Education is the greatest weapon against ignorance. By studying education and becoming an educator, you have the ability to arm the next generation of Americans with knowledge and to instill in them the critical capacities to fight racism themselves. You can help stop the spread of ignorance, and simultaneously, create new allies in the march of progress.
Integrate explosive resistance training. Fighter training is all about explosive power, and resistance training is an effective way to improve this. Granted, every weightlifting session doesn't have to focus on power, but try to incorporate this type of training, utilizing plyometrics, such as box jumps or medicine ball thrusts, or powerlifting techniques, once or twice a week. Perform two to four sets of six to 10 reps for each plyometric exercise.

Wrestling is another huge component of MMA training. If you have watched even one MMA match, you can clearly see the advantage of having strong wrestling skills. Being able to take down an opponent and pin them to the mat is huge. Greco-Roman wrestling is one of the most ancient sports, so while MMA might seem like something new, it is truly comprised of a variety of ancient fighting techniques.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
If you are interested in taking one or more classes at the Warrior’s Cove, you may visit to observe the classes. We have a seating area for visitors. You may also participate in one free class – in each program that we offer.  You will find our instructors and the other members to be friendly, informative, and supportive. Simply fill out the GET YOUR FREE TRIAL form above to get started today!
Dom Tsui has been writing professionally since 2000. He wrote for the award-winning magazine, "Pi," and his articles about health and fitness, style and confidence appear on various websites. Tsui works as a lifestyle and confidence consultant and kickboxing instructor. He holds a Bachelor of Arts in English literature from University College in London.
Mixed martial arts, or MMA, is an exciting fighting sport that showcases a variety of martial arts disciplines from around the world. Contemporary MMA fighters must become proficient in striking skills, grappling, and wrestling. To start training in MMA, you'll need to sign up for classes and hone your newly learned skills with consistent practice. With the right level of dedication and skill, you can to train and compete at a high level.
Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!

Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.
As boxing continues to evolve in mixed martial arts (MMA), so do the training methods employed. Absent from many MMA gyms is one of the most fundamental techniques used in boxing for more than a century–shadow boxing. If you are a fighter and you want to bring your boxing to the next level quickly, you must consistently incorporate shadow boxing into your training regimen. Below we will provide the rationale along with some basic strategies for getting the most out of your shadow boxing. If you shadow box regularly under the watchful eye of an expert boxing coach, you may want to stop reading here. If not, keep reading!
I enjoyed your views on this. I am a very strong 5’8″ female 170lbs I am a hell of a street fighter/boxer I would love to be more creative such as mma, problem where i live not alot options. Fighting has always been a goal of mine. I was very very fit after 2 kids I am trying get toned again. Training is very helpful again not alot options where I live currently. And yes I agree women love to see violence I don’t just enjoy watching. It’s a great learning skill for me. I was always told women can’t so anything,but I have proven over amd over again this isn’t true. Do you have any suggestion on home training without tons equipment that would be great for someone like me? And I see there is many ignorant people on this site. Haha 5 foot tall fighting a women my size and skill wouldn’t do no justice with why ever training she has it would be ignorant of her to raise her hand to anyone. I have fought men and I wouldn’t suggest she involve her self in suckle stupidity she could end up dead or hospital. I had my jaw broke by boxing with a very well trained built man girl walk away go anger management!
Also, if it happens that you pushed too hard (which most likely will happen or has already happened to all of us at some point), make a note in the training log and adjust the intensity. The more you know your athlete, the more you can fine-tune the training. This is why I do not believe in six of eight week training camps. To know your athlete well, you need to work with them on a regular basis.
If a fighter has been doing two workouts per day for a month straight, has poor nutrition, doesn’t sleep much, and is stressed out, the last thing he needs is a ball-busting, crusher workout that is just going to break him down even more. Remember, these guys are punching each other in the face, taking each other down, and tying each other into knots. They are always banged up somewhere.
At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon!
Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.

Our instructors are professionals who are passionate about MMA Competition and training. They are some of the area’s best and most exciting fighters but most importantly they are excellent at conveying their knowledge to students.  Our reputation is built on great instruction, so we are very proud of the quality of classes and practices facilitated by our instructors.
In general, fighters who cannot win fights through lightning offense, or are more suited to win fights in the later rounds or via decision are commonly known as grinders. Grinders aim to shut down their opponent's game plan and chip away at them via clinching, smothering and ground-and-pound for most of the rounds. Prominent examples of grinders are Pat Healy,[143] and Chael Sonnen.[144]

No-holds-barred fighting reportedly took place in the late 1880s when wrestlers representing style of Catch wrestling and many others met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe. In the USA, the first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight world boxing champion, entered the ring with his trainer, wrestling champion William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. In September 1901, Frank "Paddy" Slavin, who had been a contender for Sullivan's boxing title, knocked out future world wrestling champion Frank Gotch in Dawson City, Canada.[17] The judo-practitioner Ren-nierand, who gained fame after defeating George Dubois, would fight again in another similar contest, which he lost to Ukrainian Catch wrestler Ivan Poddubny.[16]


Bring a training partner with you to practice and spar. Having a training partner, preferably another MMA fighter, can provide a source of motivation to work out every day. If you want to practice sparring, you could also do so with your partner. If you know any other martial arts students or have an athletic friend, ask them to train with you at least once or twice a week to reap the benefits of a partner.[5]
I was greeted by a man named David Arnebeck. I could tell that he had a fighters build and an abundance of confidence. He made me feel at ease as we discussed my martial arts history and goals. I told him that I had taken 4 years of Tae Kwon Do but still felt as thought I was no good in a ‘real’ situation. I was good at forms but lacked the real sparring experience. He told me that many students at Warrior’s Cove had joined because of the ‘true to life’ training. He said, ‘kicking the air will do you no good.’  He said many things that I also heard from Bruce Lee’s fighting philosophy. He had me convinced. I joined that week. I have now found what seems to be the most effective form of self defense and exercise.
Get plenty of rest. Your body breaks down considerably during heavy workouts, both mentally and physically. Getting adequate rest, is an essential part of any effective workout regiment. Whether you are training for a UFC title fight, or you are training to get into great shape, you need adequate rest to re-build and revitalize your mind and your body. Getting adequate rest includes, but is not limited to getting a good nights sleep, trying to take short naps, meditate throughout the day, and taking days off of training.
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).

Spirit Airlines' Free Spirit frequent flyer program caters to people who travel domestically all over the United States, including cities like Los Angeles, Chicago, Baltimore, Dallas-Fort Worth and Fort Lauderdale, Florida. Free Spirit is also advantageous for travelers who visit Latin American and Caribbean destinations like Aruba, Jamaica, Lima, Peru, and Costa Rica. As a Free Spirit member, you'll earn miles every time you fly with Spirit Airlines. You can also collect miles for everyday purchases if you hold a Spirit Airlines World Mastercard. Plus, Spirit Airlines has partnerships with select restaurants, Choice Hotels, car rental agencies and more, which allow you to earn miles for dining, hotel stays, cruise vacations and car rentals.
Knowing that a client's fitness level and lifestyle will most likely differ from that of a professional athlete, it's important to make the necessary adjustments to a training routine. Are these big adjustments? Absolutely not. Professionals in many ways are like the rest of us: their bodies can get better and stronger with squats, deadlifts, push-ups and pull-ups.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]

The lactate threshold also represents the switch from using predominantly aerobic metabolism, to anaerobic metabolism. This is where the mental toughness and resilience of a fighter becomes more important. The fighters with the ability to push through the pain while maintaining their martial arts technique, will likely be the winner. In order to effectively delay the onset of muscular and mental fatigue, the goal of every fight should be to increase their lactate threshold.
Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
The Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan caters to flyers who frequent various destinations in Alaska, West Coast cities (like Seattle and Portland, Oregon), major transportation hubs (like Atlanta and New York City), as well as destinations in Canada, Mexico and Costa Rica. By joining the Alaska Airlines Mileage Plan, you can start earning miles on every Alaska Airlines flight you take and eligible flights on Alaska Airlines' 17 partner airlines, including American Airlines, Emirates and British Airways. You can also earn miles by making everyday purchases with the Alaska Airlines Visa Signature Card or by staying with seven participating hotel partners, including Best Western, InterContinental and Marriott. The miles you earn can be used toward free flights on Alaska Airlines and other participating carriers, partner hotel stays, magazine subscriptions or donations to charity.
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