At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon!
Adrian, Thanks for reaching out. After watching and dealing with full time fighters for many years, I personally think that you are smart for having a full time job. Most of the full time guys struggle with finances and consistency, so youre ahead of the curve. Do you train every evening? What is your current goal? Are you training for a fight or a tournament?
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.
I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
There are plenty of variations on the phrase, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” There is good reason for that: it is fundamentally true. Ignorance of history begets further ignorance in the present. Racism, hate, fear, and violence repeat, if not intensify, when we ignore the lessons that history holds for us. If we do not want to repeat the mistakes of our forbears, we must study them and grow from the experience.
Educators are in a unique position to fight racism by giving others the skills to improve their own quality of life or employ their knowledge to confront racism in its many forms. This is not limited to the classroom. You can use your knowledge as an educator to help others through volunteer work, and tutoring, such as with refugees who need to learn English as a second language in order to get ahead, or with underprivileged kids who need assistance that their own schools do not offer.
The Kickboxing program is incredible at the Easton gym. It's much more than just a full-body workout, it teaches you how to find strength within yourself. I came into the program not realizing what I was getting into. It turns out I was jumping into a passion that I am excited to pursue every single day. Unlike other gyms with weight machines, Easton has classes throughout the day with coaches that are extremely knowledgeable and great at what they do. They push you to perform your best, and you always walk away feeling great. Every member and coach in this gym is fantastic, and it really feels like a family here.
Eat like a modern day Caveman. Try and stick with the basic primitive food groups such as meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, but don’t get neurotic. What I mean by that is, try to be very mindful of what you’re eating, and though you probably don’t need that extra piece of bread, or potato, it won’t be the end of the world if you eat it, and you do only live once. So unless you are training for an event where you have to lose weight, eat clean for the bulk of your meals, but don’t deprive yourself of some of your simple dietary pleasures.
With a degree in education, you'll create numerous opportunities to enact change. You can teach at high schools and middle schools, helping troubled youth navigate the complexities of racial issues in society. You can teach elementary and preschools, and help young children develop strong morals and values that combat the ideologies of racism from early on.
The isolation phase is where a practitioner improves the mechanics and qualities of a technique and learns to apply it against an opponent. It can involve a variety of training methods including solo practice in the air or on pads/bags/shields, limited or prearranged drilling with a partner against a prearranged attack or response, and live training within a limited technical context. Isolation phase training is done forever, both to improve the execution of techniques and to increase qualities such as speed, power, and timing.
Mixed martial arts appear everywhere. For example, mixed martial arts events and personalities appear in just about every magazine such as GQ, Newsweek, Time, Playboy as well as smaller publications like Black Belt Magazine (for a complete list of mixed martial arts magazines, see my list below). Mixed martial arts also frequently appear in television shows, xbox games and movies. Mixed martial arts have their reality TV shows such as Tapout, The Ultimate Fighter and Caged that focus exclusively on the life of mixed martial arts personalities. Mixed martial arts also have their own unique workout gear and clothing line such as Tapout, Bad Boy MMA, Affliction, Cage Fighter and Xtreme Couture. For better or worse, it seems like mixed martial arts has taken over the world.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice. 
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