“Thank you for your great school. Not only is the instruction great but the entire atmosphere is warm, professional and energizing. I am now living in Orange County (South of L.A) and I am preparing for law school entrance tests. I really miss the Warrior’s Cove! Although I had no prior instruction in martial arts, I felt that your school was first class. My belief was confirmed as I tried to find a school to train at here in California. There are many good schools in the area but I wish one of them was yours. I realize now how important it is to learn good positional control skills first, and I appreciate the fact that you hold off on submissions until a degree of skill & experience has been achieved. Those I have talked to here are unfamiliar with such restrictions, and I think It has definitely been to my advantage. We are planning on moving back to MN after a few years out here, and I hope you are still instructing. Sorry the letter is so long, but I wanted to thank you. Take care.”


I have come a long way since my first week and am now (11-15-04) a 3rd degree white belt on my way to my gold belt. I can’t wait to have enough experience to make it to gold so that I am able to start the submission moves. I already feel so much stronger and well balanced. My asthma has also been tamed to the point where I’m barely using my inhaler. Thanks to Warrior’s Cove I have a new found confidence in myself and the art and I know that I will actually ‘earn’ my way to new ranks. I’d rather be a white belt at Warrior’s Cove than a higher rank anywhere else. Thank you…”
The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”
Phoenix has her mentor, Lisa Wheeler in. Lisa was a modern dancer turned fitness professional.  Phoenix and Lisa talk about what it is like behind the scenes of the fitness workouts they film for Daily Burn's popular at home fitness videos. Lisa speaks of her goal to create great work and being good to people.  She shares what the business of fitness is really like, having been in the business for 25 years already.
There are multiple contrasting studies on whether the addition of more frequent high intensity endurance training yielded any performance improvements. Some researchers found athletes that don't respond well to high volume low-intensity training showed greater improvements when they increased their frequency and volume of high intensity training. However on the contrary, the benefits of performing more high intensity training in already well-trained athletes, are limited.
For world-class fighting at its highest level, look no further than July’s five-rounder between strawweight champion Joanna Jedrzejczyk and Claudia Gadelha. An intense fight from start to finish, Jedrzejczyk proved her championship mettle in the toughest fight of her career, and Gadelha showed that she has the talent and determination to make another run at the crown.
^ Brownell, Susan Elaine (1990). The olympic movement on its way into Chinese culture. University of California, Santa Barbara. pp. 29, 63. In both ancient China and Greece, the most popular sports were probably wrestling, boxing, and combinations thereof (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai). The same might be argued for ancient Egypt, India and Japan. [...] In both ancient China and Greece, the no-holds-barred combat sport (Greek pankration, Chinese leitai) was probably the most popular one. 

In 1980, CV Productions, Inc. created the first regulated MMA league in the United States, called Tough Guy Contest, which was later renamed Battle of the Superfighters. The company sanctioned ten tournaments in Pennsylvania. However, in 1983 the Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill prohibiting the sport.[5][6] In 1993, the Gracie family brought Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, developed in Brazil from the 1920s, to the United States by founding the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) MMA promotion company. The company held an event with almost no rules, mostly due the influence of Art Davie and Rorion Gracie attempting to replicate Vale Tudo fights that existed in Brazil,[4] and would later implement a different set of rules (example: eliminating kicking a grounded opponent), which differed from other leagues which were more in favour of realistic fights.[7]

“Mr. Arnebeck will spar or grapple with me any time I ask. This is important to me, it shows he is the real deal. If I have a new technique to try or if I don’t think a technique is good, he will work though it with me on the mat and explain verbally why it will or won’t work. Mr. Arnebeck is not afraid to be tested by me on a weekly basis and realizes that I won’t learn as much if he uses all of his abilities against me while sparring or grappling. By allowing the playing field to be more even, I learn faster. He does this by allowing me to achieve a position, a hold, a sweep etc, that I normally wouldn’t be able to achieve, so I can improve. If I have technique questions, he will answer them and probably ask me to try it on him several times so he is sure I understand it. He also knows that everyone is unique physically and mentally and shouldn’t be forced into the same mold. He has always told me to use the tools he has given me but to develop my own individual style of BJJ.”
Anthony Yom – Yom is an AP Calculus teacher in the Los Angeles Unified School District, an area with a high population of underprivileged minority youth. His school contends with a 91% poverty rate. Despite many hurdles, Yom has achieved remarkable success with his students on the AP Calculus exam, with a 100% pass rate, and high average score. Yom is also the winner of our 2016 Escalante-Gradillas Prize for Best in Education.

“I was very impressed with your program and instructors. I found your school very well taught.  I am a police officer (retired) and my daughter is going to school for law enforcement.  I know very well that most fights end in ground fighting and wanted her to learn how to defend herself and boost her confidence.  Your school fit the bill completely.”
You say you’re a streetfighter/boxer right? And female? Mother of two kids? Who are you tell anyone of any height or weight that shouldn’t learn some self defence? You’re no better that told that poor woman which clearly asked for logical and practical advice on protecting herself as what anger management will accomplish? How will it accomplish if she is the one been physically attacked. I’m a short woman myself and fought many in my time and still kicking. I’ve fought both girls and guys but I rather to train with guys as gives me the drive to become stronger. Yes, they’re stronger and taller than I am but that don’t stop me from actually finding a way and beating their ass which I have. The men fear me in my dojo because I’ve proven no matter how short fat skinny masculine or gender. It is the spirit of the individuals strength and determination. I train in Hapkido, taekwondo, muay Thai kickboxing and cage even done boxing too. I’m respected where I train, and I train with men that enjoy doing it with me and I ain’t afraid to take a hit even dish it. I’m ashamed and disappointed in your view as any proper teacher would not be pleased with your opinions. Seems to be, you’ll never understand the concept what she is experiencing as never had to worry due to the fact you had to be one of those enjoyed going around beating others. As for women love violence, what a load of shit! Again, you must be implying those who are beaten by thier spouses must loved been treated that way, or victims of rape/murder must loved it too. You had hypocrited yourself, and shamed your so called femininity.
In February 12, 1963, three karatekas from Oyama dojo (kyokushin later) went to the Lumpinee Boxing Stadium in Thailand and fought against three Muay Thai fighters. The three kyokushin karate fighters were Tadashi Nakamura, Kenji Kurosaki and Akio Fujihira (also known as Noboru Osawa), while the Muay Thai team of three had only one authentic Thai fighter.[26] Japan won 2–1: Tadashi Nakamura and Akio Fujihira both knocked out their opponents with punches while Kenji Kurosaki, who fought the Thai, was knocked out by elbows. It should be noted that the Japanese fighter who lost, Kenji Kurosaki, was a kyokushin instructor, rather than a contender, and that he had stood in as a substitute for the absent chosen fighter. In June of the same year, karateka and future kickboxer Tadashi Sawamura faced top Thai fighter Samarn Sor Adisorn: Sawamura was knocked down sixteen times on his way to defeat.[26] Sawamura went on to incorporate what he learned in that fight in kickboxing tournaments.
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