Dom Tsui has been writing professionally since 2000. He wrote for the award-winning magazine, "Pi," and his articles about health and fitness, style and confidence appear on various websites. Tsui works as a lifestyle and confidence consultant and kickboxing instructor. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from University College in London.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]

Team Quest MMA & Fitness Portland is a world leader in mixed martial arts training and we are experts in boxing classes & boxing training for all skill levels. No matter if you are a beginner or pro, our boxing program at Team Quest MMA will challenge you, help you lose weight, get in shape fast and learn realistic boxing with fast paced drills and awesome work out partners. 
Phoenix welcomes owner of Trooper Fitness Studio, Prince Brathwaite and certified personal trainer and former competitive bodybuilder, Albert Gonzalez to the podcast. In part one of this two part series, the three preach the importance of having a fitness plan and believing in the numbers. With decades of fitness experience between them, Prince and Albert shed light on the importance of rest and recovery, the difference between training for health, sport or ideal body and what the formula is for each. Learn how to set your fitness goals in episode 67 of In Fighting Shape.

How to: Start off on all fours. Lift your knees off the floor and raise your hips slightly, bracing your core as you do so. That’s the “bear” position! Keeping your shoulders and hips at the same height, step forward with your right foot while reaching forward with your right hand. Repeat on the left side and continue moving forward, building speed as you go. Roaring is optional.
The added incline increases the resistance and makes sure you’re recruiting the fast-twitch fibers during the exercise – if they aren’t recruited, their endurance won’t improve. You’ll want to select a resistance that slows the movement down to somewhere between 70-80% of the speed you’d be able to go with no resistance at all. A general rule of thumb is to use somewhere between 20-40% of the maximum resistance, but this really depends on the specific exercise(s) you choose to use for these intervals.

Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
Simply learning how to use a fighting stance is not enough to win a fight. You will need to remember to stick to the fundamental techniques of self defense. For example, always keep both of your hands up when fighting with your opponent. Avoid the natural tendency to lower your hands when fighting. This will leave you wide open to a possible counter attack in a hand to hand combat situation. Remember, when executing a punch or strike to always keep your other hand up to either defend against a counter strike or follow up with another strike. One of the best ways to train yourself to keep your hands up when fighting is through simulated street fighting, full contact sparring sessions and punching bag workouts.
During the late 1960s to early 1970s, the concept of combining the elements of multiple martial arts was popularized in the West by Bruce Lee via his system of Jeet Kune Do. Lee believed that "the best fighter is not a Boxer, Karate or Judo man. The best fighter is someone who can adapt to any style, to be formless, to adopt an individual's own style and not following the system of styles." In 2004, UFC President Dana White would call Lee the "father of mixed martial arts" stating: "If you look at the way Bruce Lee trained, the way he fought, and many of the things he wrote, he said the perfect style was no style. You take a little something from everything. You take the good things from every different discipline, use what works, and you throw the rest away".[27]
Mixed martial arts are extremely popular nowadays, but in actuality MMA has been around for a very long time. As a matter of fact, mixed martial arts date back to the Greco-Roman era where the ancient martial art Penetration appeared in the Olympic Games. Many historians agree that the mixed martial arts of ancient Greece and very similar to the mixed martial arts of modern day. However, mixed martial arts of today are considered to be one of the most regulated and controlled sports in the world.
MMA is a fighting style that requires more than one person to properly train. However, certain warm-ups and practices can be done alone to increase speed and accuracy of technique for fundamental movements, such as shadow boxing, using dummies or punching bags for grappling movements and striking, and practicing footwork. Another core element of MMA is cardio, so that you don't get tired out in the ring.

Is it for you? If you crave contact, this is for you. There’s a lot of twisting and striking, so it’s great for your core and requires strong joints. But, all of that contact means you’ll be leaving classes with bruises. And when you get to the higher levels, the tests get to be fights. But, on the list, it’s the most practical and involves very little ground game if that’s not your thing. Just don’t expect to find any Krav Maga tournaments to participate in.
The sport reached a new peak of popularity in North America in December 2006: a rematch between then UFC light heavyweight champion Chuck Liddell and former champion Tito Ortiz, rivaled the PPV sales of some of the biggest boxing events of all time,[44] and helped the UFC's 2006 PPV gross surpass that of any promotion in PPV history. In 2007, Zuffa LLC, the owners of the UFC MMA promotion, bought Japanese rival MMA brand Pride FC, merging the contracted fighters under one promotion.[45] Comparisons were drawn to the consolidation that occurred in other sports, such as the AFL-NFL Merger in American football.[46]
Alvarez is just the latest boxing star closely associated with HBO. Others who made their name or who had mega fights with the network's backing include Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Oscar De La Hoya, Manny Pacquiao, Floyd Mayweather, Jones Jr., Lennox Lewis, Bernard Hopkins, Wladimir Klitschko, Miguel Cotto, Arturo Gatti, Erik Morales, Marco Antonio Barrera, Juan Manuel Marquez, Felix Trinidad, Shane Mosley, Pernell Whitaker, Julio Cesar Chavez Sr., Sugar Ray Leonard, Marvin Hagler, Thomas Hearns, Roberto Duran and Larry Holmes.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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