At Easton, we know what it takes to be a fighter–from preparing for your first time in the ring to competing at the highest levels. If you have the dedication and determination, we can give you the skills to make you a contender. To get started on your MMA journey, come to Easton Training Centers, and train where the pros train. Sign up online, and you can get a free trial to experience the Easton difference. So book your first class now, and get ready to rule the Octagon!
Starting in the boxing stance, squat slightly and twist your body to the left while pivoting your right foot. As you turn, bring your right arm and fist up, toward your target. Then pull your elbow back and reassume the boxing stance. Next, throw a left uppercut: Keeping your knees slightly bent, pivot to the left with your right foot while twisting your body to the left. Then, keeping your weight forward, twist back to the right toward your target while bringing your left arm and fist up. Repeat the movements, alternating between them, for 30 seconds.
What is the makeup of a great MMA fighter? I will not be going into the technical mastery of various martial arts, but looking at it more from the strength and conditioning coach point of view. An MMA fighter has to be strong enough to dominate the opponent, throw powerful punches and kicks, absorb impact, and be able to resist a constant application of force. He or she has to be powerful and fast, and have enough endurance to be able to perform at high level for five 5-minute rounds. The training program has to address all of the above qualities without compromising one another. This is the beauty of strength and conditioning training for combat sports - as an S&C coach you are a part of a team that creates such a well-rounded athlete.
Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.
What seems to be more important is the sparing use of these high intensity intervals outside of MMA training. By the way of training periodization, and the principle of specificity, the majority of the high intensity intervals should be performed few weeks out before the fight. Performing a high volume of high intensity training year round hinders a fighter's ability to improve their skills and stay injury-free.
Most martial arts training areas are padded, well lit, and free of objects. Natural environments couldn't be more different! On the street you've got curbs, buildings with concrete corners and protruding edges, trees, cars, etc., etc. In rooms there is furniture everywhere. Self defense training must include training in these areas, along with the use of the environment. Learning to slam your opponent into objects and avoid getting slammed and tripping over objects is extremely important.
Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki took place in Japan in 1976. The classic match-up between professional boxer and professional wrestler turned sour as each fighter refused to engage in the other's style, and after a 15-round stalemate it was declared a draw. Muhammad Ali sustained a substantial amount of damage to his legs, as Antonio Inoki slide-kicked him continuously for the duration of the bout, causing him to be hospitalized for the next three days.[31] The fight played an important role in the history of mixed martial arts.[32] In Japan, the match inspired Inoki's students Masakatsu Funaki and Minoru Suzuki to found Pancrase in 1993, which in turn inspired the foundation of Pride Fighting Championships in 1997. Pride was acquired by its rival Ultimate Fighting Championship in 2007.[33][34]
In 1951, a high-profile mixed martial arts bout was Masahiko Kimura vs. Hélio Gracie, which was fought between judoka Masahiko Kimura and Brazilian jiu jitsu founder Hélio Gracie in Brazil. Kimura defeated Gracie using a gyaku-ude-garami armlock, which later became known as the "Kimura" in Brazilian jiu jitsu.[24] In 1963, a catch wrestler and judoka "Judo" Gene Lebell fought professional boxer Milo Savage in a no-holds-barred match. Lebell won by Harai Goshi to rear naked choke, leaving Savage unconscious. This was the first televised bout of mixed-style fighting in North America. The hometown crowd was so enraged that they began to boo and throw chairs at Lebell.[25]
Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
Mixed martial arts are extremely popular nowadays, but in actuality MMA has been around for a very long time. As a matter of fact, mixed martial arts date back to the Greco-Roman era where the ancient martial art Penetration appeared in the Olympic Games. Many historians agree that the mixed martial arts of ancient Greece and very similar to the mixed martial arts of modern day. However, mixed martial arts of today are considered to be one of the most regulated and controlled sports in the world.

Training methods that either create an adrenal response or mimic one will help a great deal in learning to operate in this state, and to show you what you can and can't do during one. While sport style training and competition can do this, there are particular drills, from scenario training to those that bring you to total exhaustion, that should be a part of self defense training.
Ross training shows you how to make sandbags, but I have an easier/cheaper way. Just buy a $10 exercise ball and fill it up with water. Submerge to pump, you'll figure it out. I filled mine halfway, about 60#s. You can do Tabata front squats or cleans. They're pretty killer. So much so that I stopped doing them. But maybe you'll have more mental fortitue than I.

Train for cardio first, then power, then strength, then mix in some stamina. Your best and most effective workouts will combine all four. The great thing about programming your workouts is you can get creative and have fun doing it. There is an endless mixture of exercises, routines, reps, and time limits, that can produce incredible fitness. If you think that running, or rowing are the only ways to build up your cardio, then you need to read on and find out how you can get very creative with your exercises. How about punching a bag 4 times, then doing a sprawl and standing up and doing, two kicks on the bag, then doing a backdrop, then do 5 squat jumps, 5 push ups, and repeat those movements as quickly as you can for 9 minutes, then rest for a minute and repeat for another nine minutes. You have just combined unbelievable cardio, with power, and strength, with stamina all in one workout. Combining all of the characteristics of fitness is the best way to train. For instance doing a 5K run is great for your stamina and cardio, but it does little for your strength or power. Doing max deadlifts doesn’t do much for your cardio or stamina, but it is great for your strength, Learn how to mix and match your workouts and you will get the best results, and have the most fun doing them… PS any strength or power movement done with reps that get your heart rate up, and your breathing labored, becomes cardio.
One misconception about energy systems is that each energy system completely turns on or off during various intensities and durations of exercise. Instead, all three energy systems contribute to energy production during all modalities and intensities of exercise. The relative contributions of each will depend on the velocity and force demands of the exercise bout or sport.

Drop the white knight routine and face facts. Women on average a weaker/smaller than men. If a woman is going to be traveling down the street, it’s in her best interest to carry some form of protection in case some punk wants to mug/rape/kidnap her. Nothing sexist about it. It’s the facts of life. Hell, I’ve been studying martial arts for 15 years and I still carry something, be it a tactical flashlight/knife/keys between the fingers, to give me an edge over a thug who wants to start trouble.
Submission-Seeking is a reference to the strategy of taking an opponent to the ground using a takedown or throw and then applying a submission hold, forcing the opponent to submit. While grapplers will often work to attain dominant position, some may be more comfortable fighting from other positions. If a grappler finds themselves unable to force a takedown, they may resort to pulling guard, whereby they physically pull their opponent into a dominant position on the ground.[137]
“To me the Warriors Cove is much more than a martial arts school.  I came to the Warriors Cove 4 years ago.  I was very out of shape and weak.  I struggled at first against bigger and stronger opponents.  But I fell in love with the game, and stuck with it.  MMA, for me is the only physical activity that has ever been able to hold my interest.  I know if it wasn’t for finding the Warriors Cove, I would still be weak and out of shape.”

Do a strength training workout three or four days a week. Weight training using free weights or specialized machines at the gym are good choices. Alternate between your upper and lower body each time you work out. You want to push yourself by lifting the heaviest possible weights, but you don't want to hurt yourself or become sore. Lessen the amount of weights or number of repetitions if you need to.
In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]
Try high-intensity circuit training (HICT). Because much of MMA involves moving quickly and with discipline, HICT can improve your fighting speed while strengthening your muscles. Circuit training involves doing a pattern of exercises in rapid succession for a set number of intervals. You might, for example, include any of the following workouts in your circuit:[3]
With a degree in history you can research and write, you can teach and spread your knowledge, raising awareness and giving your students the historical foundation they need to recognize and fight racism. You can pursue a degree in law or enter politics. You can use your knowledge in many facets of life to be mindful and spread awareness through words and actions.
It's not a traditional bodybuilding workout, but MMA fighting works all of the muscle groups in the body. For instance, hitting the heavy bag is equivalent to lifting weights. When your back is against the cage and you're working to get your opponent off you, that's equivalent to doing weighted squats and bench presses. You do training camps to prepare for fights, and that means sticking to your diet religiously and working out hard. It's not an easy lifestyle, but it keeps you fit.
Studying and writing fiction, non-fiction, and poetry gives us insight into issues and situations that we may not otherwise be able to understand. Literature gives us a deep, direct connection to the human soul, and can move us in ways that other mediums cannot. Studying rhetoric lets us understand the deeper implications of the language that is being used all around us, dictating how we represent ourselves, each other, and the issues that matter most to us.
^ Study of Fighters Shows Brain Changes Are Seen Before Symptoms, The New York Times, TIMOTHY PRATT, April 24, 2012. ' . . This is part of the Professional Fighters Brain Health Study, now a year old . . . . Dr. Bernick will present these findings on Wednesday in New Orleans at the American Academy of Neurology's annual meeting . . . . Though Dr. Bernick intends to continue his study of boxers for at least five years, he said the preliminary findings were worth the attention of the neurology association's annual meeting, as "nobody has the numbers we do." . . '
Learning how to street fight with the skill and confidence of a sesoned fighter is something that can certainly be achieved. As a matter of fact, I have dedicated my entire live to teaching law abiding people how to defend and protect themselves in the streets. However, I have to tell you from the start that it's not such and easy task; it will require a bit of dedication on your part. But, if you are willing to do some serious studying as well as some practical self-defense training you could learn the skills necessary to win a street fight. 
×