“If you are a small man or are a woman and want the skills to fight off an attacker, my testimonial is a must read. I’m 5’7″ and weigh 140 pounds. I’m a small guy. In fact, my frame is very similar in size or smaller than many women. The beauty of MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu is that size doesn’t matter. I can defend myself in stand up punching and kicking situations, and take the fight to my opponent if needed. I now know that Judo throws and takedowns are easier for a shorter person because your center of gravity is lower and you can get under your opponent easier. If things go to the ground, I can submit or choke out an opponent who has 100+ pound weight advantage. Once on the ground everything equals out, and with training, you have a huge advantage. Your opponent will be a fish out of water. How can this be? MMA and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu (BJJ) aren’t dependent on athleticism, strength or fitness. You use your brain, not brawn, and the laws of physics (leverage) to defeat your opponent.”
My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
The new rules included the introduction of weight classes; as knowledge about submissions spread, differences in weight had become a significant factor. There are nine different weight classes in the Unified Rules of Mixed Martial Arts. These nine weight classes include flyweight (up to 125 lb / 56.7 kg), bantamweight (up to 135 lb / 61.2 kg), featherweight (up to 145 lb / 65.8 kg), lightweight (up to 155 lb / 70.3 kg), welterweight (up to 170 lb / 77.1 kg), middleweight (up to 185 lb / 83.9 kg), light heavyweight (up to 205 lb / 93.0 kg), heavyweight (up to 265 lb / 120.2 kg), and super heavyweight with no upper weight limit.[53]
Your shadow boxing should be set up in rounds with non-stop shadow boxing so that you can establish a good pace, similar to one you would have in a real life fighting situation. You could do two rounds of five minutes each, or if it’s a quick workout one round will be enough to get your body warm and loose. Some fighters find it beneficial to do more rounds and a shorter duration such as 30 seconds – one minute, with a 30 second break in between. Find the style that works best for you and execute. Another great way to warm up before stretching is jumping rope, many professional fighters/boxers swear up and down that jump roping helps establish a good fight flow.
It's not a traditional bodybuilding workout, but MMA fighting works all of the muscle groups in the body. For instance, hitting the heavy bag is equivalent to lifting weights. When your back is against the cage and you're working to get your opponent off you, that's equivalent to doing weighted squats and bench presses. You do training camps to prepare for fights, and that means sticking to your diet religiously and working out hard. It's not an easy lifestyle, but it keeps you fit.
Camron, thanks for the message. I would say that the number one priority would be skill development. Drilling, learning the technical aspects of striking and grappling. The S&C simply compliments the skill development, so 2-3 workouts per week is plenty. Stick to learning the basics of squatting, hinging, pushing, pulling and carrying heavy loads. Your success will come from lng term consistency, not short term intensity, so be patient, don’t overdo it and over time you will improve.
While you can’t depend on boxing solely as a skill, it is an important part of MMA training. The advantage of sharpening your boxing skill set is that you will improve your hand skills, and boxing includes a great deal of conditioning that will make you a stronger MMA fighter. Find an MMA gym with skilled boxing coaches that offer classes ranging from beginning skills to professional-level boxing. However, don’t expect to simply rely on those boxing skills. Many a tough boxer has been thrown to the ground by an expert wrestler.

get into fighting shape

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