are fighting.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
There are multiple contrasting studies on whether the addition of more frequent high intensity endurance training yielded any performance improvements. Some researchers found athletes that don't respond well to high volume low-intensity training showed greater improvements when they increased their frequency and volume of high intensity training. However on the contrary, the benefits of performing more high intensity training in already well-trained athletes, are limited.
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.
You never know what a fighter is truly made of until they hit some adversity. At UFC 205 in November, both welterweight champion Tyron Woodley and Stephen Thompson had to show their true mettle, and each passed their test. In the process, those of us watching from outside the cage got a five round battle worthy of having the name “world championship” attached to it. Sure, the old sports adage is that a draw is like kissing your sister, but neither Woodley or Thompson deserved to lose this one.
Rushfit by Georges St. Pierre is an 8-week program which includes a workout guide, a nutrition guide and training plans. All you need equipment are some dumbbells, around 25lbs should do the trick. The focus is on endurance rather than weight. The program comes with 6 dvds and it’s around $100, so the same as you would pay for P90X or Insanity except neither of those is hosted by Captain Canada.
This program is put together and hosted by none other than mma nutrition guru and Roy Nelson’s worst nightmare Mike Dolce. If you can’t afford to have Dolce in your home making your smoothies every morning, this is the next best thing. A big part of any workout series is whether or not you like the host of it. If Dolce isn’t your cup of tea, there are a lot of similar workouts to chose from.
I have been practising jiu-jitsu from the age of 9-16, but decided to crosstrain with kyokushinkai karate when i was 13, as jiu-jitsu doesn’t teach you how do punch or kick realistic. I plan on training taekwondo for the kicking distance, wing chun for the punching distance and bujinkan for ground, weapon and grappling distance. Bruce Lee himself trained the arts separately and extracted what was useful from them. I plan on doing sparring sessions with MMA-guys once a week, as none of the abovementioned arts spare on all levels in fighting.
Fighters act with confidence all the time. Whether they show it when it counts is another thing. Lightweight contender Tony Ferguson always shows it, and it was never more apparent than in the biggest fight of his career against Rafael Dos Anjos. Facing a hungry former champion, Ferguson took risks and battled RDA everywhere the fight went. Why? Because he was confident that whatever he did, it was going to work. That wasn’t always the case, but in the end, he got the victory and yet another Fight of the Night bonus.
Note that this workout is very simple. For example, you might ask, “Only three sets of pressing for the first workout?” Yes. Do not do more than mentioned. Sometimes volume is low to allow you to adjust to the new program or to allow for strategic deconditioning. Also, combat athletes are among the most prone to overtraining, especially if they are training in their skilled disciplines three or more times per week. Given that scenario, this workout will be perfectly adequate for results.
Train your power endurance by performing explosive exercises of a moderate load for about 30-45 seconds (or 15-20 reps), resting for 30 seconds, and repeating for 5 rounds. Circuit training is another great option. But, it's critical to remember that your intervals should be at least 30 seconds long. After all, you'll goal should be to make it through at least a least one three-minute round!
The workout lasts approximately as long as a real championship MMA fight: five rounds. In those rounds, you’ll perform a little of nearly every kind of exercise that fighters use to prepare for battle, from jumping rope to body-weight circuits to combinations on the heavy bag. Use it to get in fighting shape, and then watch the real fights from the safest of your couch. But if you want to work out like a real warrior, try stealing the routine that Genghis Khan had his armies do.
Tiffany is an American Muay Thai kickboxer who competes in the bantamweight division. Originally a Shōrin-ryū karate practitioner, van Soest began Muay Thai at the age of eighteen and was both a state and national titlist as an amateur before turning professional in 2011 and winning the WBC Muaythai International Super Bantamweight Championship the following year.

The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

Spirit Airlines' Free Spirit frequent flyer program caters to people who travel domestically all over the United States, including cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, Baltimore, Dallas-Fort Worth and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Free Spirit is also advantageous for travelers who visit Latin American and Caribbean destinations like Aruba, Jamaica, Lima, Peru, and Costa Rica. As a Free Spirit member, you'll earn miles every time you fly with Spirit Airlines. You can also collect miles for everyday purchases if you hold a Spirit Airlines World Mastercard. Plus, Spirit Airlines has partnerships with select restaurants, Choice Hotels, car rental agencies and more, which allow you to earn miles for dining, hotel stays, cruise vacations and car rentals.

"I want to compete in the strawweight division, win this belt and I will do that, mark my words here and now. After that, I will move to the flyweight division. ... I beat Jessica [Andrade] so easily, only with my jab. There is nobody else who has beaten her [at strawweight]. For me, it’s 50-50 between her and Rose Namajunas. If Rose Namajunas is going to be smart and use her footwork and distance, she can win this fight. But of course, Jessica Andrade is like a bull in a fight. I cannot wait to face Rose or Andrade, but I would like to face Andrade one more time to show to people that there is only one person that can beat her, and it’s me.” h/t MMA Fighting • Listen to EuroBash (5:00 min mark)
Corey Beasley has been a strength and conditioning coach for over 14 years. He owns Innovative Results, in Costa Mesa CA, which utilizes ‘out fo the box’ training methods to assist their clients look better, feel better and perform better. Corey works with elite level wreslters, jiu jitsu, and MMA athletes. He is also RTS1, NASM Master Instructor, OKC and IKSFA Kettlebell certified, and a Level 2 Battling Ropes Instructor.
The Delta SkyMiles program is convenient for frequent flyers based in United States cities like Atlanta, Detroit, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and Seattle, and for passengers who often travel to and from New York City. Delta Air Lines operates more than 15,000 flights each day to 1,000-plus destinations across more than 50 countries. By becoming a SkyMiles member, you'll earn miles based on the amount you pay for your flight with Delta, Delta Connection or Delta Shuttle; you can also earn miles for flying with any of Delta's multiple partner airlines, including KLM, Air France and Virgin Atlantic, among others. Those miles can be redeemed for free air travel on any participating airline or cashed in for cabin upgrades, unique experiences (such as concert tickets) or items for sale at the SkyMiles Marketplace. When you fly with Delta, you will also earn Medallion Qualification Miles, Medallion Qualification Segments and Medallion Qualification Dollars, which will help you gain access to a variety of perks through the Delta SkyMiles Medallion elite membership program. You can also earn miles on everyday purchases if you've signed up for a Delta SkyMiles credit card by American Express.
The first thing you should always do is start your MMA workout with some shadow boxing. This is done best in front of a mirror so that you can see your style of striking and the improvements you need to make while striking. If you’re new to shadow boxing, a good rule of thumb is to always finish your punching combinations with knees or kicks. If you’re a boxer then don’t worry about knees or kicks, just work on your punching combinations and your flow. Visualize the opponent in front of you and moved to create angles that could be used in a real life situation. Don’t be stagnant with your movement, allow yourself to be comfortable so that you can become more confident with your flow.
One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.
For the best results, try 2-3 plyo sessions per week along with your resistance-training regimen. Just make sure to give yourself about 48 hours of rest in between plyo sessions to allow for full recovery. Some great plyometric exercises for MMA fighters include plyo push-ups, single-arm throws, side throws, jump squats, bounding, and lateral high hops.
The Pediatric and Adolescent Health Center at Philadelphia FIGHT is dedicated to providing high quality, comprehensive, primary care to address the physical and emotional health needs of Philadelphia’s children from birth through age 18, regardless of ability to pay. Located in Center City Philadelphia, we are specially tailored to care for children and adolescents who have experienced social adversity. Philadelphia FIGHT Pediatrics is home to some of the best pediatricians in Philadelphia. We have a pediatrician on our team who is also a certified lactation counselor, and we are also able to offer breastfeeding support onsite.
HBO has one more boxing card on its schedule -- a "World Championship Boxing" doubleheader on Oct. 27 from the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. It is headlined by the vacant middleweight world title fight between Daniel Jacobs and Sergey Derevyanchenko, with junior lightweight world titlist Alberto Machado defending his belt against Yuandale Evans in the co-feature.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
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