MMA fighters train brutally hard to compete in their sport. Their workouts vary widely between working on skill-sets, extreme conditioning, and strength training. Some fighters also learn the hard way that it is possible to over-train for a fight, if you can believe it.  Fighting might come from some of the earliest most instinctual place of human evolution, but modern fighters have taken training and preparation to whole new levels.


Trainer Martin Rooney, according to an article on T-nation.com written by Rooney and Bryan Krahn, advises against spending too much time trying to find the ultimate training program. He sees too many fighters attempting to copy a famous fighter's workout in an attempt to emulate them, doing the latest fitness craze or doing endless circuits until they throw up. In his experience, the top fighters and trainers do low volume work, basic strength training and sprint work along with their technical work. In his mind, the keys to a good program are technical work combined with basic strength training and sprinting while also ensuring you get enough rest.

During an actual fight, you will be under a tremendous amount of stress. This often causes many people to tense up and actually hold their breath as they are fighting. Breathing is one of the most important and often neglected aspects of real street fighting training. Proper breathing promotes muscular relaxation and increases the speed and efficiency of your compound attack. The rate at which you breath will also determine how quickly your cardiorespiratory system can recover from a real street fight encounter. NOTE: Remember to always exhale when executing a striking tool or technique in a real street fighting situation.
This program will be an entire year in length and it's designed by seasoned martial arts trainer Doug Dupont. Doug has been a long-time jiu jitsu practitioner himself and has trained professional MMA fighters, as well. Here, in his own words, he explains the first training phase and what the next year will look like for those who choose to take on his training program:
Base your caloric consumption on your daily workout. On workout days, you'll need more calories from carbs and protein to keep your body going. Plan fuller, more protein-packed meals on workout days and lighter meals on your rest days. Matching your diet to your caloric needs will help keep your body fueled and able to power through tough workouts.
If Le Corre’s description of ancient warriors jumping and climbing walls seems incongruous with traditional combat training, the regimen appears even funkier in present day. Video of McGregor training before his fight with Aldo appeared online last year. It shows a montage of the fighter performing drills – presumably cobbled together in a random sequence – that might seem culled from the B-reel of a Bruce Lee movie.
Movement training prizes a combination of mindfulness, timing and precision drills that are seemingly arbitrary – like catching wooden sticks or marauding on all-fours like a panther – and seeks to optimize one’s spacial awareness while in a fight. The training is said to help fighters navigate the rigors of combat with a sixth sense – meant distinctly for hyper-alertness – and if seized on properly, can endow an air of supreme of calm.
In preliminary results reported in April 2012 as part of an ongoing study of a 109 professional boxers and MMA fighters being conducted by Dr. Charles Bernick and his colleagues at Cleveland Clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, fighters with more than six years of ring experience were observed to have reductions in size in their hippocampus and thalamus, while fighters with more than twelve years of ring experience were observed to have both reductions in size and symptoms such as memory loss (the hippocampus and thalamus deal with memory and alertness). Dr. Bernick speculates that the cumulative damage over time from lesser blows may eventually prove an even more important topic of study than that of infrequent concussions.[179]

Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Perform sport-specific, strength-training moves using body-weight exercises. MMA coach Doug Balzarini recommends integrating movements -- such as the sit-out, bear crawl, sprawl and complex inchworm -- to prepare for a fight. Each of these movements improves balance while working core, upper and lower-body muscle groups. Include these exercises with your resistance-training workouts, performing three to four sets of 10 to 12 reps each.
Get your first fight out of the way. Once you've got some experience training under your belt, ask one of your trainers to hook you up with a fight locally and get a feel for what competing in MMA is like. If it goes well and you like it, continue booking fights as often as your training schedule permits. Trust your trainer to find a good match against someone with a similar skill level.
I have been participating in Easton's BJJ program for over two years, and it has been a consistently positive influence in my life since I began.  I have seen vast improvements in both my fitness level, emotional well-being, and overall discipline in all things that I do.  I truly enjoy both the coaching and the community that are offered at Easton. Highly recommended!
Studying history, you can learn to identify patterns that define racist behaviors, and recognize these patterns in the present. You can see how racist rhetoric and actions have shifted over time, and how they continue to exist and affect us today. This insight will provide you with an understanding of how to better fight these patterns, and how to make racism a thing of the past, a subject of history.
Fit to Fight®’s Hard Ready™ is a unique course, that was designed to address THE single most important, and non-variable component to conflict: Emotional preparedness. Hard Ready™ is very much about addressing our own personal habits and modifying them in small, progressive ways to create a compounding effect concerning overall self-sovereignty. Ultimately, the ability to control ones emotions is the single most important variable in any situation. A strong connection is made between physical exertion, more specially interval training and the demands placed on human beings under heavy levels of stress. The classroom activities of the Hard Ready™ Program are designed to harden emotional resolve but also to address the emotional dynamic that pervades actual altercations. Pre-Emptive Striking is the foundation of the actual “fighting” part of the program, though “support system” lessons delve further into the physical anatomy of fighting. A great focus is also put on the most effective fighting systems including Wrestling, Boxing, Muay Thai and BJJ.
Mayweather doesn’t use free weights often; he prefers to build upper body strength in different ways. Other than hitting the mitts, which is Mayweather’s favorite way to work his arms, his go-to equipment is a medicine ball. Holding the medicine ball in both hands, he’ll throw the ball up, catch it, push it up, then bring it down again and repeat. And when he’s not using a medicine ball, he’s supplementing his workout with bodyweight exercises. For a workout that doesn’t require weights, check out The No-Gym, No Excuses Workout.

If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
What is it? The literal Hebrew translation of Krav Maga is “battle contact” and we can’t think of a better description. It was developed by the Israeli Defense Force to be used in real-life combat situations. In addition to punches, kicks and throws, it teaches real-life scenarios like how to disarm an attacker. Rubber knives and guns will make appearances.
I attended the Alan Belcher MMA club in Dlbverville while I was in tech training at Keesler AFB this year. I wanted to find something that kept me engaged and active through all that studying. Never boxed before, these lady and gentleman were patient with me and I grew a love for boxing. I saw results regardless of if I was eating right (If I ate right would have been a lot more) the owner taught many of the classes! Now that I've graduated and went back home I just wanted to give a review to say If you're thinking about trying it you should!
Ethnic Studies programs are not limited to members of their own ethnic groups, however. White students can and should participate in Ethnic Studies programs as well. This can help participants forge a less ethnocentric understanding of history, avoid repeating the mistakes of their predecessors, and learn how to work in solidarity with members of oppressed minorities.
The UFC® Mixed Martial Arts (MMA) athlete is the best-trained athlete in the world.* Preparing for competition in the Octagon™ requires a regimen of cross-functional training that builds exceptional strength, stamina, and discipline through the practice of Mixed Martial Arts. With our unique access to UFC champions, many of whom serve as trainers and coaches, UFC GYM offers elite training programs available to members of all ages and abilities. Each club offers a variety of MMA training and classes for men, women, and kids, including: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Muay Thai, Judo, boxing, kickboxing, and other mixed disciplines. MMA classes promote endurance, conditioning, proper technique and intelligent sequencing, so you can surpass your goals quickly. Additionally, the UFC GYM School of Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu is now registered with the IBJJF, allowing our students to compete in local, national and internationally acclaimed BJJ tournaments.
The pair spoke to Menshealth.com in New York City on Tuesday after Bellator held an event to announce that it signed a nine-figure, multi-year deal with the live sports streaming subscription service, DAZN. That partnership will have DAZN streaming 22 annual Bellator events, beginning with the Jackson-Silva mega bout headlining the Sept. 29 card at the SAP Center in San Jose, California. (Think of DAZN it as the Netflix for sports, although the company’s CEO, James Rushton, hasn’t divulged a monthly price just yet. Still, it’s enough for the UFC to definitely raise an eyebrow).
Mixed martial arts appear everywhere. For example, mixed martial arts events and personalities appear in just about every magazine such as GQ, Newsweek, Time, Playboy as well as smaller publications like Black Belt Magazine (for a complete list of mixed martial arts magazines, see my list below). Mixed martial arts also frequently appear in television shows, xbox games and movies. Mixed martial arts have their reality TV shows such as Tapout, The Ultimate Fighter and Caged that focus exclusively on the life of mixed martial arts personalities. Mixed martial arts also have their own unique workout gear and clothing line such as Tapout, Bad Boy MMA, Affliction, Cage Fighter and Xtreme Couture. For better or worse, it seems like mixed martial arts has taken over the world. 

These are the current top 10 MMA Gyms in the world based on how many top 15 ranked UFC fighters they currently train. There are 160 fighters, who train at over 80 different gyms, in the top 15 of the UFC's 10 divisions. The rankings are based on a system where a champion earns their gym 25 points, A #1 contender is 15, a #2 contender 10 and then a decrease in ranking equaling a decrease of 1 point until the ranking reaches #10. From there, rankings 11-15 are each worth 1 point. (updated July 2015):[68]
“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”
In general, the injury pattern in MMA is very similar to that in professional boxing but unlike that found in other combat sports such as judo and taekwondo.[170] The most commonly injured body region is the head (66.8% to 78.0% of reported injuries) followed by the wrist/hand (6.0% to 12.0% of reported injuries), while the most frequent types of injury were laceration (36.7% to 59.4% of reported injuries), fracture (7.4% to 43.3% of reported injuries), and concussion (3.8% to 20.4% of reported injuries).[170] The frequency of impact to the ear and low utilization of ear protection leads to a high frequency of perichondral hematoma that can lead to cauliflower ear.[178]

Much has been said about McGregor’s prowess in the cage, but the UFC featherweight champion claims his competitive edge isn’t just the product of freak talent or gruelling hours spent walloping a heavy bag. Rather, McGregor attributes much of his recent form to movement training – a regimen that champions free-flowing bodily rhythm and a merging of the mental and physical aspects of fighting.
Before I show you any actual fighting techniques, you need a posture or stance that will maximize your offensive techniques and provide defensive protection. In my Contemporary Fighting Arts, I teach my students a broad scope of strategic stances that protect your center line during a street fight. But for purposes of this how to article, I will only address the fighting stance. But, in order to better appreciate the fighting stance you should have a basic understanding of the center line theory. Basically, the center line is an imaginary vertical line that divides your body in half. Located on this line are some of your most vital anatomical targets that you must protect in a street fight. These targets include the eyes, nose, chin, throat, solar plexus and groin. Your center line is best protected by using a fighting stance that strategically position your targets away from direct hits.
Parents Charged in Death of Missing Culver City Baby Put His Body in Suitcase and Threw it Away: LADA House Approves Bill to Expand Background Checks for Gun Sales and TransfersChain-Reaction Crash Involving 131 Vehicles Leaves 1 Dead, 71 Others Injured in WisconsinLAPD Seek Robbery Suspects, Man Impersonating Officer in 3 Separate Incidents at Chinatown Jewelry Stores
You don't have to be a professional MMA fighter to go a few rounds at home, but you might benefit from trying an MMA workout designed by a professional fighter. Chris Camozzi, an 18-time UFC veteran who is constantly training for his next big fight, designed the following program to give you an MMA workout experience to try at home. All you need is a heavy bag, boxing gloves, hand wraps and a jump rope to kick your conditioning routine into high gear.
Learning to speak a second language can be very helpful if you intend to work with immigrant populations. With a recent marked increase in xenophobic and anti-immigrant attitudes and activities, there is a lot of work to be done with immigrants and refugees in regards to fighting racism. Many immigrants in the US are unable to defend themselves in court or secure legal counsel because of limited English-speaking skills, as well as limited monetary resources. Depending on your situation, you may even be able to offer legal services pro-bono to those who need them. This, especially in the case of immigrants and refugees who face danger in their countries of origin, can be a literal matter of life or death.
In a recent meta-analysis of the available injury data in MMA, the injury incidence rate was estimated to be 228.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures (one athlete-exposure is defined as one athlete participating in a single fight).[170] The estimated injury incidence rate in MMA is greater than in other full-contact combat sports such as judo (44.0 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[171] taekwondo (79.4 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[172] amateur boxing (77.7 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures),[173] and professional boxing (118.0-250.6 injuries per 1000 athlete-exposures).[174][175][176][177]

Karate, especially Kyokushin and other full contact styles, has proven to be effective in the sport as it is one of the core foundations of kickboxing, and specializes in striking techniques.[107][108][109][110] Various styles of karate are practiced by some MMA fighters, notably Chuck Liddell, Bas Rutten, Lyoto Machida, Stephen Thompson, John Makdessi, Uriah Hall, Ryan Jimmo, Georges St-Pierre, Kyoji Horiguchi, and Louis Gaudinot. Liddell is known to have an extensive striking background in Kenpō with Fabio Martella[111] whereas Lyoto Machida practices Shotokan Ryu,[112] and St-Pierre practices Kyokushin.[113]
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."
“This is 70% of the entire plan. I can work out religiously, but if I’m not eating clean, I’m wasting my time. I eat five small meals a day that consist of protein, good carbs, and veggies. No cheat meals except once on Sunday. Here is a sample day of meals (accompanied by one gallon of water per day) that will get me into lean and mean fighting shape.”
Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.

Whether you intend to become a newspaper journalist, publishing in print and on the web, or a television reporter, or even an investigative documentarian, a degree in journalism can give you the mix of practical skills and critical knowledge necessary for spreading awareness of racial issues. A strong journalist is not satisfied with merely reporting surface issues, but wants deeper answers, and will do the necessary digging to get them. 

Eat like a modern day Caveman. Try and stick with the basic primitive food groups such as meats, vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds, but don’t get neurotic. What I mean by that is, try to be very mindful of what you’re eating, and though you probably don’t need that extra piece of bread, or potato, it won’t be the end of the world if you eat it, and you do only live once. So unless you are training for an event where you have to lose weight, eat clean for the bulk of your meals, but don’t deprive yourself of some of your simple dietary pleasures.

Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
There are two primary training methods in this phase: random flowing and sparring. In random flowing there is a level of cooperation, where practitioners are helping each other to learn with a level of give-and-take. Specific goals may be worked on. In sparring, practitioners are only indirectly helping each other to learn. The focus of sparring is on beating your opponent in live training.

“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
This program will help you maintain or improve the range of motion about your joints and surrounding muscles; reducing the risk of injury and promoting performance. Many times our common hamstring, back and knee pain can be caused from inflexibility and tight structures. Following an organized strteching program can usually eliminate these. Are you an athlete? Being able to move through a full range of motion can increase power output by optimizing biomechanical leverage position.
Choose from a growing library of workouts ranging from 15-45 minutes in length and in difficulty from beginner to advanced. If you’re new to boxing, our 12 week Prospect Path teaches you the basics through expert-led instructional videos and specially curated workouts. If you’re coming in with prior experience, our Intermediate and Advanced workouts will give you the challenge you’re looking for.
Study mat wrestling. If you're young and just starting out, consider joining your school's wrestling team to get a good foundation in mat wrestling and get experience fighting in a controlled environment. It might not be as flashy as what happens in the UFC, but learning the fundamentals of amateur wrestling will make you a stronger fighter in the long run, building your mat skills and your endurance. It's also a great way to keep tabs on your weight and get into good fighting shape.[1]
Try an MMA class to learn more varied techniques. Many local gyms offer MMA classes, and some gyms ("MMA gyms") are centered entirely around martial arts. Trying an MMA class once a week or few weeks can help you learn new techniques and spar with other MMA fighters. Incorporate this into your schedule, especially if you are not training with a coach or other MMA athletes.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
I know this might sound trivial but its worth mentioning to a beginner who wants to survive and hopefully win a street fight. Keep your chin slightly angled down when you assume any type of fighting stance. This placement will initially seem strange to you but its what every boxer, kick boxer and mma fighter will do when they square off with an opponent. Lowing your head and chin make you a more elusive target and also helps minimize direct strikes to your eyes, nose, jaw, chin and throat. However, avoid forcing your chin down too low during the fight. This will inhibit the mechanical fluidity of your tools and techniques and ultimately slow you down during a street fight.
OK so for the Intermediate Level, we’re adding time and volume. Can you cut the mustard? We’re keeping the exercises the same but the rounds are now the full UFC length, which is 5 minutes and I want to challenge you to add volume too. That means we’re taking the Burpees and Swings up to 15 reps and the Jumping Jacks go to 30. The Turkish Get Up round should have you adding 1 or 2 reps as well.
There are multiple contrasting studies on whether the addition of more frequent high intensity endurance training yielded any performance improvements. Some researchers found athletes that don't respond well to high volume low-intensity training showed greater improvements when they increased their frequency and volume of high intensity training. However on the contrary, the benefits of performing more high intensity training in already well-trained athletes, are limited.
Studying history, you can learn to identify patterns that define racist behaviors, and recognize these patterns in the present. You can see how racist rhetoric and actions have shifted over time, and how they continue to exist and affect us today. This insight will provide you with an understanding of how to better fight these patterns, and how to make racism a thing of the past, a subject of history.

Along with varying training intensity, there are many other factors that affect a fighter’s performance and health. Stress reduction, proper nutrition, sufficient sleep, and other recovery techniques are vital to a fighter’s health and performance over time. Like I said before, most of these guys already train too much, are banged up, and are nursing some type of injury. The “more is better” mentality usually leaves them tired, injured, or burned out if it is not addressed.
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.
Explosive lifts are an important aspect for boxing and you should implement this style with your every day flat bench press. Bring the bar down at a normal pace and then explode up to complete the rep. You may have to work with a slightly lighter weight than you are accustomed to and that is not the most important thing here, so don’t lose any sleep over it. The motion will help you with jabbing and the power needed behind them for added effectiveness, as well as push off skills to avoid a clench.
Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast
Systems Training Centers serve Southern California, from Hawthorne in the South Bay to Encino in San Fernando Valley and everything in between. In addition to offering classes to the local community, Systems Training Centers also specialize in personal training, private training groups and corporate accounts. Systems Training Center have corporate accounts with companies such as Space-X; school contracts with schools such as Crossroads in Santa Monica; and collaborations with law enforcement such as Los Angeles Sheriff’s Department, UCLA PD, Santa Monica PD and much more!

Explosive lifts are an important aspect for boxing and you should implement this style with your every day flat bench press. Bring the bar down at a normal pace and then explode up to complete the rep. You may have to work with a slightly lighter weight than you are accustomed to and that is not the most important thing here, so don’t lose any sleep over it. The motion will help you with jabbing and the power needed behind them for added effectiveness, as well as push off skills to avoid a clench.
I trained couple of months with BJJ as a noob last year. Five minutes of grappling does a lot of cardio. Way better than repeatedly running in treadmills. I recommend anyone who works out and lift weights to take interest in MMA. It’s not complete but it’s the closest thing that can *possibly* save you in street fight. Street fights are usually quick, dirty, and intense. You are either in Fight, Flight, or Freeze mode. Your body has to know and react fast enough. Whatever happens do NOT ever end up in freeze mode. When your brain shuts off. Like your body can do a lot of things you thought it was impossible when it is loaded with adrenaline and the feeling of “rush”. Like that teenage guy who lifted a car off to rescue his uncle. I think that was on the news last time.
Elite MMA is the top mixed martial arts (MMA) training facility in the greater Houston area, with school locations in Houston, Baytown, Greenway Plaza and Kingwood. We are experts in the instruction of self-defense, muay thai, kickboxing, boxing, mixed martial arts (MMA) and Brazilian Ju Jitsu (BJJ), offering these essential classes across Houston. We pride ourselves on providing an environment for fun, happiness, and personal growth each day we come together. Thank you for coming to our web site.
Tuttle Publishing has produced many excellent martial arts books in the past and I'd like to add this book to my list. As the title says it is primarily covers "Mixed Martial Arts Fighting Techniques" plus mentions some self- defense techniques not allowed in MMA contests for use in a bad street or life threatening situations. However, I view the entire book as a self- defense book because what is used for MMA can also be used in most self- defense situations!!!
Danny Indio is certified as an Apprentice Instructor in Jeet Kune Do Concepts and Filipino Martial Arts under Sifu Dan Anderson (a student of the famous Guro Dan Inosanto) in New York City. He has trained under many instructors, such as Vitor "Shaolin" Ribeiro and Paul Vunak. He is also a Muay Thai instructor. Indio was a Marine Corps Martial Arts Instructor from 2001-2003. He has over ten years of experience teaching martial arts, and has fought—and won—numerous matches in boxing, grappling tournaments and stick fighting competitions.
Even with the natural progression of MMA to more “well rounded” approaches, purer forms of boxing were employed by only a handful of fighters. This is likely because leagues of athletes followed in the footsteps of these pioneers who tended to use more of a forward moving Muay Thai or Kickboxing based approach rooted in power techniques as opposed to the finesse and lateral movement hallmark to many of the greatest boxers. And for good reason, boxing by itself is a liability in MMA because of the variety of offenses available that pure boxing technique does not account for (e.g. kicks, takedowns, clinch, etc.). In fact, the emergence of boxing techniques as an effective arsenal in the cage was squashed in UFC 1 when boxer Art Jimmerson, sporting one boxing glove on his lead hand, was taken down and submitted in just a couple of minutes.
Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
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