We’re confident you’ll love your Onnit supplements. If the product doesn't perform for you, however, we’re not gonna play games with you. Order any of our entry size supplements, and if you don’t like it, you can keep it! Notify our team, telling us why it wasn't a fit for you, and we’ll get you a refund right there on the spot - no return necessary. We just ask that you try it out for at least two weeks to give it a fair shot.

For many years, professional MMA competitions were illegal in Canada. Section 83(2) of the Canadian Criminal Code deemed that only boxing matches where only fists are used are considered legal.[208][209] However most provinces regulated it by a provincial athletic commission (skirting S. 83(2) by classifying MMA as "mixed boxing"),[210] such as the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario,[211] Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Northwest Territories. The legality of MMA in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and New Brunswick varies depending on the municipality.[212][213] Professional MMA competitions remain illegal in the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Yukon, and Nunavut because it is not regulated by an athletic commission.

The reason why we use the wording “Lead” and “Rear” instead of “Left” and “Right” is because when switching stances this can get confusing. Someone who is trying to master all styles of fighting should be able to fight in both Orthodox (Left foot first) and Southpaw (Right foot first). This is obviously better suited for MMA because it gives your opponent a different look for takedowns, while in boxing you’re only using punches and most boxers preferably only master one stance.
In March 1997, the Iowa Athletic Commission officially sanctioned Battlecade Extreme Fighting under a modified form of its existing rules for Shootfighting. These rules created the three 5 minute round, one-minute break format, and mandated shootfighting gloves, as well as weight classes, for the first time. Illegal blows were listed as groin strikes, head butting, biting, eye gouging, hair pulling, striking an opponent with an elbow while the opponent is on the mat, kidney strikes, and striking the back of the head with closed fist. Holding onto the ring or cage for any reason was defined as a foul.[50][51] While there are minor differences between these and the final Unified Rules, notably regarding elbow strikes, the Iowa rules allowed mixed martial arts promoters to conduct essentially modern events legally, anywhere in the state. On March 28, 1997, Extreme Fighting 4 was held under these rules, making it the first show conducted under a version of the modern rules.
Pride is Fit to Fight®’s exclusive kids training program. This program provides an enriching, safe and unique martial arts experience designed solely for children. Pride offers kids an exciting and varied curriculum, exposing kids to Muay Thai, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Krav Maga, sports conditioning and more! This program allows kids to be well-rounded martial artists and community members. Pride is based on the coming together of the emotional and physical needs that are actually manifest in the lives of our children today as opposed to watered down promises often mistakenly associated with Traditional Martial Arts, that are so rarely delivered.
But just because it's a straightforward workout, that doesn't mean you should take it lightly. Camozzi stresses that you should push yourself, working at a quick pace with fast punches and lots of footwork. "You will feel it in your legs after the shadowboxing, and that's what we want," he says. "Picture yourself in the ring fighting. No dropping your hands or walking around and throwing a combo here and there."

Muay Thai is the kickboxing style most commonly used in professional Mixed Martial Arts (UFC) style competitions. It is known as the “Art of 8 Limbs” because it allows use of punches, kicks, elbows, and knees—making it the most versatile and effective striking system on the planet. Even better, it is a great workout and not boring—this motivates people who normally hate going to the gym and gets them working out!


What is it? The literal Hebrew translation of Krav Maga is “battle contact” and we can’t think of a better description. It was developed by the Israeli Defense Force to be used in real-life combat situations. In addition to punches, kicks and throws, it teaches real-life scenarios like how to disarm an attacker. Rubber knives and guns will make appearances.
3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.
It is so effective in fact, it is considered to be required training for anyone who chooses to compete in the world renowned Ultimate Fighting Championships. Every single UFC Champion trains in Jiu-Jitsu or grappling. Bottom line, what you are going to learn in our Jiu-Jitsu classes works because its what professional fighters rely on when they step into the cage.
The Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan caters to flyers who frequent various destinations in Alaska, West Coast cities (like Seattle and Portland, Oregon), major transportation hubs (like Atlanta and New York City), as well as destinations in Canada, Mexico and Costa Rica. By joining the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, you can start earning miles on every Alaska Airlines flight you take and eligible flights on Alaska Airlines' 17 partner airlines, including American Airlines, Emirates and British Airways. You can also earn miles by making everyday purchases with the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card or by staying with seven participating hotel partners, including Best Western, InterContinental and Marriott. The miles you earn can be used toward free flights on Alaska Airlines and other participating carriers, partner hotel stays, magazine subscriptions or donations to charity.

Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is another big part of your MMA training. One of the key components of Jiu Jitsu is honing one’s ability to force one’s opponent to the ground. This is especially important if a fighter is smaller than his opponent. Using Jiu Jitsu techniques, a smaller fighter can often overwhelm the opponent using grappling techniques. Jiu-Jitsu offers a variety of methods to get one’s opponent to the mat unlike Greco-Roman wrestling or Judo which rely mainly on takedowns.
Edit: After speaking to a respected S&C coach that trains elite fighters, he and I both came to the conclusion that I have overstated the importance of lower intensity aerobic development, causing some of my points to be flat out wrong. MMA is no doubt an anaerobic sport - a comprehensive review of the literature on combat sports suggest that anaerobic capacity (lower end, longer bouts of anaerobic efforts) is what distinguishes high level fighters, to lower level competitors. I still believe a solid aerobic base should be possessed and the conditioning work should compliment MMA training. If MMA training lacks anaerobic capacity work, conditioning must address this. If MMA training has sufficient anaerobic capacity work, a S&C coach should preserve these adaptations. 
One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
“I grew up playing sports my whole life. I played soccer, baseball, hockey and football. After high school I started putting on a lot of weight from being inactive. Joe and I found the Cove and the rest was history. I went from being over 250 lbs to 215 in the first 3 months. Now I fight at 185 lbs., planning on dropping to 170. I owe it all to Mr. Arnebeck and the Warrior’s Cove. The training at the Warriors Cove is intelligent, safe and effective. It is not a “tough guy” school like so many others that are out there nowadays. You are taught the very core of Jiu Jitsu and stand up fighting (striking, clinching and takedowns) which is the most important (I always preach fundamentals). Everybody at the Cove is friendly and always willing to help each other, and when needed, willing to push each other, challenge each other and help each other grow, not only as martial artists but as human beings as well.”

Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
Ross training shows you how to make sandbags, but I have an easier/cheaper way. Just buy a $10 exercise ball and fill it up with water. Submerge to pump, you'll figure it out. I filled mine halfway, about 60#s. You can do Tabata front squats or cleans. They're pretty killer. So much so that I stopped doing them. But maybe you'll have more mental fortitue than I.
Is it for you? It’s a close-combat system, so if you have issues with personal space or slow reflexes, this will be a particularly bad choice. There are very few kicks involved (most of the time) so if you’re looking to use your legs, you’ll likely be better somewhere else. And many of the forms are extremely tough on the forearms—especially the ones with the wooden dummy—so be prepared to wear a long-sleeved shirt to work for a while. But, if you’re trying to improve your balance and concentration, it’s a great choice.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.

Our MMA classes are open all levels of experience.  The  format is primarily learning the technical aspects of MMA with little live training and no sparring.  All serious MMA fighters train in various specific disciplines. These usually include Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Wrestling, Boxing, and others.  Today, some gyms and martial arts schools teach pieces of these various arts and call it MMA Training.  In our classes we focus on techniques specific to MMA. An example is controlling an opponent against the cage.  Our cirriculum is based on techniques and methods used by Renzo Gracie’s world class team.
Maia Rindell arrives at her new firm trying to ignore multiple anonymous calls and texts from angry clients of her father, who swear revenge for the money he stole from them. She meets Julius Cain, a managing partner, and Lucca Quinn, a third year associate. Cain brings all the lower level associates to a local union headquarters to offer free legal advice as part of their retainer with the union. While there, Maia ends up taking the case of Frank Gwynn, a man who is unfairly having his wages garnished due to charges of theft from his place of work. Meanwhile, Diane is visited by Maia's mother, Lenore, who asks Diane to meet with her husband, Henry. Lenore claims that they are innocent of the charges, laying the blame on their business partner, Jax, Henry's brother.During arbitration, Maia loses the case, but Lucca steps in to accuse the company of false imprisonment, as they had detained Frank for seven hours to question him about the theft. When the firm decides that the case is too small to invest resources in, Lucca proposes that they open a class action lawsuit against multiple companies who have garnished wages after accusing their employees of theft. Meanwhile, Diane moves into her new office, assisted by Marissa Gold, who has been demoted at Diane's old firm. Marissa decides to help with the class action in hopes of being hired as Diane's new assistant. She tracks down multiple employees who have had their wages garnished and adds them to the suit. Grateful, Diane accepts Marissa as her new assistant. Diane meets with Henry in jail, who claims that Jax framed him to escape prosecution. Diane promises to look into the matter, and as they part ways, Henry mentions that Lenore has terminal breast cancer. At Frank's trial, the prosecution uncovers evidence that Frank had been involved in an earlier theft at a previous job, casting doubt on his story. Frank loses his case, and the loss causes the firm to pull out of the class action lawsuit.Maia learns of her mother's condition from Diane, and despite her lawyer's advice to stay away from her parents to avoid being caught up in their financial scandal, she visits her. However, Maia learns that her mother lied about the cancer so that she would come see her. Although angry at her mother, Diane advises Maia to forgive her, since she is obviously lonely with Henry in jail. Maia visits her mother to make amends, but discovers her mother carrying on an affair with her uncle Jax.
The first thing you should always do is start your MMA workout with some shadow boxing. This is done best in front of a mirror so that you can see your style of striking and the improvements you need to make while striking. If you’re new to shadow boxing, a good rule of thumb is to always finish your punching combinations with knees or kicks. If you’re a boxer then don’t worry about knees or kicks, just work on your punching combinations and your flow. Visualize the opponent in front of you and moved to create angles that could be used in a real life situation. Don’t be stagnant with your movement, allow yourself to be comfortable so that you can become more confident with your flow.
Training and strengthening the core especially correlates to the cage when he’s on the ground, according to Jackson. “In Brazilian jujitsu, if somebody is laying on top of you and you got to get up, your core gets tired,” he admitted. “If I haven’t been working on my core, it’s harder to get up off your back because your core fatigues. You get tired and it takes a lot of core to do certain moves and get out of moves. That’s why a strong core is important.” Plus, Jackson says, “I think I read in Men’s Health that if you have [strong] abs, you live longer and stuff.” (He’s right! We did say that.)
We offer a revolutionary approach to Mixed Martial Arts that you won’t find anywhere else! Our MMA is unique because it not only offers the rules based Sport MMA training that became popular in the 1990′s, but more importantly, we also teach Combat MMA optimized for the realities of no rules self defense fighting! We also correct many mistakes that can be found in MMA training today.
Today’s session is still a part of the strength cycle, but the load is not sufficient for strength development. For us, strength phase is all about getting the athlete stronger through improvement of various qualities. Today, as it is our third strength and conditioning session this week, we have decreased the intensity and will now focus on improving mobility and structural awareness, which will help you tolerate a heavier load.

I just read that this a good hobble for dudes but what about girls? I agree that this type of fighting would be more a use to me because it combines all the styles of fighting. As a female I don’t want to depend on someone on helping when I am in trouble. I mean, that would be nice but the changes of that happening are unlikely. I want to learn how to fight. No, I don’t have a bully or anyone that I want to fight. My only motivation is to learn.
So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?
10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.
Include flexibility training to your regimen, but don’t try to be at contortionist. Include stretching into your training regimen, however don’t get hung up on being able to do the splits, put your foot behind your head, or bending yourself like a pretzel. Stretching is good to help prevent injuries, and keep your body more flexible. However don’t tear your muscles and tendons trying to become more flexible. Stretch lightly after your workouts when your body is warm. Don’t stretch before a workout, that is the way to pull or even rip a muscle. Doing most exercises to their full range of motion is a great way to stretch while you are working out. A lot of times you won’t need extra stretching after a workout, but if you feel tight after a workout, that is the best time to lightly stretch.
Sambo, a martial art and combat sport developed in Russia in the early 1920s, merged various forms of combat styles such as wrestling, judo and striking into one unique martial art.[21][22] The popularity of professional wrestling, which was contested under various catch wrestling rules at the time, waned after World War I, when the sport split into two genres: "shoot", in which the fighters actually competed, and "show", which evolved into modern professional wrestling.[23] In 1936, heavyweight boxing contender Kingfish Levinsky and veteran Catch wrestler Ray Steele competed in a mixed match, which Steele won in 35 seconds.[23] 

Horrible workout. Clearly not designed by someone training ANY martial arts. Too many bodybuilding esque isolation exercises. Waaaaay to much shoulder work especially AFTER benching !! Shrugs ??!?! Most useless exercise in the book? Any MMA fighter should be periodising ther workouts anyway as there's too much to do at once". As your sport requires FULL BODY MOVEMENTS, you should stick to olympic lifts + bench + pull ups + sprints.
I have been practising jiu-jitsu from the age of 9-16, but decided to crosstrain with kyokushinkai karate when i was 13, as jiu-jitsu doesn’t teach you how do punch or kick realistic. I plan on training taekwondo for the kicking distance, wing chun for the punching distance and bujinkan for ground, weapon and grappling distance. Bruce Lee himself trained the arts separately and extracted what was useful from them. I plan on doing sparring sessions with MMA-guys once a week, as none of the abovementioned arts spare on all levels in fighting.
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
The Body Action System (B.A.S – get it?) is Bas Rutten’s MMA workout program and equipment . A big problem with a lot of workouts is they become stale, but Bas keeps things interesting and fun. Admittedly, this is one of those crazy late-night infomercial things that you order when you’re drunk. So, if you’re drunk right now, definitely buy this. As for for actual B.A.S. itself, it’s easier to just take a look at the picture below.
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."
These fighters will often study submission wrestling to avoid being forced into submission should they find themselves on the ground. This style can be deceptively different from traditional kickboxing styles, since sprawl-and-brawlers must adapt their techniques to incorporate takedown and ground fighting defense. A few notable examples are Igor Vovchanchyn, Mirko Filipović, Chuck Liddell, Mark Hunt and more recently Junior dos Santos, Andrei Arlovski.[124] and Joanna Jedrzejczyk.[125]
In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.
3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.

While mixed martial arts was initially practiced almost exclusively by competitive fighters, this is no longer the case. As the sport has become more mainstream and more widely taught, it has become accessible to wider range of practitioners of all ages. Proponents of this sort of training argue that it is safe for anyone, of any age, with varying levels of competitiveness and fitness.[95][96]
Bang away at this big bastard and take out all of your frustrations. Imagine that the bag is your boss or wife and mix in jabs, combinations and even haymakers on it. Even punching at a moderate pace will make you keep thinking to yourself, “When is that fuckin’ bell going to ring?” This is a workout in itself and will help with punching power and bracing your body when your fist makes contact with a solid object.
Strength and conditioning is essential, but beware! Not all workouts are created equal. Make sure to find a good coach that can help you develop a plan that fits your needs, schedule, and helps you reach your goals. It doesn’t matter if you can bench press a house or throw 300 lbs over your head 100 times. MMA requires mobility, stability, strength, speed, and power that can be maintained over time and in a variety of positions. It is a unique set of demands that most programs never address completely.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!

Brazilian Jiu-jitsu is a grappling-based fighting style that focuses on incapacitating opponents through the use of leverage against weak areas of the body. It has become an absolute necessity for survival in the cage, and has on countless occasions proven how effective the submission game can be. It is also an accepted truth that almost all street altercations will involve some sort of grappling (standing or on the ground). This is why Combat Jiu Jitsu is a cornerstone of our training for mixed martial arts and self-defense. All our Jiu-jitsu classes are oriented towards self defense and MMA competition, NOT SPORT GRAPPLING. Meaning we ALWAYS add striking and striking defense while on the ground. A emphasis is put on defending strikes and clinching while attacking. Most of our classes are practiced in a ‘No-Gi’ format, which means students wear rashguards and shorts.

Food is fuel, period. Feed your body good fuel and it will perform better. Stronger bones, quicker muscle recovery, strength, reduced inflammation, higher energy levels, and many other benefits come from eating healthier. One of the easiest ways to change your eating is to become conscious of everything that goes in your mouth. I’m not a psychologist, but somehow writing it down makes you see the difference between what you thought you were doing and what you were actually doing. Write it down!
Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit. 
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