“I’ve taken numerous martial arts (and benefited from all of them), but I’ve definitely learned the most from my experience in grappling that I’ve received at the Warrior’s Cove. I’ve always really appreciated the realism our school embraces. The people we tend to attract and who stay with the school, as well as the instructors are the most excellent people I’ve ever trained in martial arts with (double kudos to that end)… I’ve never felt really skilled at a physical activity until I found Gracie Jiu-Jitsu. It capitalizes on my strengths, and with time, I know it will make me a formidable fighter. You don’t have to be strong, fast, or big to become a formidable fighter; that is one of the first things you learn here. You learn how to overcome size, strength and blind aggression with technique. The realism of full-strength grappling (which can be done without the bruising caused by striking) wears you down at first, but you learn how to compensate technique for strength. Being less strong than your opponent becomes less intimidating, and full-strength grappling will feel pretty close to what a real self-defense situation will be like. Being a man of only modest build, I use to wonder what I’d be able to do to defend myself if someone stronger ever attacked me full-out. After near 6 months of training here, I know if I ever have to defend myself or my family from an attacker I will not worry about being tough enough.”
I enjoyed your views on this. I am a very strong 5’8″ female 170lbs I am a hell of a street fighter/boxer I would love to be more creative such as mma, problem where i live not alot options. Fighting has always been a goal of mine. I was very very fit after 2 kids I am trying get toned again. Training is very helpful again not alot options where I live currently. And yes I agree women love to see violence I don’t just enjoy watching. It’s a great learning skill for me. I was always told women can’t so anything,but I have proven over amd over again this isn’t true. Do you have any suggestion on home training without tons equipment that would be great for someone like me? And I see there is many ignorant people on this site. Haha 5 foot tall fighting a women my size and skill wouldn’t do no justice with why ever training she has it would be ignorant of her to raise her hand to anyone. I have fought men and I wouldn’t suggest she involve her self in suckle stupidity she could end up dead or hospital. I had my jaw broke by boxing with a very well trained built man girl walk away go anger management!
MMA is a complex sport that involves many different art forms. Fighters are forced to balance all aspects of their fight training, including boxing, Muay Thai, kickboxing, wrestling, jiu jitsu, drilling, technique, sparring and more. On top of this, they also need to fit some type of strength and conditioning plan, pay their bills, eat, sleep, and manage to squeeze in a personal life (family, friends, kids, etc).
MMA is a fighting style that requires more than one person to properly train. However, certain warm-ups and practices can be done alone to increase speed and accuracy of technique for fundamental movements, such as shadow boxing, using dummies or punching bags for grappling movements and striking, and practicing footwork. Another core element of MMA is cardio, so that you don't get tired out in the ring.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.
Pursuing an Ethnic Studies degree will give you insight into the experiences, triumphs, and struggles of minority and ethnic groups in America. They are heavy on history, with a very specific historical focus, analyzing how a particular group got to where it is now, in modern day America. It incorporates a study of the culture's growth and development, and its shifting relationship with the majority population and government. It examines cultural artifacts, such as art, music, and literature, and utilizes philosophy and critical theories.
Cornel West – West is a contemporary political philosopher who pays specific focus to racial issues in America. At various points in his career, he has been a professor of African-American studies at Princeton and Harvard. He is currently a professor of philosophy at Union Theological Seminary. West is featured in our article "The 50 Most Influential Philosophers."

If you prefer to work on a larger scale, a social work degree can allow you to manage and even found assistance programs for underprivileged populations that have been victimized by systemic racism. You could be a community organizer and work with the local government to help fund and promote assistance programs, and implement real change at the social level by helping people access the resources they need to get ahead and succeed in life.
“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
Whilst training and assessing I look at the load, technique, the number of repetitions, and the speed at which the weight is moved, which is very important. All of the above are always logged for the future information. For example, let’s say that Richie deadlifts 80% of his 1RM x 5, but the bar moves slowly. He struggles with the last 2 reps but manages to complete them with correct technique. I have made a note in his training log, “1x 5 @ 80% 1RM DL.” A couple of sessions later, he repeats exactly the same drill, but this time the bar moves quickly. He doesn’t struggle and there is no decrease in the speed at which he moves the bar. Does it mean he got stronger? Yes, but if I only make a note “[email protected]% 1RM DL” it doesn't tell me that there has been an improvement. I must also note the speed of the bar.
“When I moved to the United States from Russia in 1989, I had already trained in the martial arts for 17 years. I started looking for a school with a clean workout area, personalized training, high moral standards, qualified instructors and, most of all, quality people with which to train. However, during my search, I began to wonder if I would find a school I could belong to. Eventually, a friend told me about the Warrior’s Cove, and I agreed to go take a look. Twenty minutes into class I was on the edge of my seat trying to see every move and catch every concept! Needless to say, I was a proud member of the best school in the area by the end of the hour!”
Fit to Fight®’s Hard Ready™ is a unique course, that was designed to address THE single most important, and non-variable component to conflict: Emotional preparedness. Hard Ready™ is very much about addressing our own personal habits and modifying them in small, progressive ways to create a compounding effect concerning overall self-sovereignty. Ultimately, the ability to control ones emotions is the single most important variable in any situation. A strong connection is made between physical exertion, more specially interval training and the demands placed on human beings under heavy levels of stress. The classroom activities of the Hard Ready™ Program are designed to harden emotional resolve but also to address the emotional dynamic that pervades actual altercations. Pre-Emptive Striking is the foundation of the actual “fighting” part of the program, though “support system” lessons delve further into the physical anatomy of fighting. A great focus is also put on the most effective fighting systems including Wrestling, Boxing, Muay Thai and BJJ.
The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.
How is it that simulating a fight through shadow boxing can lead to more efficient, effective, and faster striking? Well, there is a ton of research on the benefits of deliberate practice for building fluency (i.e. performing automatically, quickly, and accurately) with any skill. Fluency results in relaxation. Relaxation results in effortless speed and power. Consider the 100-meter sprinter. He runs his best time when he’s running hard but relaxed. This relaxed exertion requires the fighter to find the right balance through practice to keep the tension out of his shoulders while directing his energy to strike at the opportune time. Relaxed exertion also positively impacts endurance-capabilities as it allows the fighter to be highly efficient in their striking.
“The lady came to me, bless her soul, because I said a few unchoice words to her. But with respect. She came to test me at 12 a.m. on Super Bowl weekend. Knowing the reason I was in Atlanta was probably for Super Bowl. And I had some appearances that I was supposed to be at. I had an event with [NFL player] Devonte Freeman and Meek Mill I was supposed to be at, an event with Ludacris and an event with Snoop Dogg. And I was in the hotel waiting on her to come in 45 minutes of traffic to test me. So, she tested me around 1 a.m. And I missed those events. So I asked her, ‘Why can’t you test me in the morning? I’m gonna be here.’ [She said,] ‘Oh let me call them and ask them if I can test you in the morning.’ They said, ’No, I gotta test you now.’ Why in the hell didn’t you test me earlier today? ‘Oh I had an event I had to go to.’ I have an event I have to go to that I’m missing money because I’m supposed to be there. She said, ‘Oh, I can meet you there.’ I said, ‘No, you can’t get in, you can’t get on the list.’ So I had to wait there and she had to test me at 1 a.m. And I was not happy.” h/t MMA Fighting
Boxers undergo some of the most intense training to prepare for just minutes in the ring. Sure, lifting weights and running endless miles will do the trick, but lets be real, nothing feels better than sweating it out like a true badass. Treadmills and stairmasters are child’s play in comparison to banging out a few rounds of speed rope or deadly one-two combinations.
It's not a traditional bodybuilding workout, but MMA fighting works all of the muscle groups in the body. For instance, hitting the heavy bag is equivalent to lifting weights. When your back is against the cage and you're working to get your opponent off you, that's equivalent to doing weighted squats and bench presses. You do training camps to prepare for fights, and that means sticking to your diet religiously and working out hard. It's not an easy lifestyle, but it keeps you fit.
I call it the “complex” inchworm because it’s really a combination of a few movements. Start with your feet together and bend from the waist as you reach your hands to the ground. Perform an ‘inchworm’ movement by walking your hands out until you are in a push-up position. From here, rock your body back slightly and jump your feet up to the outsides of your hands.  Sink your butt down as low as you comfortably can for a great groin stretch, and then raise one arm overhead as high as possible, trying to draw your arm back so that it is in line with your ear. Lift the other arm in the same fashion and stand up. Lower your arms and repeat the whole sequence for five to six complete repetitions.
Our instructors are professionals who are passionate about MMA Competition and training. They are some of the area’s best and most exciting fighters but most importantly they are excellent at conveying their knowledge to students.  Our reputation is built on great instruction, so we are very proud of the quality of classes and practices facilitated by our instructors.
I always recommend some sort of dynamic warm-up/movement prep before starting a strength-training workout. I use this exercise with the majority of my clients, regardless of their profession. My MMA athletes are typically tight in the upper back from the various positions in which they put their bodies. For the "desk jockey" who spends hours a day at a desk, tight upper-back muscles are also common, as sitting for long periods of time wreaks havoc on one’s posture. To help combat poor posture, you need to facilitate thoracic spine extension and rotation with movements like this one.
In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
This is not to say all companies are guilty of this, but to acknowledge that there is, and continues to be, an “old guard” in the professional world. Racism in the workplace often manifests itself in this way, through institutional racism. There are ways to fight institutional racism from the outside, such as through business regulations, legislation requiring fair hiring practices, and an array of legal resources, ethics boards, incident reporting procedures, and more. Still, fighting from the outside can only do so much.
Jeremy Pacatiw has represented the Philippines inside the Brave cage in Brazil, India, Morocco, and Pakistan, and is excited to be coming home, as the world's only truly global mixed martial arts organization lands in Manila: "I learned a lot in this sport. The discipline, attitude, mental toughness, humility. All of those things changed my life. It changed the way I view life and my way of life as well. Now I'm able to support myself, help my parents, buy my own things. I want to inspire others through sport. I want to show the youth that all things are possible. I feel like I need to be a good example for the next generation and I think that starts with respect. ... I always took my losses as a success, because I've learned a lot from them. They give me motivation, they're a stepping stone to my eventual success."
For Loughnane, who has lost just three fights due to "bad decision-making" in his decade-long career and regularly spars with Dominick "The Dominator" Cruz, variety of movement is crucial. "It can be anything from boxing or wrestling to ju jitsu," he says. "Predominantly now, because I'm more experienced and my technique is decent, I just need to try and get very fit for the fights.

Camron, thanks for the message. I would say that the number one priority would be skill development. Drilling, learning the technical aspects of striking and grappling. The S&C simply compliments the skill development, so 2-3 workouts per week is plenty. Stick to learning the basics of squatting, hinging, pushing, pulling and carrying heavy loads. Your success will come from lng term consistency, not short term intensity, so be patient, don’t overdo it and over time you will improve.
It's widely known that fights often end before their allotted time limit, either via a knockout (KO) or technical knockout (TKO) by strikes, or by submission (SUB). This differs from other sports such as hockey or basketball where the players are required to play the whole length of the game. In MMA, fighters have the unique ability to control how long the fight lasts. This has huge implications on training strategies as well as damage and concussion mitigation. A fighter could technically never train their conditioning and achieve all their MMA wins by first round knockout... But... we all know that strategy does NOT work against equally-skilled opponents; even the most brutal knockout artists can be taken into deep waters. Professional MMA fighters must have the appropriate amount of conditioning to last at a minimum, 15 minutes. Failing to do so will prevent you from competing at the highest level of the sport.
Just as different forms and aspects of striking – those from Boxing, Kickboxing, Muay Thai, traditional martial arts, etc. – each have unique advantages and disadvantages and need to be utilized appropriately in an MMA fight, there are also many different forms and effective applications of interval training. In this article, I’ll present you with four different methods of interval training that I’ve successfully used over the last seven years with more than thirty top pro fighters. Each interval method has a different purpose and application and I guarantee each can help improve the effectiveness of your training program.
A contemporary of Bruce Lee, Wing Chun practitioner Wong Shun Leung, gained prominence fighting in 60-100 illegal beimo fights against other Chinese martial artists of various styles. Wong also fought and won against Western fighters of other combat styles, such as his match against a Russian boxer named Giko,[28] his televised fight against a fencer,[29] and his well-documented fight against Taiwanese Kung-Fu master Wu Ming Jeet.[30] Wong combined boxing and kickboxing into his kung fu, as Bruce Lee did.
Mixed martial arts "no holds barred" reference would eventually come to an end with the implementation of specific safety rules and regulations. Despite resistance from politicians and safety regulations, mixed martial arts quickly grew in popularity around the world. Mixed martial arts is now big business! It is now estimated that mixed martial arts events are shown in over 130 countries worldwide. While there are other mixed martial arts promotional companies, non have achieved the incredible success of the UFC. 

The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.
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