As a veteran fighter, the 6-1, 265-pound Jackson has a painful admission to make. “I suck at jumping rope for some reason,” he claimed. Perhaps it’s the volume that challenges him, as his coach will have him doing anywhere from three five-minute rounds to 10 five-minute rounds, “depending on how pissed he is at me.” To put the latter into perspective, a Bellator title match lasts for five five-minute rounds (normal matches are three rounds), so 10 five-minute rounds of jumping rope is double the time of a fight. Obviously, jumping rope helps fighters with their conditioning, but Jackson credits the age-old training method for improving his agility and footwork as well.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.

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