Naqam Washington has done it all, from being the traveling trainer for the New York Knicks, the fitness coach of Puff Combs, and is currently the trainer for Netflix Marvel series, Daredevil. His passion outside of training his star clients (which also includes Penny Hardaway, Patrick Ewing, and Gary Sheffield) are Muay thai, Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, and nerding out on comic books. 
Camron, thanks for the message. I would say that the number one priority would be skill development. Drilling, learning the technical aspects of striking and grappling. The S&C simply compliments the skill development, so 2-3 workouts per week is plenty. Stick to learning the basics of squatting, hinging, pushing, pulling and carrying heavy loads. Your success will come from lng term consistency, not short term intensity, so be patient, don’t overdo it and over time you will improve.

Include flexibility training to your regimen, but don’t try to be at contortionist. Include stretching into your training regimen, however don’t get hung up on being able to do the splits, put your foot behind your head, or bending yourself like a pretzel. Stretching is good to help prevent injuries, and keep your body more flexible. However don’t tear your muscles and tendons trying to become more flexible. Stretch lightly after your workouts when your body is warm. Don’t stretch before a workout, that is the way to pull or even rip a muscle. Doing most exercises to their full range of motion is a great way to stretch while you are working out. A lot of times you won’t need extra stretching after a workout, but if you feel tight after a workout, that is the best time to lightly stretch.
No-holds-barred fighting reportedly took place in the late 1880s when wrestlers representing style of Catch wrestling and many others met in tournaments and music-hall challenge matches throughout Europe. In the USA, the first major encounter between a boxer and a wrestler in modern times took place in 1887 when John L. Sullivan, then heavyweight world boxing champion, entered the ring with his trainer, wrestling champion William Muldoon, and was slammed to the mat in two minutes. The next publicized encounter occurred in the late 1890s when future heavyweight boxing champion Bob Fitzsimmons took on European wrestling champion Ernest Roeber. In September 1901, Frank "Paddy" Slavin, who had been a contender for Sullivan's boxing title, knocked out future world wrestling champion Frank Gotch in Dawson City, Canada.[17] The judo-practitioner Ren-nierand, who gained fame after defeating George Dubois, would fight again in another similar contest, which he lost to Ukrainian Catch wrestler Ivan Poddubny.[16]

If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
"I want to compete in the strawweight division, win this belt and I will do that, mark my words here and now. After that, I will move to the flyweight division. ... I beat Jessica [Andrade] so easily, only with my jab. There is nobody else who has beaten her [at strawweight]. For me, it’s 50-50 between her and Rose Namajunas. If Rose Namajunas is going to be smart and use her footwork and distance, she can win this fight. But of course, Jessica Andrade is like a bull in a fight. I cannot wait to face Rose or Andrade, but I would like to face Andrade one more time to show to people that there is only one person that can beat her, and it’s me.” h/t MMA Fighting • Listen to EuroBash (5:00 min mark)
I like keeping the strength training pretty simple. Exercise selection for strength phase includes deadlift, front and back squat, overhead squat, military (strict) press, bench press, different modification of rows, pull ups (weighted or bodyweight), and various core exercises. The basic principle is to include movements like pull, push, lift, squat, and twist/rotate.

Hi, thankyou for writing this blog and gave me a insight on the mma theory as I’ve been studying and training in mma for six months after returning 14 years away and experienced domestic violence from my former husband and couldn’t take the pain let alone allow my demons to control me no more also wished my children to have a better future as they too train with me in taekwondo, Hapkido but I also do cage and muay Thai kickboxing as well. I begun with boxing and weight training in the gym last February and rejoined the mma world where I’ve found myself again but I’m facing one obstacle and I’m too hard on myself when I train. I tend to punish myself if I don’t get a certain technique perfected and I punish myself through more training Til I get it right. My teammates are terrific when they encourage and assure me but I still punish myself as I want it to get all perfected even just once. I know this presents ego behaviour but I want to make myself, my children, my friends, family, teammates, teachers even those I idolise to be proud of me. It has given me great confidence to be stronger and disciplined as well helped with my anger issues. ,


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