What factors go into losing those last five pounds? Could it be the basic items such as sleep, mood levels, or getting the right app? Or is it the high level answers (like gluton, insulin, libido) that can really shave the last few pounds? We called a doctor to join us give us answers in episode 73 of In Fighting Shape. You don't want to miss Dr. Serena Goldstein break it down for you listeners, so tune in for episode 73 now!
This is a bit late but I would recommend training with weapons, not just fire arms but edge and impact (IE) knives and sticks. A good blade and a solid harden steel collapsible baton are hell of good equalizers in a fight. A High Lumans tactical flashlight with a harden impact head can stop multiple opponents with a less leather option, it even works in the day light. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZzN_6P-V7K4

Phoenix has her mentor, Lisa Wheeler in. Lisa was a modern dancer turned fitness professional.  Phoenix and Lisa talk about what it is like behind the scenes of the fitness workouts they film for Daily Burn's popular at home fitness videos. Lisa speaks of her goal to create great work and being good to people.  She shares what the business of fitness is really like, having been in the business for 25 years already.


For world-class fighting at its highest level, look no further than July’s five-rounder between strawweight champion Joanna Jedrzejczyk and Claudia Gadelha. An intense fight from start to finish, Jedrzejczyk proved her championship mettle in the toughest fight of her career, and Gadelha showed that she has the talent and determination to make another run at the crown.
Marsden also makes it clear that bodyweight conditioning workouts are every bit as important for MMA training as throwing punches in the ring. "If there's one thing for certain in this sport, it's that your heart rate will change several times over the course of a five-minute round due to the many battle styles a fight can take. It may start as a boxing match, move into Olympic-level wrestling, then return back to the feet," Marsden says. "To train in this manner, take the idea of rep schemes, ball it up and toss it in the trash. There are no reps anymore, just timed rounds."

Since “retirement” it seems GSP has been a busy guy, it’s been a few years since Rushfit came out and he’s back in the game with Touchfit. This is a mobile training app that’ll allow you to do your workouts anywhere, with video demonstrations right on your mobile device. The real beauty here lies in the data, Touchfit keeps track of everything, even your recovery time to make sure that you are avoiding injuries and not overtraining. There are over 500 different video exercises to keep things fresh, yet surprisingly there aren’t any lessons on point fighting or laying on top of your opponents. The app is free to download, and then $10 for a yearly subscription, or $2 for a week. You don’t have to be making GSP to get this MMA workout.
Most styles have been adapted from their traditional forms, such as boxing stances, which lack effective counters to leg kicks, the Muay Thai stance, which is poor for defending against takedowns due to its static nature, and Judo or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques, which must be adapted for No Gi competition. It is common for a fighter to train with multiple coaches of different styles or an organized fight team to improve various aspects of their game at once. Cardiovascular conditioning, speed drills, strength training and flexibility are also important aspects of a fighter's training. Some schools advertise their styles as simply "mixed martial arts", which has become a style in itself, but the training will still often be split into different sections.
This workout, while possibly effective for some enthusiasts lacks some of the major elements needed for the dynamics of mma. Firstly, I noticed that there are no mention of deadlifts, KB swings or olympic lifts. I would think that anyone of an intermediate level in martial arts would be ready for and require these lifts. It is imperative that "endurance" is not the main focus, as you are supplementing lifting with the cardio necessary for competition. I believe that strength and performance are the pillars of any combat sport. Hereby, your goals, reps and lifts should further this idea.

Do 30 to 60 minutes of a moderate-intensity aerobic activity three or four days per week. Moderate-intensity activities include cycling, jogging, swimming and hitting a punching bag. This will help improve your cardiovascular system, which means more oxygen will be used throughout your body during your big fight. Your heart and lungs will work more efficiently and you will be less tired while you are fighting.

Work out at least four days a week, but no more than five. To get into optimal shape, and stay there, you should work out at least four days a week, alternating so you work out for two or three days and rest one. I don’t think you should ever work out for four and rest for three days. Your body needs a day of rest after a couple of hard days training. However resting two or three days routinely will derail the momentum of your training. If you workout too many days in a row without a break, you will do more harm than good, because the hard training you are doing is breaking down your body, and it needs adequate time to rest.
The truth is this: if you really put your mind to it, went back to school and graduated with an honors degree in exercise science, trained dozens of fighters in person and hundreds of fighters around the world while receiving feedback and tweaking the program to make it better and better, in about 10 years or so you could probably develop, perhaps, an equally effective strength and conditioning program for MMA yourself, just like I did with the Ultimate MM Strength and Conditioning Program.

best mma training program

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