Do 30 to 60 minutes of a moderate-intensity aerobic activity three or four days per week. Moderate-intensity activities include cycling, jogging, swimming and hitting a punching bag. This will help improve your cardiovascular system, which means more oxygen will be used throughout your body during your big fight. Your heart and lungs will work more efficiently and you will be less tired while you are fighting.

Fuel your body right. MMA fighter Jon Manley recommends eating five clean meals per day, consisting of lean proteins, a variety of fruits and vegetables and unprocessed carbohydrates. Shop the outer rim of the grocery store to avoid the urge to purchase processed junk food that lurks on the inner-aisle shelves. Drink at least a gallon of water a day and drop your calories gradually if you need to lose weight. 

Determine the striking style you want to learn. If you want to be a well-rounded fighter, you'll want to develop solid punching and kicking skills. The most common stand up disciplines in MMA are Muay Thai kickboxing, boxing, Tae Kwon Do, and Karate. Watch fighters that practice the fighting disciplines that you're interested in to help you decide on what styles you want to pursue.[1]
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.
Wedge one end of a barbell into the corner of a room (the edge of a bench can also be used). You may want to wrap the end of the bar in a towel to prevent slipping or damage to the walls. Place a light weight-plate on the other end of the bar, and grab the bar with your right hand near the edge. Get into a fighting stance, left foot forward (or right foot, if you’re a southpaw) and knees bent. Now bend both your knees and transfer your weight onto your back leg, as if you were crouching down before a jump [1].
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

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