What is the makeup of a great MMA fighter? I will not be going into the technical mastery of various martial arts, but looking at it more from the strength and conditioning coach point of view. An MMA fighter has to be strong enough to dominate the opponent, throw powerful punches and kicks, absorb impact, and be able to resist a constant application of force. He or she has to be powerful and fast, and have enough endurance to be able to perform at high level for five 5-minute rounds. The training program has to address all of the above qualities without compromising one another. This is the beauty of strength and conditioning training for combat sports - as an S&C coach you are a part of a team that creates such a well-rounded athlete.
Stuck at home without any equipment or gym to work with? A true Mixed Martial Artist doesn’t let his surroundings impact his training or spirit. Although we recommend joining an MMA gym, if you aren’t able to do that or if you currently can’t afford an MMA membership, there are still ways to get a good result from a home workout. In this guide, The MMA Guru will show you some of the best ways to get a good MMA/Boxing workout from home without the use of equipment! This is the ultimate MMA workout at home guide.

Zone 3 is called tempo training or intensive endurance training. This zone challenges the upper limits of the aerobic system. Lactate production starts to ramp up at this Zone, however, there is no significant accumulation as intensity is still relatively low and clearance levels are still high due to the adequate of supply of oxygen to the muscles.


Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is another big part of your MMA training. One of the key components of Jiu Jitsu is honing one’s ability to force one’s opponent to the ground. This is especially important if a fighter is smaller than his opponent. Using Jiu Jitsu techniques, a smaller fighter can often overwhelm the opponent using grappling techniques. Jiu-Jitsu offers a variety of methods to get one’s opponent to the mat unlike Greco-Roman wrestling or Judo which rely mainly on takedowns.

ive been working out for awhile and still havent found a routine i like alot that i can do at home, i was wonding if maybe someone could help me out and help me make one, im a 145 pounds looking to get cut and gain some muscle mass, i wanna work out my biceips,triceips,shoulders,chest,abs,back plus get some carido going im looking to do if for 4 days a week if someone would help i would really be thankful.
how long? well ive got about 50 classes under my belt. of that about 40 was pure positional training only; not grappling but holding/passing positions for 2 min rounds eg start in mount/guard/side/knee/bottom and the goal is to maintain and/or submit or if you are on the bottom, reverse and do that as many times within round. its a begginer class pre-req for the advanced program. so with that in mind my technique is far superior than my gas.

Most styles have been adapted from their traditional forms, such as boxing stances, which lack effective counters to leg kicks, the Muay Thai stance, which is poor for defending against takedowns due to its static nature, and Judo or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques, which must be adapted for No Gi competition. It is common for a fighter to train with multiple coaches of different styles or an organized fight team to improve various aspects of their game at once. Cardiovascular conditioning, speed drills, strength training and flexibility are also important aspects of a fighter's training. Some schools advertise their styles as simply "mixed martial arts", which has become a style in itself, but the training will still often be split into different sections.
“Research has shown that the highest percentage of a boxer’s power comes from pushing off his back leg when he throws a punch,” says Giles Wiley, C.S.C.S., a strength coach and former Tae Kwon Do champion in Atlantic Beach, Fl. That means a strong blow comes from coordinating an explosive extension of the leg, torso, and arm. “The K.O. wall press drills that motion.”
NSAC chairman Anthony A. Marnell III: “We will be releasing the Jon Jones tests, but we will not do that until sometime very, very close to the night of the fight. So if you could stop requesting that data from the executive director, it would be helpful because it’s not going to come out until we’re ready to send it out and have all of that properly put together – but it will be published before the fight.” h/t MMAjunkie
Mixed martial arts promotions typically require that male fighters wear shorts in addition to being barechested, thus precluding the use of gi or fighting kimono to inhibit or assist submission holds. Male fighters are required by most athletic commissions to wear groin protectors underneath their trunks.[53] Female fighters wear short shorts and sports bras or other similarly snug-fitting tops. Both male and female fighters are required to wear a mouthguard.[53]

mma training methods

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