Most styles have been adapted from their traditional forms, such as boxing stances, which lack effective counters to leg kicks, the Muay Thai stance, which is poor for defending against takedowns due to its static nature, and Judo or Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu techniques, which must be adapted for No Gi competition. It is common for a fighter to train with multiple coaches of different styles or an organized fight team to improve various aspects of their game at once. Cardiovascular conditioning, speed drills, strength training and flexibility are also important aspects of a fighter's training. Some schools advertise their styles as simply "mixed martial arts", which has become a style in itself, but the training will still often be split into different sections.
“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said.

mixed martial arts training

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