Danny Indio is certified as an Apprentice Instructor in Jeet Kune Do Concepts and Filipino Martial Arts under Sifu Dan Anderson (a student of the famous Guro Dan Inosanto) in New York City. He has trained under many instructors, such as Vitor "Shaolin" Ribeiro and Paul Vunak. He is also a Muay Thai instructor. Indio was a Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructor from 2001-2003. He has over ten years of experience teaching martial arts, and has fought—and won—numerous matches in boxing, grappling tournaments and stick fighting competitions.
As of December 2013 WMMAA has 38 member states under its umbrella, in 2017 World MMA Association has 83 members: Afghanistan, Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bulgaria, Canada, Croatia, Colombia, Czech Republic, France, Guatemala, Georgia, Greece, India, Iran, Italy, Kazakhstan, Latvia, Lithuania, Macedonia, Moldova, Monaco, Mongolia, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Senegal, Serbia, Slovakia, South Korea, Spain, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Trinidad and Tobago, Turkey, Ukraine, Uzbekistan, Venezuela.[160]
Originally promoted as a competition to find the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat, competitors from different fighting styles were pitted against one another in contests with relatively few rules.[8] Later, individual fighters incorporated multiple martial arts into their style. MMA promoters were pressured to adopt additional rules to increase competitors' safety, to comply with sport regulations and to broaden mainstream acceptance of the sport.[9] Following these changes, the sport has seen increased popularity with a pay-per-view business that rivals boxing and professional wrestling.[10]
2) Way Down Way Back-Feet spread more than shoulder width apart, torso erect, arms at shoulder height to the sides, elbows bent at right angle with fists pointed up. Bring fists to stomach striking stomach and then immediately bend forward at the waist and lightly striking fists to floor, as you arise, again strike fists to stomach and then return to starting position. This is a ballistic exercise done quickly with intensity and is designed to warm up the shoulders, torso, and stretch the lower body.
Another obvious area of importance for MMA fighters is strength training.  Unlike body builders, most MMA fighters don’t want to lift weights in a manner that will see them bulk up too much. MMA fighters are more interested in gaining strength in multiple muscle groups while also maintaining flexibility to remain competitive in wrestling and grappling.  Many MMA fighters use very basic exercises like push ups, pull ups, squats and other calisthenics in order to work large muscle groups at the same time.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
Include flexibility training to your regimen, but don’t try to be at contortionist. Include stretching into your training regimen, however don’t get hung up on being able to do the splits, put your foot behind your head, or bending yourself like a pretzel. Stretching is good to help prevent injuries, and keep your body more flexible. However don’t tear your muscles and tendons trying to become more flexible. Stretch lightly after your workouts when your body is warm. Don’t stretch before a workout, that is the way to pull or even rip a muscle. Doing most exercises to their full range of motion is a great way to stretch while you are working out. A lot of times you won’t need extra stretching after a workout, but if you feel tight after a workout, that is the best time to lightly stretch.
“In my opinion, real self-defense is more of a mental match up then a physical size match up. Mr. Arnebeck is a unique teacher. I have found him to be very open minded to new ideas and he realizes the only constant is change. I see him as student as well as a teacher and he is constantly adding to his resume and skills by continuing his education. He has been a student of Rickson Gracie (7th degree black belt BJJ) since 1996, and brings in Rodrigo Vaghi (3rd degree black belt BJJ) and Tom Crone (highest ranking Judo Master In MN) to the Warriors Cove for seminars. Its important to me that he continue to provide me with up to date information.”
I currently do 4 days of MMA training, Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri. Im looking for a well balanced gym routine. We do strength training in my gym which we do with bodyweight (pushups, situps, squats, etc) in 2 - 3 min rounds. i tried going to the gym but may have pushed to hard and was out of training for a day. this looks like doable with my schedule, but i want to target more muscle groups.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
Whether you intend to become a newspaper journalist, publishing in print and on the web, or a television reporter, or even an investigative documentarian, a degree in journalism can give you the mix of practical skills and critical knowledge necessary for spreading awareness of racial issues. A strong journalist is not satisfied with merely reporting surface issues, but wants deeper answers, and will do the necessary digging to get them. 

Whilst training and assessing I look at the load, technique, the number of repetitions, and the speed at which the weight is moved, which is very important. All of the above are always logged for the future information. For example, let’s say that Richie deadlifts 80% of his 1RM x 5, but the bar moves slowly. He struggles with the last 2 reps but manages to complete them with correct technique. I have made a note in his training log, “1x 5 @ 80% 1RM DL.” A couple of sessions later, he repeats exactly the same drill, but this time the bar moves quickly. He doesn’t struggle and there is no decrease in the speed at which he moves the bar. Does it mean he got stronger? Yes, but if I only make a note “[email protected]% 1RM DL” it doesn't tell me that there has been an improvement. I must also note the speed of the bar.
Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
That’s why Silva swears by neck ups. To perform the move, grab a weight bench and lay on your back so your head is hanging off of it. Then, use your neck to raise your head up until your chin touches his chest, pausing to squeeze the muscles. Then, lay face down and repeat for another 25 reps, this time lifting your neck up as high as possible. Lay on your left shoulder and repeat, then for your right shoulder.
It's widely known that fights often end before their allotted time limit, either via a knockout (KO) or technical knockout (TKO) by strikes, or by submission (SUB). This differs from other sports such as hockey or basketball where the players are required to play the whole length of the game. In MMA, fighters have the unique ability to control how long the fight lasts. This has huge implications on training strategies as well as damage and concussion mitigation. A fighter could technically never train their conditioning and achieve all their MMA wins by first round knockout... But... we all know that strategy does NOT work against equally-skilled opponents; even the most brutal knockout artists can be taken into deep waters. Professional MMA fighters must have the appropriate amount of conditioning to last at a minimum, 15 minutes. Failing to do so will prevent you from competing at the highest level of the sport.

The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.


Judo is $8 a lesson, no lock in contracts. I can train pretty much anywhere in the world. BUT also some nights I’d rock up and apart from the Sensei I’m the only adult there. Also training with young bucks is annoying because they’re always trying to beat you and don’t appreciate I’m over 40 and don’t bounce back from injuries nor can I afford them.
What to expect: At the core of most jiu jitsu training is what’s called “rolling,” which is basically wrestling. You’ll either be rolling gi—in which you wear a traditional uniform—or no gi, which usually just involves a pair of shorts and a T-shirt. And while some of it may look like they’re “just laying there,” it’s extremely fatiguing on just about every muscle in the body. Think Pilates in attack mode. It’ll also give you an iron grip.
Regulated mixed martial arts competitions were first introduced in the United States by CV Productions, Inc.. Its first competition, called Tough Guy Contest was held on March 20, 1980, New Kensington, Pennsylvania, Holiday Inn. During that year the company renamed the brand to Super Fighters and sanctioned ten regulated tournaments in Pennsylvania. In 1983, Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill that specifically called for: "Prohibiting Tough Guy contests or Battle of the Brawlers contests", and ended the sport.[5][6][38] In 1993, the sport was reintroduced to the United States by the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC).[39] The sport gained international exposure and widespread publicity when jiu-jitsu fighter Royce Gracie won the first Ultimate Fighting Championship tournament, submitting three challengers in a total of just five minutes.[40] sparking a revolution in martial arts.[41][42]
Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.

Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.
What? Self defence is for everyone no matter the gender and size or height. I have experienced bullying in shape and form even domestic violence. I do four styles of mma and I train with men in my dojo and I am respected and treated as an equal because I can fight. It won’t matter where anyone moves to. Trouble and danger is everywhere. Offenders attack those who can’t defend themselves and don’t matter what area you’re from or visiting.
Phoenix welcomes owner of Trooper Fitness Studio, Prince Brathwaite and certified personal trainer and former competitive bodybuilder, Albert Gonzalez to the podcast. In part one of this two part series, the three preach the importance of having a fitness plan and believing in the numbers. With decades of fitness experience between them, Prince and Albert shed light on the importance of rest and recovery, the difference between training for health, sport or ideal body and what the formula is for each. Learn how to set your fitness goals in episode 67 of In Fighting Shape.
wocyru01.. its pain that I get in the shins.. about 1 inch above and 1 inch in front of the ankle bone... i had it in the past which started at 6 months after running 5 miles everyday. Ive been ok the past 3 weeks, until last night... my shin started hurting and I had to stop running and instead use the bike. my reasearch indicates its either overtraining.. or bad form.. my guess is its the latter as it takes time to develope.. comments??

In May 2016, CBS was in final negotiations with Christine Baranski to reprise her role as Diane Lockhart and Cush Jumbo to reprise her role as well.[4] After the series was picked up, it was announced that Jumbo would reprise her role as Lucca Quinn.[7] Deadline announced on September 17, 2016 that Sarah Steele had been added to the cast, returning as Marissa Gold and appearing as Diane Lockhart's secretary-turned-investigator.[9] On October 12, 2016, it was announced that former Game of Thrones star Rose Leslie had been cast to play a lead in the show, the role of Diane's goddaughter Maia who joins Diane's firm just after passing the bar.[5]
Is it for you? If you crave contact, this is for you. There’s a lot of twisting and striking, so it’s great for your core and requires strong joints. But, all of that contact means you’ll be leaving classes with bruises. And when you get to the higher levels, the tests get to be fights. But, on the list, it’s the most practical and involves very little ground game if that’s not your thing. Just don’t expect to find any Krav Maga tournaments to participate in.
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.

Want to Fight?  In addition to our public MMA classes we also have one of the area’s best MMA fight-team that includes both professional and amateur fighters.  Our training area features a Zebra Mat cage, Zebra Mats, and heavy bags.  Most importantly there are many good training partners including black belt jiu jitsu competitors, NCAA Div I wrestlers, and experienced boxers and Muay Thai competitors. We have structured practice and technical coaching support for our team.  We also have access to the best fighters in the world.  We often send our members to NYC, Philadelphia, and California for special training camps.


In Ancient Greece, there was a sport called pankration, which featured a combination of grappling and striking skills similar to those found in modern MMA. Pankration was formed by a combination of the already established wrestling and boxing traditions and, in Olympic terms, first featured in the 33rd Olympiad in 648 BC. All strikes and holds were allowed with the exception of biting and gouging, which were banned. The fighters, called pankratiasts, fought until someone could not continue or signaled submission by raising their index finger; there were no rounds.[11][12] According to E. Norman Gardiner, 'No branch of athletics was more popular than the pankration.'[13] From its origins in Ancient Greece, pankration was later passed on to the Romans.[14]
Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
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