They say that boxing is dead and MMA is holding the smoking gun pointed towards it. While the “sweet science of pugilism” has certainly seen better days and it’s cage fighting brother sport has made major strides in the last decade, boxing is far from gone and certainly not forgotten. And it has had a boost in popularity due to a new organization, BKB, in which the fighters have to be in top shape due to the size – or lack thereof – of the fighting arena.
Former MMA fighter Joey Alvarado hosts this is a workout dvd which consists of MMA-inspired drills and shadow boxing along with body weight training exercises. It’s not as in-depth and complete as some of the systems we’re looking at (Such as Rushfit, TapoutXT2, etc) but Shadow-Jitsu is still an interesting workout. It’s a tough DVD to get through, and the trainer isn’t there to baby you, so if you aren’t self-motivated then this might not be your best bet. If you aren’t in pretty decent condition already you’ll have to skip some of this stuff, but don’t be a pussy – challenge yourself!

Unlike other self defense systems, Contemporary Fighting Arts recognizes the distinction between conventional and extreme street fighting situations and I have designed three unique street fighting programs that will give you the knowledge, skill and power to survive a life and death combat situation. These programs include: The Widowmaker Program, Feral Fighting Street Combat and Savage Street Fighting. Click on the links below to learn more about these state-of-the art fighting methods.
The best MMA training programs cover a range of skills. Gone are the days where one-dimensional grapplers submitted strikers with no knowledge of the ground game. While fighters will normally favor one area of fighting, a well-rounded fighter needs to be able to survive in every area of the game or face being overwhelmed outside his comfort zone. Furthermore, he will need to be able to put the separate aspects of the game together in actual MMA sessions.
There are plenty of variations on the phrase, “Those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeat it.” There is good reason for that: it is fundamentally true. Ignorance of history begets further ignorance in the present. Racism, hate, fear, and violence repeat, if not intensify, when we ignore the lessons that history holds for us. If we do not want to repeat the mistakes of our forbears, we must study them and grow from the experience.
May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.
Every combat sport athlete knows just how grueling training in the gym day in and day out can be. Because of this, it’s often important to use training methods that can improve conditioning without putting any additional wear and tear on your body. Made popular by the late Charlie Francis, tempo intervals fit this bill perfectly and are one of the best ways to build aerobic fitness and work capacity at the same time without the added risk of injury and stress that comes along with some of the higher intensity interval methods.

Zone 3 is called tempo training or intensive endurance training. This zone challenges the upper limits of the aerobic system. Lactate production starts to ramp up at this Zone, however, there is no significant accumulation as intensity is still relatively low and clearance levels are still high due to the adequate of supply of oxygen to the muscles.
In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
Despite our competition success, 90% of our students are actually just looking to get in the best shape of their life and learn effective self defense. The fact that we treat our beginners so professionally and with the highest level of patience is what has allowed us to become so successful. Our famous competition pedigree is a result of how well we tailor our classes for all ages and levels.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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