The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
Boxers undergo some of the most intense training to prepare for just minutes in the ring. Sure, lifting weights and running endless miles will do the trick, but lets be real, nothing feels better than sweating it out like a true badass. Treadmills and stairmasters are child’s play in comparison to banging out a few rounds of speed rope or deadly one-two combinations.
They say that boxing is dead and MMA is holding the smoking gun pointed towards it. While the “sweet science of pugilism” has certainly seen better days and it’s cage fighting brother sport has made major strides in the last decade, boxing is far from gone and certainly not forgotten. And it has had a boost in popularity due to a new organization, BKB, in which the fighters have to be in top shape due to the size – or lack thereof – of the fighting arena.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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