If you are a fan of MMA since its inception, you have had a front row seat to the birth and evolution of what we consider the greatest sport in the world; one that has lineage to ancient Greek Olympics, almost 3,000 years ago, rooted in wrestling and boxing. Much like the natural selection process underlying evolution, these fans have witnessed different forms of the martial arts reign during certain eras. Fighters like Royce Gracie, Randy Couture, Chuck Liddell, Wanderlei Silva, and Anderson Silva all dominated with strategies heavily focused in BJJ, Wrestling, Kickboxing, and Muay Thai.
Don’t look now, but Jackson and Silva share a similar pushup regimen. But while Jackson knocks them out to improve his strength for the end of fights, Silva includes them in his workouts for a different reason. “To push the guy,” he says. “To create space.” That created space could be crucial for when fighters get tangled up in the cage because that earned distance could be just enough real estate for Silva to throw a heavy blow or strike with his knees.
         UPDATE – “Jiu-Jitsu and MMA have had such a tremendous affect on my life in so many ways….I eat better…I don’t abuse my body…I treat people with more respect…and I have newfound appreciation of the world around me…..I used to have a kind of tough-guy complex…or so I have been told ….but my training at the Cove has been humbling in a sense that guys much smaller in stature and strength… can tap me out if I make a mistake and try to pour it on with just power and aggressiveness….thank you so much for the opportunities to improve myself and others at the Cove”

Fit to Fight®’s From The Ground Up™ is a groundfighting program designed to tackle the omnipresent self-protection dilemma of ending up on the ground during an altercation. It prioritizes the tools realistically required to get up from the ground during an affray when your attacker seeks to hold you there. From The Ground Up™ is a three-tiered program that bridges the gap between being told it is imperative “to get back up” and how to actually accomplish that in real time.
The amount of fighters that exist today versus 20 years ago is staggering. As the talent pool grows, it forces the athletes to improve or they risk being weeded out. The days of just being a tough bar brawler are gone. Today’s MMA champions are evolving into 24/7 athletes, like the NBA and NFL, where off season training, nutrition, and recovery are becoming vital to their success. Here are 9 tips that will get your training for MMA on track, helping you to perform at your maximum when fight day comes.

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Whenever you are squared off with a dangerous adversary and there is no way to safely escape the situation, you must strike first, strike fast, strike with authority, and keep the pressure on. This offensive strategy is essential to the process of neutralizing a formidable adversary when street fighting. A first strike is defined as the strategic application of proactive force designed to interrupt the initial stages of an assault before it becomes a self defense situation. 

Author Danny Indio has done a good job in the book of covering the 4 fighting ranges: Kicking Range, Punching Range, Trapping, and Grappling (both standing and ground). He covers stances and movement, upper body arm and hand strikes and defenses, lower body kicks and defenses, standing clinch fighting and defenses, leg takedowns and defenses, basic ground grappling positions and escapes, including ground strikes, arm bars and chokes plus defenses against each. There is some knife defense examples both standing and from the ground that I question a little, however, I concur with his principle of painfully damaging opponent first (striking attacker eyes, throat, groin, knee) before attempting disarm of the knife. See Table of Context for more subject matter details. Of course, there are volumes of books written about some of his individual topics in far more detail, however, overall I think he has written a comprehensive self- defense book. Besides it never hurts to go over the basics once in a while,

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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