Jose Octavio Rivas, Jr. – Rivas is a high school teacher in the Lennox School District of California, teaching STEM classes to a primarily minority student population with a high poverty rate. In his efforts, Rivas has secured over $150,000 in funding, and is focused on helping his students succeed by preparing to become engineers. Rivas was a runner-up for our 2016 Escalante-Gradillas Prize for Best in Education.
I wasn't sure what to give this one but it was well done so I'll settle for a 4... I've done martial arts for years but never got into mma and figured I would take a look. I saw that it had strikes and takedowns, grappling positions, and so on... all presented for the beginner(?). So far, so good. Then I saw the footwork section which made me cringe a little. When presenting forward movement (for example), he leans way back while sticking the lead leg out and finally drops forward. While stepping back he leans far forward. Later there's a quick note on "advanced shuffles" in which its said things are done more fluidly, but no picture there. I'm sure the way the steps were done was just for slow illustrative purposes (?) but they look like someone was testing unsafe ice, not moving in a fight. Anyway, things go good again after that. Too many combinations for me (anyone can link together some 1-2s, etc.) but this is for beginners (I think). After some more good stuff with very good clear pictures and explanations... another complaint: knives. I flipped back to the author's style after the footwork examples and multiple pages of knife fighting in an mma book to see that his style seems to primarily be jeetkunedo. I figured it was an mma book by an mma guy, not a mma book by a jkd guy. Not that this makes it bad but still... Anyway, theres a knife section, in the clinch chapter there is knife fighting from the clinch, in the ground fighting section there is more knife fighting. for a fairly thin (but fairly comprehensive) book on mma I'd rather there not be so many pages on knives and combos. Now after all that you might think I hated the book or something but no. for someone (almost like me) who knows little of mma or martial arts in general and wants to learn, its a good book. For someone with any knowledge on mma or who has done martial arts for years, there is less to gain. Even with no mma background, there wasn't much that I hadn't seen or done before (ready guard, jabs, hooks, elbows, double leg takedown, etc...) I would market it as a book for beginners or maybe call it mma self defense and then half my complaints would disappear (I guess it does say mma techniques, it doesn't say it is purely mma but I'd make it more clear). as for the video, that's not very clear but in my opinion the video was just an extra freebee that came with the book so I don't care about production quality. i'd throw in one final complaint about the defense against the oblique kick but this has gone on long enough. basically, complaints aside, there are good explanations, great tips, very clear pictures, he covered a lot of ground and made a good book. I also like the parts where he shows self defense options (where you can use dirty tricks to defend yourself with moves that aren't allowed in mma). my personal complaint is that I learned little but maybe that won't be true for you.
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Training and strengthening the core especially correlates to the cage when he’s on the ground, according to Jackson. “In Brazilian jujitsu, if somebody is laying on top of you and you got to get up, your core gets tired,” he admitted. “If I haven’t been working on my core, it’s harder to get up off your back because your core fatigues. You get tired and it takes a lot of core to do certain moves and get out of moves. That’s why a strong core is important.” Plus, Jackson says, “I think I read in Men’s Health that if you have [strong] abs, you live longer and stuff.” (He’s right! We did say that.)
I currently do 4 days of MMA training, Mon, Tues, Thurs, Fri. Im looking for a well balanced gym routine. We do strength training in my gym which we do with bodyweight (pushups, situps, squats, etc) in 2 - 3 min rounds. i tried going to the gym but may have pushed to hard and was out of training for a day. this looks like doable with my schedule, but i want to target more muscle groups.

The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.


Before moving forward, it's important to distinguish the difference between both conventional and extreme street fighting. So what is the different between the two? To answer this question all you need to do is look to the weapons in a military's arsenal which includes both conventional and nuclear weapons. The same applies to personal combat, you too must have an arsenal of both conventional and extreme or nuclear weapons at your disposal.
Julius Lester – Lester is a man of many talents. As an academic, he taught at the University of Massachusetts Amherst in African-American Studies, English, Literature, and Judaic Studies for 32 years. Lester has also authored 44 books, 31 of which are children's books that focus on black protagonists and black life in America. He is also a widely published essayist, folk musician, and photographer.
If you don't have access to a heavy bag, or you need a workout you can do from a hotel room or small space, don't worry, there's a solution. In fact, according to Matt Marsden, a fitness instructor at Beacon College in Leesburg, Florida, who has a training and coaching background in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Judo, boxing, Muay Thai, and Tae Kwon Do, this type of workout is pretty common for MMA fighters because they travel so frequently and sometimes have to train outside of the typical gym setting.

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This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4
Using a completely scientific approach to weight training progression, a cycle will be designed to meet your needs. For example, a Hypertrophy phase will increase cross sectional area of the muscle. A Maximum Strength phase will increase recruitment and strength of the muscle. The Power Transfer phase will help those who wish to increase the pure speed of their actions and the Competition phase to increase your strength, power, size, and speed throughout your “in-season”.

The thing is, to stand your ground. Back the fucker off. Make them understand, that they WILL get hurt. Most people who thing that they are bad asses are fucking wimps. I don’t care HOW much muscle a guy has. If you have a walking stick, don’t lash out wildly. Target your strikes. There is a technique in the Philippine stick fighting system called Circular strikes. It allows you to deliver a much harder blow – enough to break bone.
But just because it's a straightforward workout, that doesn't mean you should take it lightly. Camozzi stresses that you should push yourself, working at a quick pace with fast punches and lots of footwork. "You will feel it in your legs after the shadowboxing, and that's what we want," he says. "Picture yourself in the ring fighting. No dropping your hands or walking around and throwing a combo here and there."
Another common misconception is that boxing is primarily an arm workout. Sure, you’ll shred your tris and bis, but Ortiz says you’ll actually be targeting more of your core and legs. “You’re working your obliques because you’re crunching to the sides and twisting,” he says. “And you’re constantly bending from the hips and bouncing on your toes, which uses your quads, hamstrings, and calves.”
The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.
If a fighter has been doing two workouts per day for a month straight, has poor nutrition, doesn’t sleep much, and is stressed out, the last thing he needs is a ball-busting, crusher workout that is just going to break him down even more. Remember, these guys are punching each other in the face, taking each other down, and tying each other into knots. They are always banged up somewhere.
Funk Roberts is President and Owner of Funk Roberts Fitness and FunkMMA.com. He is a former Professional Beach Volleyball player turned Certified Personal and Metabolic Trainer, MMA Conditioning Coach (MMACA), Online Fat Loss Expert and Amazon #1 Best Selling Author for ‘Rapid Body Makeover” and has appeared as a Fitness Expert on ABC, NBC, CBS and FOX affiliates. With over 20 years experience he has helped thousands of fitness enthusiast, combat fighters, trainers and coaches reach their fitness goals and improve athletic performance through his programs. Each week Funk reaches over 350,000 combat athletes worldwide through his newsletter, social media and online programs and has helped fighters prepare for battle in most of the major MMA and Combat promotions including UFC, Bellator, Glory, K1, ADCC and Grapplers Quest, making him one of the strength and conditioning leaders in the combat sport community. Funk also helps 100,000 plus fitness enthusiast burn fat while building lean muscle using his metabolic workouts and healthy nutrition You can connect with Funk through his http://www.funkmma.com blog which has over 200 workout videos, nutrition tips and training advice all targeted to MMA, martial arts and combat athletes around the world He continues to learn and improve his skills so that he can supply the best information and contribute to the fitness community and help people make a difference in their lives. Funk is 46 years old, currently lives Toronto Canada and is married with 2 older boys (18,25). His passion is training athletes, helping people transform their lives, travelling and spending time with his wife and family.
Speed rope training and shadow boxing are staples of a fighter’s workout. They burn an insane amount of calories, tone your entire body, and have you gasping for air in minutes. With minimal equipment needed, they can be done almost anywhere. Incorporate these two classic exercises into your weekly workouts to change up stale routines, and maybe, just maybe, you’ll be able to last a few rounds with one of the greats.
The term no holds barred was used originally to describe the wrestling method prevalent in catch wrestling tournaments during the late 19th century wherein no wrestling holds were banned from the competition, regardless of how dangerous they might be. The term was applied to mixed martial arts matches, especially at the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship.[106]
No-holds-barred fighting reportedly took place in the late 1880s when wrestlers representing style of Catch wrestling and many others met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe. In the USA, the first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight world boxing champion, entered the ring with his trainer, wrestling champion William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. In September 1901, Frank "Paddy" Slavin, who had been a contender for Sullivan's boxing title, knocked out future world wrestling champion Frank Gotch in Dawson City, Canada.[17] The judo-practitioner Ren-nierand, who gained fame after defeating George Dubois, would fight again in another similar contest, which he lost to Ukrainian Catch wrestler Ivan Poddubny.[16]
While we may be known for training professional athletes and our Neurological Reengineering programs, BARWIS truly is a place for everyone to enjoy. Check out the list of core services we offer for the general public and please feel free to contact us with any questions you may have. Drop by the center anytime during business hours for a workout and who knows... you might even catch a glimpse of what a professional athlete's workout is like while working up a sweat!
While mixed martial arts was initially practiced almost exclusively by competitive fighters, this is no longer the case. As the sport has become more mainstream and more widely taught, it has become accessible to wider range of practitioners of all ages. Proponents of this sort of training argue that it is safe for anyone, of any age, with varying levels of competitiveness and fitness.[95][96]
Starting in the boxing stance, squat slightly and twist your body to the left while pivoting your right foot. As you turn, bring your right arm and fist up, toward your target. Then pull your elbow back and reassume the boxing stance. Next, throw a left uppercut: Keeping your knees slightly bent, pivot to the left with your right foot while twisting your body to the left. Then, keeping your weight forward, twist back to the right toward your target while bringing your left arm and fist up. Repeat the movements, alternating between them, for 30 seconds.
The workout consists of a warmup, a circuit workout, and an additional set of grip-strength moves. The circuit workout comprises five stations, each with its own set of exercises designed to be done back-to-back. Do as many reps as possible at each station in five minutes, rest 60 seconds, then move on to the next station. You'll do that station workout three times, for a total of 15 stations.
MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”
Note that this workout is very simple. For example, you might ask, “Only three sets of pressing for the first workout?” Yes. Do not do more than mentioned. Sometimes volume is low to allow you to adjust to the new program or to allow for strategic deconditioning. Also, combat athletes are among the most prone to overtraining, especially if they are training in their skilled disciplines three or more times per week. Given that scenario, this workout will be perfectly adequate for results.
The HawaiianMiles rewards program is ideal for those traveling from the United States, Asia and the South Pacific to the Hawaiian Islands. Hawaiian Airlines serves more than 25 domestic and international destinations and provides nonstop daily service to Hawaii from multiple U.S. cities. The HawaiianMiles program offers a variety of ways to earn miles, from booking flights and hotels to shopping at Hawaiian Airlines partner vendors. Earn more miles on everyday purchases by signing up and using the Hawaiian Airlines World Elite Mastercard from Barclays. You can redeem your miles for future hotel stays, car rentals and flights on Hawaiian Airlines and its airline partners, which include JetBlue and Korean Air. 

MMA is legal in Bahrain. Bahrain National MMA Federation (BNMMAF) has been set up under the patronage of Sheikh Khalid bin Hamad Al Khalifa and the jurisdiction of the Sports Minister Sheikh Nasser bin Hamad Al Khalifa.[193] The development of MMA in the nation is convened through KHK MMA, which also owns Brave Combat Federation, which is the largest Mixed Martial Arts promotion in the Middle East.[194] Bahrain will be hosting World MMA Amateurs Championship 2017 supported by International Mixed Martial Arts Federation.[195]
May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.
Originally promoted as a competition to find the most effective martial arts for real unarmed combat, competitors from different fighting styles were pitted against one another in contests with relatively few rules.[8] Later, individual fighters incorporated multiple martial arts into their style. MMA promoters were pressured to adopt additional rules to increase competitors' safety, to comply with sport regulations and to broaden mainstream acceptance of the sport.[9] Following these changes, the sport has seen increased popularity with a pay-per-view business that rivals boxing and professional wrestling.[10]
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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One day three thugs surrounded me trying to take my hard-earned money out of my pockets. I snapped. Within in a few seconds I round house kicked them in the balls. You should have seen the look in their eyes! It was a great feeling. Guess what? They never picked on me again. In fact, I gained a lot of respect from them and they wanted to be my friends.
I trained couple of months with BJJ as a noob last year. Five minutes of grappling does a lot of cardio. Way better than repeatedly running in treadmills. I recommend anyone who works out and lift weights to take interest in MMA. It’s not complete but it’s the closest thing that can *possibly* save you in street fight. Street fights are usually quick, dirty, and intense. You are either in Fight, Flight, or Freeze mode. Your body has to know and react fast enough. Whatever happens do NOT ever end up in freeze mode. When your brain shuts off. Like your body can do a lot of things you thought it was impossible when it is loaded with adrenaline and the feeling of “rush”. Like that teenage guy who lifted a car off to rescue his uncle. I think that was on the news last time.
The mid-19th century saw the prominence of the new sport savate in the combat sports circle. French savate fighters wanted to test their techniques against the traditional combat styles of its time. In 1852, a contest was held in France between French savateurs and English bare-knuckle boxers in which French fighter Rambaud alias la Resistance fought English fighter Dickinson and won using his kicks. However, the English team still won the four other match-ups during the contest.[16] Contests occurred in the late 19th to mid-20th century between French Savateurs and other combat styles. Examples include a 1905 fight between French savateur George Dubois and a judo practitioner Re-nierand which resulted in the latter winning by submission, as well as the highly publicized 1957 fight between French savateur and professional boxer Jacques Cayron and a young Japanese karateka named Mochizuki Hiroo which ended when Cayron knocked Hiroo out with a hook.[16]
The significance of strong investigative journalism and reporting cannot be overlooked. In a time when there is a prevailing sense of skepticism concerning the news media that can be seen on both sides of the political aisle, when the lines between real news and fake news are becoming more and more blurred, and where partisan politics in reporting is standard fare, the need for serious, objective, and critical journalism has rarely been more pertinent.

From The Ground Up™ uses the best of wrestling and Brazilian jiu-jitsu, with an emphasis on the “goals” for groundfighting, as opposed to the goals for protracted grappling. Essentially, From The Ground Up™ is the absent modality for self-defense practitioners that do not want a sport based grappling program, while recognizing “the need to get wet, in order to not drown.”

Don't be too hard on yourself and stay positive. If you don't have experience with martial arts, it's possible that you'll be sparring against someone more experienced. Don't expect to be amazing at fighting if you've had no training. It will most likely take you a lot of hours and work training before you can compete in your gym. It's important to keep this in mind so that you don't get discouraged.


The Combat Fitness classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a cardio blitz designed to give people of all fitness levels a great workout. This class utilizes components of kickboxing, boxing & MMA skills and dynamic conditioning drills using combat principles. This class is perfect for beginners or those looking to shake out the ring rust and get back into fighting shape.
Before I show you any actual fighting techniques, you need a posture or stance that will maximize your offensive techniques and provide defensive protection. In my Contemporary Fighting Arts, I teach my students a broad scope of strategic stances that protect your center line during a street fight. But for purposes of this how to article, I will only address the fighting stance. But, in order to better appreciate the fighting stance you should have a basic understanding of the center line theory. Basically, the center line is an imaginary vertical line that divides your body in half. Located on this line are some of your most vital anatomical targets that you must protect in a street fight. These targets include the eyes, nose, chin, throat, solar plexus and groin. Your center line is best protected by using a fighting stance that strategically position your targets away from direct hits.
The workout lasts approximately as long as a real championship MMA fight: five rounds. In those rounds, you’ll perform a little of nearly every kind of exercise that fighters use to prepare for battle, from jumping rope to body-weight circuits to combinations on the heavy bag. Use it to get in fighting shape, and then watch the real fights from the safest of your couch. But if you want to work out like a real warrior, try stealing the routine that Genghis Khan had his armies do.

According to ScorecardMMA.com, one of the world’s top statistical rankings services for MMA,[64] and the only one currently ranking MMA promotions worldwide statistically; "To rank MMA Promotions we use an index that we calculate weekly- Promotion Score.Promo Score calculation is based on the strength of Events and Fighters that Promotion has at that time. Promo Score has three main components:


I can say with confidence that 99 percent of us don't have the same schedule as a professional athlete. Instead of a 10 a.m. marketing meeting, professional fighters start their morning with the first of two daily training sessions. Their afternoon may consist of interviews, an appointment with the physical therapist, lunch, a nap, and then they're back in the gym for their second training session.
As a veteran fighter, the 6-1, 265-pound Jackson has a painful admission to make. “I suck at jumping rope for some reason,” he claimed. Perhaps it’s the volume that challenges him, as his coach will have him doing anywhere from three five-minute rounds to 10 five-minute rounds, “depending on how pissed he is at me.” To put the latter into perspective, a Bellator title match lasts for five five-minute rounds (normal matches are three rounds), so 10 five-minute rounds of jumping rope is double the time of a fight. Obviously, jumping rope helps fighters with their conditioning, but Jackson credits the age-old training method for improving his agility and footwork as well.
If the only boxing you’ve done involved a crate of oranges, you may want to look for a takedown in a fight-wrestling an opponent off his feet and onto the floor so he can’t hit you. “Some guys can get to the legs, but they lack the power to pick an opponent up off his feet to finish the takedown,” says Zach Even-Esh, a strength coach to MMA athletes in Edison, NJ. “To improve speed and strength, try the barbell burpee power clean.”

In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
Kickboxing classes at Team Quest MMA in Portland are a mixture of several techniques employed in the rest of the forms of martial arts. Referred to as the “science of 8 limbs” simply because almost all parts of the body are employed during the fight. The forehead, the fists, elbows, knees, and feet are often used as the weapons. It has been around for more than 2000 years and is basically regarded as the oldest variant of martial arts.
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While most fighters use ground-and-pound statically, by way of holding their opponents down and mauling them with short strikes from the top position, a few fighters manage to utilize it dynamically by striking their opponents while changing positions, thus not allowing their opponents to settle once they take them down. Cain Velasquez is one of the most devastating ground strikers in MMA and is known for continuing to strike his opponents on the ground while transitioning between positions.[127] Fedor Emelianenko, considered among the greatest masters of ground-and-pound in MMA history, was the first to demonstrate this dynamic style of striking in transition. He was striking his opponents on the ground while passing guard, or while his opponents were attempting to recover guard.[128][129]
Visualize your results while you are working out, and know that they will be accomplished. Visualize each workout before you do it, while you are doing it, and how you did it. Get specific on your visualization during your workouts. Visualize yourself getting stronger with every rep. Visualize and feel your cardio increasing every time you are working out. Vsualize your technique and your power increasing with every punch, kick, pull-up, push-up, etc. Visualize the results you want to get, while you are training.

Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.


So many great articles Joel full of information that I would probably not have been able to decipher for several yeas. Cheers for making my work easier. I am a physiotherapist and have worked in professional soccer for several years in England and so much like you say that even at the elite level there is a lot of ineffective training methods been used I tend to agree just from my experience. Keep up the great work and when will the new book be out?
The materials and information provided in this presentation, document and/or any other communication (“Communication”) from Onnit Labs, Inc. or any related entity or person (collectively “Onnit”) are strictly for informational purposes only and are not intended for use as diagnosis, prevention or treatment of a health problem or as a substitute for consulting a qualified medical professional. Some of the concepts presented herein may be theoretical.
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

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