When the UFC was created by Art Davie and Gracie, their intention was to pit fighters from different styles against each other in order to determine the best styles of fighting. It was also designed as a showcase for Gracie's family style of Brazilian jiu jitsu, which Gracie's brother, Royce, used to devastating effect as he submitted all his opponents to win the first UFC. Grappling became one of the key components of MMA training and modern fighters cross-train in striking, wrestling and grappling.
^ UFC 40: Vendetta (PPV)|format= requires |url= (help) (Television production). Zuffa (November 22, 2002). Event occurs at 1:00 into Chuck Liddell vs. Renato Sobral. "The evolution of martial arts since 1993, since the UFC came around, martial arts have evolved more than they have in the last 700 years. We know exactly now what works in a real live situation with two warriors fighting. For a long time that was just speculation." —Joe Rogan
The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 
This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.
“To me the Warriors Cove is much more than a martial arts school.  I came to the Warriors Cove 4 years ago.  I was very out of shape and weak.  I struggled at first against bigger and stronger opponents.  But I fell in love with the game, and stuck with it.  MMA, for me is the only physical activity that has ever been able to hold my interest.  I know if it wasn’t for finding the Warriors Cove, I would still be weak and out of shape.”
OK so for the Intermediate Level, we’re adding time and volume. Can you cut the mustard? We’re keeping the exercises the same but the rounds are now the full UFC length, which is 5 minutes and I want to challenge you to add volume too. That means we’re taking the Burpees and Swings up to 15 reps and the Jumping Jacks go to 30. The Turkish Get Up round should have you adding 1 or 2 reps as well.
Conor McGregor fits the mold of the flashy fighter. While some of his counterparts attend media events wearing an understated t-shirt and baseball cap, McGregor is most comfortable delivering post-fight invectives in a designer suit. He sits at indoor press conferences behind a veneer of cockiness and thick sunglasses, bolstered by a professional MMA record of 19-2.
This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:

In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
MMA is a fighting style that requires more than one person to properly train. However, certain warm-ups and practices can be done alone to increase speed and accuracy of technique for fundamental movements, such as shadow boxing, using dummies or punching bags for grappling movements and striking, and practicing footwork. Another core element of MMA is cardio, so that you don't get tired out in the ring.
The second, 5-minute round is similar in function to the first, but focused solely on kneeing and kicking movements instead of boxing. "I kick low, high, and mid-range, and often double-up my kicks—meaning I throw a left kick, left kick, one after the other as fast as possible," Camozzi says. "I also mix up high and low. I might throw a low left kick immediately followed by a high right kick." The point is to keep the pace fast and high-volume for the entire 5-minute round, but you're welcome to get creative as you go.
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.
This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4
Training for a sport isn’t the same as logging a sweat session at the gym. “If you’re boxing, it’s not about burning calories or fat—it’s about getting good at the movements and building a skill,” says Ortiz. “It brings you back to when you were a kid, when you wanted to be a baseball player or a ballerina.” With that in mind, add some or all of these exercises to your next workout routine for an added punch. Complete 8-10 reps of each.

Categories: 2017 American television series debuts2010s American drama television series2010s American legal television seriesAmerican LGBT-related television showsAmerican television spin-offsLesbian-related television programsSerial drama television seriesTelevision series by CBS Television StudiosTelevision series by Scott Free ProductionsTelevision shows set in ChicagoCBS All Access original programming

Clinch-Fighting is a tactic consisting of using a clinch hold to prevent the opponent from moving away into more distant striking range, while also attempting takedowns and striking the opponent using knees, stomps, elbows, and punches. The clinch is often utilized by wrestlers and Judokas that have added components of the striking game (typically boxing), and Muay Thai fighters.


Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one.
The CABMMA first hit international sports headlines when it suspended fighter Rousimar Palhares for prolonging a submission on opponent Mike Pierce, despite him tapping several times, during UFC Fight Night 29 in Barueri, Brazil on 9th Oct 2013.[203][204] The CABMMA was called to preside over another controversial situation involving a Brazilian competitor, when Vitor Belfort's use of Testosterone Replacement Therapy came to light over UFC on FX 8 (May 18, 2013)[205]

Happy Monday! Episode 74 here to make it a little better for you. Phoenix is joined by Prince "Trooper" Brathwaite. Prince is in the Daily Burn network and owner of Trooper Fitness. He is big on mental strength just as much as he is in physical. He'll share his trooper mentality, thoughts on how to make HIIT better, and answer some questions from the Daily Burn community. All in all, sit back, relax, and just soak in the knowledge Phoenix and Prince share on episode 74.

May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.


Submission-Seeking is a reference to the strategy of taking an opponent to the ground using a takedown or throw and then applying a submission hold, forcing the opponent to submit. While grapplers will often work to attain dominant position, some may be more comfortable fighting from other positions. If a grappler finds themselves unable to force a takedown, they may resort to pulling guard, whereby they physically pull their opponent into a dominant position on the ground.[137]
Fit to Fight®’s From The Ground Up™ is a groundfighting program designed to tackle the omnipresent self-protection dilemma of ending up on the ground during an altercation. It prioritizes the tools realistically required to get up from the ground during an affray when your attacker seeks to hold you there. From The Ground Up™ is a three-tiered program that bridges the gap between being told it is imperative “to get back up” and how to actually accomplish that in real time.

Do you want to join the ranks of Randy Couture, Quinton "Rampage" Jackson, and Anderson Silva in becoming an Ultimate Fighter? With the proper guidance and background, you can learn to become the kind of well-rounded athletic competitor that the UFC is looking for. Learn to fight, get experience, and figure out how to go pro. See Step 1 for more information.
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Canada formally decriminalized mixed martial arts with a vote on Bill S-209 on June 5, 2013. The bill formally gives provinces the power to create athletic commissions to regulate and sanction professional mixed martial arts bouts.[56] Bill S-209 does not in and of itself make MMA legal across Canada; it allows provinces to make it legal on a province by province basis.[210]
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.
The ALACTIC system (aka the phosphagen or phosphocreatine system) is the energy system capable of producing the most energy within the shortest amount of time. A fight-ending flurry or combination uses this energy system. The alactic system is different to the aerobic and anaerobic system in that it produces energy by directly breaking down the ATP molecule, bypassing the conversion of fats, carbohydrates or protein into ATP. However, our body has limited stores of ATP, therefore the alactic system is the quickest to fatigue and can only produce large bursts of energy for up to 10 seconds. Fully restoring phosphocreatine and ATP stores takes around 5-8 minutes; this restoration time can be influenced by strength & conditioning training, as well as the level of development of the aerobic and anaerobic system.
“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.
Zone 4 is called threshold training. As the name implies, this training zone occurs near an athlete's lactate threshold (95-105% of lactate threshold). This intensity cannot be held for long, as hydrogen ions begin to accumulate. For this reason, training in this zone will improve an athlete's tolerance to pain/the burning sensation and will directly increase their ability to produce force and energy during muscle and mental fatigue.

Offering men�s programs, women�s programs and youth programs, from kickboxing and self-defense to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, our selection will fit the needs of beginners to advanced students. Elite MMA schools includes four facilities conveniently located around the greater Houston area and offer weekday, night and weekend classes taught by certified and caring instructors. We offer a complimentary private lesson to potential members and tours of our facilities, come see why Elite MMA is the right school for you.
For many years, professional MMA competitions were illegal in Canada. Section 83(2) of the Canadian Criminal Code deemed that only boxing matches where only fists are used are considered legal.[208][209] However most provinces regulated it by a provincial athletic commission (skirting S. 83(2) by classifying MMA as "mixed boxing"),[210] such as the provinces of Manitoba, Ontario,[211] Nova Scotia, Quebec, and Northwest Territories. The legality of MMA in the provinces of Alberta, British Columbia, and New Brunswick varies depending on the municipality.[212][213] Professional MMA competitions remain illegal in the Canadian provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, Prince Edward Island, Saskatchewan, Yukon, and Nunavut because it is not regulated by an athletic commission.
Hi my name is Anthony, or better known around these parts as The MMA Guru. I started training Muay Thai in 2013 and fell in love with many other forms of Martial Arts ever since, so much so that I decided to create this website to share my love of the martial arts. This site is a go-to resource for MMA, Boxing, Muay Thai, and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu enthusiasts.
Note that this workout is very simple. For example, you might ask, “Only three sets of pressing for the first workout?” Yes. Do not do more than mentioned. Sometimes volume is low to allow you to adjust to the new program or to allow for strategic deconditioning. Also, combat athletes are among the most prone to overtraining, especially if they are training in their skilled disciplines three or more times per week. Given that scenario, this workout will be perfectly adequate for results.
While most fighters use ground-and-pound statically, by way of holding their opponents down and mauling them with short strikes from the top position, a few fighters manage to utilize it dynamically by striking their opponents while changing positions, thus not allowing their opponents to settle once they take them down. Cain Velasquez is one of the most devastating ground strikers in MMA and is known for continuing to strike his opponents on the ground while transitioning between positions.[127] Fedor Emelianenko, considered among the greatest masters of ground-and-pound in MMA history, was the first to demonstrate this dynamic style of striking in transition. He was striking his opponents on the ground while passing guard, or while his opponents were attempting to recover guard.[128][129]
How to: Start off on all fours. Lift your knees off the floor and raise your hips slightly, bracing your core as you do so. That’s the “bear” position! Keeping your shoulders and hips at the same height, step forward with your right foot while reaching forward with your right hand. Repeat on the left side and continue moving forward, building speed as you go. Roaring is optional.
The only way to stop your opponent in a fight is to inflict enough damage so he is incapable of further aggression. This means you have to know what anatomical targets are available for you to attack in a fight. This is actually important form both offensive and defensive reasons. Essentially, this means you have to assailant's anatomical targets are located in one of three possible target zones.
Francis used to have his sprinters – some of the most explosive and powerful athletes in the world – perform what he called “tempo runs” on lower intensity training days. These tempo runs generally consisted of short sprints of 12-15 seconds at 75% or less of their maximum speed with about 1 minute or so of rest between sprints.  Even though the short sprint events Francis coached were extremely explosive and anaerobic in nature, he believed these lower intensity aerobic intervals played a key role in building work capacity and improving speed.

In many of my self-defense dvds, I have defined a street fight as a spontaneous and violent confrontation between two or more individuals where no rules will apply. A real street fight is not about the boxing ring, rules and regulations or any combat sports competition. It's about protecting yourself and your loved ones from serious bodily injury and possibly death.


The workout consists of a warmup, a circuit workout, and an additional set of grip-strength moves. The circuit workout comprises five stations, each with its own set of exercises designed to be done back-to-back. Do as many reps as possible at each station in five minutes, rest 60 seconds, then move on to the next station. You'll do that station workout three times, for a total of 15 stations.
Another common myth is that lactate doesn't form until you perform high-intensity exercises. Lactate actually forms even during lower intensity exercise (because the anaerobic system is still active to a degree). The amount of lactate produced is very minimal; we are able to shuttle this lactate into our mitochondria via the Cori-Cycle and effectively reuse it as energy. During the later round of a intense brawl however, the rate of lactate clearance simply cannot match the rate of which it is produced, this is called the lactate threshold. The figure below shows how lactate is recycled as energy after being produced as a by-product of fast glycoglysis (anaerobic metabolism).

In February 2016, Michelle and Robert King, when asked about a spin-off, stated that there was a possibility for a spin-off series.[23] In May 2016, CBS was in final negotiations to set up a spin-off featuring Christine Baranski reprising her role as Diane Lockhart, but which would air on CBS All Access instead of the network.[4] The spin-off was officially ordered to series on May 18, with Cush Jumbo returning as well.[7] In September 2016, it was confirmed that the 10 episode spin-off would premiere in February 2017, with the story picking up a year after the final episode of the original series and seeing Diane pushed out of her firm after a financial scam involving her mentee wipes out her savings, resulting in her move to Lucca Quinn's firm.[2] The series was initially planned to air in May 2017, but was moved to February 2017 after production delays forced CBS to postpone the premiere of the new series, Star Trek: Discovery.[3] After months of speculation, CBS revealed the title for the spin-off series, which was revealed to be The Good Fight, on October 31, 2016.[24] It was announced that The Good Fight would premiere on February 19, 2017.[1] CBS released the first trailer for the spinoff on December 18, 2016, featuring footage from the premiere and later episodes.[25]
Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Is it for you? If you crave contact, this is for you. There’s a lot of twisting and striking, so it’s great for your core and requires strong joints. But, all of that contact means you’ll be leaving classes with bruises. And when you get to the higher levels, the tests get to be fights. But, on the list, it’s the most practical and involves very little ground game if that’s not your thing. Just don’t expect to find any Krav Maga tournaments to participate in.

The first documented use of the name mixed martial arts was in a review of UFC 1 by television critic Howard Rosenberg, in 1993.[1] The term gained popularity when the website newfullcontact.com, then one of the biggest covering the sport, hosted and reprinted the article. The first use of the term by a promotion was in September 1995 by Rick Blume, president and CEO of Battlecade Extreme Fighting, just after UFC 7.[47] UFC official Jeff Blatnick was responsible for the Ultimate Fighting Championship officially adopting the name mixed martial arts. It was previously marketed as "Ultimate Fighting" and "No Holds Barred (NHB)", until Blatnick and John McCarthy proposed the name "MMA" at the UFC 17 rules meeting in response to increased public criticism.[48] The question as to who actually coined the name is still in debate.[3]
The Los Angeles Times suggested that Good Fight creators Robert and Michelle King "still had the Good Wife magic" and though Good Wife "had already [run] its course" after seasons 6 and 7 had received mediocre reviews, "they just needed a clean slate" to allow them to continue to mine more stories from that fictional universe.[40] In addition, unlike Good Wife which was centered around "romantic tension" and got bogged down in Alicia Florrick's (Julianne Margulies) love life, Good Fight was considered "refreshing for steering the story the other way" as relationships are "not the plot points that drive the story".[41] Good Fight is regarded as a rare successful example of a TV series spin-off, as other contemporary TV series are either reboots or remakes.[42]
The Good Fight is an American legal and political drama web television series produced for CBS's streaming service CBS All Access. It is CBS All Access's first original scripted series.[1] The series—created by Robert King, Michelle King, and Phil Alden Robinson—is a spin-off and sequel to The Good Wife, which was created by the Kings. The first season contains 10 episodes,[2] and premiered on February 19, 2017, with the first episode airing on CBS and the following nine episodes on CBS All Access.[1] The series was initially planned to air in May 2017, but was moved up after production delays forced CBS to postpone the premiere of the new series Star Trek: Discovery.[3]
“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”
I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
Hi, thankyou for writing this blog and gave me a insight on the mma theory as I’ve been studying and training in mma for six months after returning 14 years away and experienced domestic violence from my former husband and couldn’t take the pain let alone allow my demons to control me no more also wished my children to have a better future as they too train with me in taekwondo, Hapkido but I also do cage and muay Thai kickboxing as well. I begun with boxing and weight training in the gym last February and rejoined the mma world where I’ve found myself again but I’m facing one obstacle and I’m too hard on myself when I train. I tend to punish myself if I don’t get a certain technique perfected and I punish myself through more training Til I get it right. My teammates are terrific when they encourage and assure me but I still punish myself as I want it to get all perfected even just once. I know this presents ego behaviour but I want to make myself, my children, my friends, family, teammates, teachers even those I idolise to be proud of me. It has given me great confidence to be stronger and disciplined as well helped with my anger issues. ,
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."
There has been a growing awareness of women in mixed martial arts due to popular female fighters and personalities such as Megumi Fujii, Miesha Tate, Cristiane "Cyborg" Santos, Ronda Rousey, Joanna Jędrzejczyk, Holly Holm and Gina Carano among others. Carano became known as "the face of women's MMA" after appearing in a number of EliteXC events. This was furthered by her appearances on MGM Television's 2008 revival of their game show American Gladiators.[citation needed] 
×