You say you’re a streetfighter/boxer right? And female? Mother of two kids? Who are you tell anyone of any height or weight that shouldn’t learn some self defence? You’re no better that told that poor woman which clearly asked for logical and practical advice on protecting herself as what anger management will accomplish? How will it accomplish if she is the one been physically attacked. I’m a short woman myself and fought many in my time and still kicking. I’ve fought both girls and guys but I rather to train with guys as gives me the drive to become stronger. Yes, they’re stronger and taller than I am but that don’t stop me from actually finding a way and beating their ass which I have. The men fear me in my dojo because I’ve proven no matter how short fat skinny masculine or gender. It is the spirit of the individuals strength and determination. I train in Hapkido, taekwondo, muay Thai kickboxing and cage even done boxing too. I’m respected where I train, and I train with men that enjoy doing it with me and I ain’t afraid to take a hit even dish it. I’m ashamed and disappointed in your view as any proper teacher would not be pleased with your opinions. Seems to be, you’ll never understand the concept what she is experiencing as never had to worry due to the fact you had to be one of those enjoyed going around beating others. As for women love violence, what a load of shit! Again, you must be implying those who are beaten by thier spouses must loved been treated that way, or victims of rape/murder must loved it too. You had hypocrited yourself, and shamed your so called femininity.
In 1980, CV Productions, Inc. created the first regulated MMA league in the United States, called Tough Guy Contest, which was later renamed Battle of the Superfighters. The company sanctioned ten tournaments in Pennsylvania. However, in 1983 the Pennsylvania State Senate passed a bill prohibiting the sport.[5][6] In 1993, the Gracie family brought Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, developed in Brazil from the 1920s, to the United States by founding the Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) MMA promotion company. The company held an event with almost no rules, mostly due the influence of Art Davie and Rorion Gracie attempting to replicate Vale Tudo fights that existed in Brazil,[4] and would later implement a different set of rules (example: eliminating kicking a grounded opponent), which differed from other leagues which were more in favour of realistic fights.[7]
3) Training MMA is an excellent physical workout. Sparring (Boxing practice during training) or grappling (wrestling or ground-fighting practice) for 3-5 minute rounds is absolutely brutal cardio, which is why fighters are usually in top notch physical condition. There is no treadmill or stair-master in the world that can beat the benefits of practice fighting.

Much has been said about McGregor’s prowess in the cage, but the UFC featherweight champion claims his competitive edge isn’t just the product of freak talent or gruelling hours spent walloping a heavy bag. Rather, McGregor attributes much of his recent form to movement training – a regimen that champions free-flowing bodily rhythm and a merging of the mental and physical aspects of fighting.

MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”


Studying history, you can learn to identify patterns that define racist behaviors, and recognize these patterns in the present. You can see how racist rhetoric and actions have shifted over time, and how they continue to exist and affect us today. This insight will provide you with an understanding of how to better fight these patterns, and how to make racism a thing of the past, a subject of history.
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
“High resistance intervals” is a name I came up with to describe a particularly effective interval method aimed at improving the endurance of your most explosive fast-twitch muscle fibers. Although the endurance of these fibers will never be to the level of slow-twitch, it’s still possible to make large improvements in their endurance with the right type of training. The longer these explosive fibers can work before they fatigue and force you to slow down, the better your ability to maintain your power throughout a fight will be.
“I began Brazilian Jiu Jitsu training for the challenge.  Period.  As a relatively large individual, BJJ effectively negates many of my genetic advantages.  Better yet, BJJ turns said potentials against me.  Struggling against superiorly skilled opponents has bolstered my confidence, combat mastery, and most importantly, my ability to accept failure positively. I have evolved into a better athlete, fighter, and a more humble, balanced individual.  These progressions have been instrumental in my personal and professional development.  In its totality, I consider BJJ training for life, not merely battle.”

As a result of an increased number of competitors, organized training camps, information sharing, and modern kinesiology, the understanding of the effectiveness of various strategies has been greatly improved. UFC commentator Joe Rogan claimed that martial arts evolved more in the ten years following 1993 than in the preceding 700 years combined.[70]

I just read that this a good hobble for dudes but what about girls? I agree that this type of fighting would be more a use to me because it combines all the styles of fighting. As a female I don’t want to depend on someone on helping when I am in trouble. I mean, that would be nice but the changes of that happening are unlikely. I want to learn how to fight. No, I don’t have a bully or anyone that I want to fight. My only motivation is to learn.
^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said.

mixed martial arts training

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