At Elite MMA, we pride ourselves on offering a comprehensive variety of mixed martial arts classes and work with each student to find the program(s) that fit their needs. Not everyone is looking for the same outcome from joining Elite MMA so our classes allow you to choose the subject that interests you the most, to try something new, or try them all. At Elite MMA, the instructors and staff will work with your unique goals in mind to find the right fit for your needs.
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.
What is it? The literal Hebrew translation of Krav Maga is “battle contact” and we can’t think of a better description. It was developed by the Israeli Defense Force to be used in real-life combat situations. In addition to punches, kicks and throws, it teaches real-life scenarios like how to disarm an attacker. Rubber knives and guns will make appearances.
Hey I’m a 19 year old training to become an mma fighter. I dropped out of college to pursue this passion. I still have a job but only work Fri Sat Sun and have the rest of the week to train. I currently do 2 days of strength and conditioning/jiu jitsu, 2 days of jiu jitsu/muay thai and 1 day of just strength and conditioning. So I basically do 2-a-days 4 days a week, but I’m limited to 1 workout Friday because of work. Does this sound like a decent schedule? My coach said I could incorporate sprint training during the dead space between jiu jitsu and muay thai on the days I’m doing those. Would that maybe be too much on top of the stuff I’m already doing? He said because I’m young it’s hard for me to overtrain.
During an actual fight, you will be under a tremendous amount of stress. This often causes many people to tense up and actually hold their breath as they are fighting. Breathing is one of the most important and often neglected aspects of real street fighting training. Proper breathing promotes muscular relaxation and increases the speed and efficiency of your compound attack. The rate at which you breath will also determine how quickly your cardiorespiratory system can recover from a real street fight encounter. NOTE: Remember to always exhale when executing a striking tool or technique in a real street fighting situation.
Strength and conditioning sessions are supporting sessions to all other training. If because of your training the athlete is so sore for a couple of days that they have to miss their fighting practice, you did fail as a trainer. It may happen that you want to increase the intensity of your strength and conditioning sessions, but always make sure it does not conflict with the fighting practices.
Do a strength training workout three or four days a week. Weight training using free weights or specialized machines at the gym are good choices. Alternate between your upper and lower body each time you work out. You want to push yourself by lifting the heaviest possible weights, but you don't want to hurt yourself or become sore. Lessen the amount of weights or number of repetitions if you need to.
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!
Another common myth is that lactate doesn't form until you perform high-intensity exercises. Lactate actually forms even during lower intensity exercise (because the anaerobic system is still active to a degree). The amount of lactate produced is very minimal; we are able to shuttle this lactate into our mitochondria via the Cori-Cycle and effectively reuse it as energy. During the later round of a intense brawl however, the rate of lactate clearance simply cannot match the rate of which it is produced, this is called the lactate threshold. The figure below shows how lactate is recycled as energy after being produced as a by-product of fast glycoglysis (anaerobic metabolism).
Zone 3 is called tempo training or intensive endurance training. This zone challenges the upper limits of the aerobic system. Lactate production starts to ramp up at this Zone, however, there is no significant accumulation as intensity is still relatively low and clearance levels are still high due to the adequate of supply of oxygen to the muscles.
“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”
Shadow boxing is an essential practice for both MMA combatants and boxers. I make all the fighters I train shadow box at least 4 rounds as a warm up, with a mix of bag work, head movement drills and lastly focus mitts or pads and then back to shadowing a round or two as a cool down. I've noticed Shadow boxing in MMA for some it isn't used as much as it should be. I've even asked some of the fighters why they don't and most say they'd rather not waste their energy hitting nothing and would rather use that energy on the bag, mitts etc. but shadowing is an art and a major tool that should be used by every combatant. For whatever reason, the guys that don't I feel is the result of a lack of creative thinking.
When the UFC was created by Art Davie and Gracie, their intention was to pit fighters from different styles against each other in order to determine the best styles of fighting. It was also designed as a showcase for Gracie's family style of Brazilian jiu jitsu, which Gracie's brother, Royce, used to devastating effect as he submitted all his opponents to win the first UFC. Grappling became one of the key components of MMA training and modern fighters cross-train in striking, wrestling and grappling.
HBO has one more boxing card on its schedule -- a "World Championship Boxing" doubleheader on Oct. 27 from the Hulu Theater at Madison Square Garden in New York. It is headlined by the vacant middleweight world title fight between Daniel Jacobs and Sergey Derevyanchenko, with junior lightweight world titlist Alberto Machado defending his belt against Yuandale Evans in the co-feature.
Submissions are an essential part of many disciplines, most notably Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, catch wrestling, judo, Sambo, and shootwrestling. Submission-based styles were popularized in the early UFC events by Royce Gracie and Ken Shamrock, and were the dominant tactic in the early UFCs. Modern proponents of the submission-seeking style, such as Demian Maia and Ronaldo Souza, tend to come from a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu background.[138]
The course is a multi-level system that uses inert training weapons, such as SIRT training weapons from Next Level Training, to allow for training in a facility that is not established for live fire. The visual feedback and training weapon features allow for many elements of offensive firearms training to be covered while emphasizing the need for fighting, clinching, wrestling, and retention skills to go along with use of a firearm. 
Volume indicates how much total work is being put into endurance training. In sports like running, cycling and swimming, volume will be represented by the total distance travelled during training. In team sports and sports like MMA, training volume is measured by using the "time in zone" method. How much time per training day or training week are we spending in each training zone? This will give us an idea on how much rest an athlete needs, or whether we need to push them harder to achieve the level of conditioning we're seeking.
The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.
×