Choose from a growing library of workouts ranging from 15-45 minutes in length and in difficulty from beginner to advanced. If you’re new to boxing, our 12 week Prospect Path teaches you the basics through expert-led instructional videos and specially curated workouts. If you’re coming in with prior experience, our Intermediate and Advanced workouts will give you the challenge you’re looking for.
“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast

I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.


In both workouts, I'm using the most underutilized form of low intensity training - low intensity circuits. Instead of picking only 1 modality, let's say running, we're able to change the stimulus and muscles worked by switching exercises every 15-20 minutes. As long as we keep our heart rate in Zone 2, aerobic adaptations will be made. If we to only choose running, the endurance of our shoulders and arms would be neglected - not ideal for an MMA fighter. 
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
“As the Training Coordinator for the defensive tactics and use of force for our department, I’ve encountered dozens of styles and systems of defense. The simple truth is that in police work, as well as your typical bar fight, the altercation ends up on the ground about 70% of the time. These are FBI statistics that remain constant year after year. To survive and overcome a situation like this, you need training that focuses on simplicity, realism, and proven methods. This is the training you will get at the Warrior’s Cove. The staff is respectful, helpful and eager to see you make progress. Their system of martial arts cross training is by far the most enlightened I’ve come across in my 11 years of law enforcement.”
Even though Systems Training Center has some very talented instructors, our focus is on our member experience and customer service. Whether people train in fitness, self-defense or fighting, we pride ourselves on offering martial arts and fitness classes that continue to inspire, motivate and empower our students. This mindset shows as we have many members who have been with us since we first opened. Often, they don’t just train themselves, but their kids, parents, and siblings train at the gym too!
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.

Every fighter understands the value of explosive power in combat sports and many believe that interval training is a great way to this sought after quality. Although this can certainly be true if the right interval methods are used, many of the most commonly used interval methods – Tabata intervals in particular among them – are not the most effective tools for this specific purpose.


10) Chicks dig fighters. Women love violence. They will say things like “I hate violence. I hate those meathead guys that fight all the time.” The women who say things like this have one thing in common: they're lying. Women absolutely love men who handle violent confrontation and come up the winner. It's in their nature, it's in their DNA. Something you won't read in a newspaper: Ghetto thugs who often beat up weak people are rewarded with sex by their ghetto mistresses. You're smarter than fighting all the time – but simply being able to handle violent confrontation (having the Eye of the Tiger) is enough to get them wet.

Our new members include men & women that range from the total beginner, to professional fighters and high ranking martial art instructors.  Everyone starts at a level appropriate for their existing skills, and advances at their own pace. In every class, we divide beginners into one group, and intermediate-advanced into a second group. No matter what your skill level or fitness level, our instructors will make your transition into class easy and enjoyable! Click Here if you want to read over 150 Reviews from Warrior’s Cove Members!
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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