“The instructors are friendly and informative and want you to learn. I think Josh, Andrew, Bob, Juan and Randy have done an excellent job of teaching and taking the time to show us the techniques however many times it takes and to give us one on one demonstrations as well. It’s a safe atmosphere in which to learn and I feel like I’m getting real self-defense training that could be useful in the future.  I am also enjoying the sport of Jiu Jitsu as well as getting back into shape.  I already have recommended the Warrior’s Cove to several people that I work with, as well as friends.  This has truly been a great experience for me, in that I am learning a useful skill and sport while having fun and getting in shape at the same time.   I’ve wrestled and taken Martial Arts before, but this is a realistic mixture of both that I plan on doing for a long time.  I also would like to get back into competition sometime in the future.”

Ethnic Studies programs are not limited to members of their own ethnic groups, however. White students can and should participate in Ethnic Studies programs as well. This can help participants forge a less ethnocentric understanding of history, avoid repeating the mistakes of their predecessors, and learn how to work in solidarity with members of oppressed minorities.

MMA is a raw sport that is evolving into an incredible chess match of mind, body, and will. It is sport and competition in its purest form. It is exciting to watch the sport evolve and is rewarding to help young athletes chase and achieve their dreams. I truly hope that this information helps you get more out of your training and enables you to perform at a higher level.


According to ScorecardMMA.com, one of the world’s top statistical rankings services for MMA,[64] and the only one currently ranking MMA promotions worldwide statistically; "To rank MMA Promotions we use an index that we calculate weekly- Promotion Score.Promo Score calculation is based on the strength of Events and Fighters that Promotion has at that time. Promo Score has three main components:

Judo is $8 a lesson, no lock in contracts. I can train pretty much anywhere in the world. BUT also some nights I’d rock up and apart from the Sensei I’m the only adult there. Also training with young bucks is annoying because they’re always trying to beat you and don’t appreciate I’m over 40 and don’t bounce back from injuries nor can I afford them.
How is it that simulating a fight through shadow boxing can lead to more efficient, effective, and faster striking? Well, there is a ton of research on the benefits of deliberate practice for building fluency (i.e. performing automatically, quickly, and accurately) with any skill. Fluency results in relaxation. Relaxation results in effortless speed and power. Consider the 100-meter sprinter. He runs his best time when he’s running hard but relaxed. This relaxed exertion requires the fighter to find the right balance through practice to keep the tension out of his shoulders while directing his energy to strike at the opportune time. Relaxed exertion also positively impacts endurance-capabilities as it allows the fighter to be highly efficient in their striking.

“I love jiu-jitsu ... I started out as a jiu-jitsu guy. I never claimed that I’m some world-class striker, that’s everybody else. I’ve always said I’m a jiu-jitsu guy at heart, that’s how I started. And I’m more than happy to get into a grappling battle with Jon. I think that Jon puts everything together really really well. He’s really smart, he makes really good decisions, especially on the fly. But in a jiu-jitsu match, I don’t think there’s a world that exists that Jon Jones beats me in jiu-jitsu. It just doesn’t happen.” h/t MMA News • Listen to UFC Unfiltered Podcast 

It's widely known that fights often end before their allotted time limit, either via a knockout (KO) or technical knockout (TKO) by strikes, or by submission (SUB). This differs from other sports such as hockey or basketball where the players are required to play the whole length of the game. In MMA, fighters have the unique ability to control how long the fight lasts. This has huge implications on training strategies as well as damage and concussion mitigation. A fighter could technically never train their conditioning and achieve all their MMA wins by first round knockout... But... we all know that strategy does NOT work against equally-skilled opponents; even the most brutal knockout artists can be taken into deep waters. Professional MMA fighters must have the appropriate amount of conditioning to last at a minimum, 15 minutes. Failing to do so will prevent you from competing at the highest level of the sport.
Get the basics down first. To get better at MMA, you'll need to become proficient in basic strikes and grappling techniques. The basic punches include hooks, jabs, straights, and uppercuts. [9] You'll also want to learn basic push and roundhouse kicks. In grappling, you'll want to learn the different positions and how to do basic moves like armbars, triangle chokes, and the rear naked choke.[10] Practice mastering these basic techniques before advancing to more elaborate techniques.
Maintain a healthy diet. Keep track of the things you're eating by writing down the different meals that you have throughout the day and counting your calorie and nutrient intake. You'll want to hydrate yourself and maintain a diet that's high in protein and carbohydrates. If you're training heavily, try to maintain a diet of 1 gram (0.035 oz) of carbs and protein per pound that you weigh. Your diet should also contain plenty of omega-3 fats and traditional vitamins and minerals.[17]

Don't overtrain. While being sore is natural, you don't want to overdo it. When you get physically fatigued, overly sore, or injured, take time off from training and let your body recover. If you don't let your body recover from training, you can become weaker and less focused. Fatigue, weakness, decreased performance, and constant muscle soreness are signs of overtraining.[12]
Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.

I was greeted by a man named David Arnebeck. I could tell that he had a fighters build and an abundance of confidence. He made me feel at ease as we discussed my martial arts history and goals. I told him that I had taken 4 years of Tae Kwon Do but still felt as thought I was no good in a ‘real’ situation. I was good at forms but lacked the real sparring experience. He told me that many students at Warrior’s Cove had joined because of the ‘true to life’ training. He said, ‘kicking the air will do you no good.’  He said many things that I also heard from Bruce Lee’s fighting philosophy. He had me convinced. I joined that week. I have now found what seems to be the most effective form of self defense and exercise.
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

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