Develop your mental game. When you start competing, learn to block out the losses and the wins alike. Always look forward to your next fight, pausing only briefly to consider your victories and your failures in the ring. Dwelling on your past fights is only good for learning what you can do better and how you can improve to increase your chances of being victorious in your next fight.
Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.
Brave welterweight champion Jarrah Al-Selawe defends his title for the first time, at Brave 23 vs. Abdoul Abdouraguimov, and even more is on the line still. His coach Samy Aljamal explains: "I truly believe in Al-Selawe's potential to make history for Jordan. He is the man to put the country on the map for MMA fans and I feel like he's already Jordan's best-ever fighter. He will have the opportunity to assert himself and I'm confident he will take it." 'The Jordanian Lion' is undefeated in the Brave cage, but faces the biggest challenge of his career -  The French-Russian ground wizard Abdouraguimov hasn't lost as a professional and is 2-0 at Brave, with dominating victories over Sidney Wheeler and Rodrigo Cavalheiro.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.

Also, keep in mind, we want to do this as a conditioning routine. This is a way to get into fighting shape, but not prepare for a fight. This routine, may or may not be good for an MMA fighter, honestly, I don’t know because I’m not one! What I do know is the following workout(s) are my answer to my own question, how do you develop the conditioning to go 25 minutes in the octagon?  So we develop and we progress.  Start with 3 minute rounds and we’ll work up to the 5.
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
Because each training method we use has a weakness, it's important to use a mix of methods so that every necessary element is trained. We can't strike our partners with full force, so we include pad drills to work on speed and power. It's unsafe to train defense against random attacks at full speed and power, so we use prearranged or scenario training to do that. The important thing is to identify the weak point in each training method and be sure you've got another that compensates for it.
Managing fatigue: As you progress through this workout, you will feel a new sense of fatigue. Stay active throughout the round and use the Jumping Jacks to actively recover from the Burpees and Swings. Think about a UFC round in a fight for a second, it’s not balls to the wall the whole 5 minutes. When that happens the fighter gasses out way early. You have to find out how to push hard and manage your fatigue on the fly. That’s the sign of a professional.
Shadowing is not only a tool to practice your technique and craft but it's also an opportunity for the fighter to create certain scenarios that could actually happen in a fight. You may be up against an opponent who moves a lot and may have to play the role of a come forward aggressive fighter, attacking with good power jabs, head movement and feints to get the fighter on the defensive; or to break the fighter’s rhythm to get close or cut the cage off to stop the movement of that fighter. Or you can be up against an aggressive come forward fighter and you may have to play the role of the slick mover using angles, pivots to keep the aggressive bull off you playing the role of a matador. These are just a couple of scenarios that need to be played out during your career as a fighter because best believe one day you will come across a fighter of that particular style and repetition is the only way to get it done.
Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
Hire an MMA coach or personal trainer to improve faster. If you're serious about MMA fighting and want to make a career out of it, you'll need professional help. A personal trainer or coach can help you plan workout schedules, boost motivation during training sessions, and identify areas of improvement. Ask other MMA fighters for their trainer recommendations or look for personal trainers in your area who specialize in MMA.

Bookers often like to book shark-fish fights, pairing an inexperienced fish (in this case, you) with a killer fighter in the hopes of packing the house to see a bloodbath. Try your best to avoid being thrust into one of these types of situations for your first fight. It would be discouraging to have to compete against a much more experienced fighter.
In preliminary results reported in April 2012 as part of an ongoing study of a 109 professional boxers and MMA fighters being conducted by Dr. Charles Bernick and his colleagues at Cleveland Clinic's Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, fighters with more than six years of ring experience were observed to have reductions in size in their hippocampus and thalamus, while fighters with more than twelve years of ring experience were observed to have both reductions in size and symptoms such as memory loss (the hippocampus and thalamus deal with memory and alertness). Dr. Bernick speculates that the cumulative damage over time from lesser blows may eventually prove an even more important topic of study than that of infrequent concussions.[179]
“At the age of 44, I was severely overweight and developing some very painful arthritis that was limiting my ability to exercise, especially the sport that I loved most, basketball. I decided that I needed to get serious about controlling my weight, and wanted to find an activity that would be challenging and vigorous, without aggravating the damage to my joints. I’ve found all that and more with the cross training at Warrior’s Cove. After a year and a half of training at Warrior’s Cove, I’ve lost about 40 pounds, I’m stronger, more flexible and more energetic. I’m starting to feel like an athlete again! I’ve also discovered a lifelong pursuit that will continue to challenge and engage me. I highly recommend Warrior’s Cove to anyone of any age that’s looking for a positive and supportive place to work out and learn new skills.”
Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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