In addition to unarmed training, self defense must include training in the use of and defense against weapons. See our weapons page for more detailed information. These days it's likely a real predator will have a weapon. Training to defend against blunt, sharp, and projectile weapons is essential. And because the use of weapons can give you a major advantage, learning to use weapons (including objects found in your environment) should not be neglected.
Telegraphing is another thing to keep in mind when using your street fighting techniques. Essentially, telegraphing means unintentionally making your intentions known to your assailant during the fight. There are many subtle forms of telegraphing which must be avoided in when street fighting. Here are just a few: (1) Cocking your arm back prior to punching or striking; (2) Tensing your neck, shoulders or arms prior to striking; (3) Widening your eyes or raising your eyebrows; (4) Shifting your shoulders; (5) Grinning or opening your mouth; (6) Taking a sudden and deep breath. You can find more information about Telegraphing in many of my Instructional Street Fighting DVDS.

You’ll also get a taste of their main expertise, MMA and kickboxing, in the MATRX class—a cutting edge routine that incorporates TRX suspension. TRX increases your movement capacity and engages your muscle fibers in a way free weights and machines can’t because it utilizes your own bodyweight from various angles. Your stability, flexibility and endurance are strengthened—and most of all, your mind is engaged.
Loughnane agrees that this is vital: "Yoga should be a massive part of training. With how hard we train and how beaten up our bodies get over the years, in later life especially you need to work on flexibility," he says.  "Your muscles get really tight from wrestling and boxing, and it can get quite hard sometimes just getting out of bed in the mornings."
If you have time, complete two to three sets of push-ups, doing as many as you can for each set while maintaining good form, then finish your workout with a series of ab exercises, including planks, sit-ups, medicine ball oblique twists, and leg lifts. This is a great opportunity to really target the chest and abs. Adding just 5- to 10-minutes is a great way to finish things out.

NSAC chairman Anthony A. Marnell III: “We will be releasing the Jon Jones tests, but we will not do that until sometime very, very close to the night of the fight. So if you could stop requesting that data from the executive director, it would be helpful because it’s not going to come out until we’re ready to send it out and have all of that properly put together – but it will be published before the fight.” h/t MMAjunkie


“The physical benefits, which are great, for me pale in comparison to the great mental & emotional benefits I have received in the 4 years since I started training at the Warriors Cove.  I am much more confident in myself.  I have a greater sense of peace.  My mind feels much sharper, and I am a much happier person now.  I generally feel much more capable of dealing with whatever life throws at me. My day to day anxiety level is also much less.  I couldn’t imagine my life without the Warriors Cove, and I am eternally grateful that Mr. Arnebeck started this school.”
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
And most importantly, exactly what to do, how to do it, and when – choose between an 8, 12 and 16 week training template to follow that outlines everything including: intervals, cardio, bodyweight circuits, medicine ball training, weight training, core, NRG System Complexes and more, with exact reps, sets, rest periods and every detail you need to reach your physical potential
Unlike other self defense systems, Contemporary Fighting Arts recognizes the distinction between conventional and extreme street fighting situations and I have designed three unique street fighting programs that will give you the knowledge, skill and power to survive a life and death combat situation. These programs include: The Widowmaker Program, Feral Fighting Street Combat and Savage Street Fighting. Click on the links below to learn more about these state-of-the art fighting methods.
Fluency is the name of the game. Fighters do not have time to think. They clearly must react quickly and accurately if they are to be effective. While receiving regular feedback from coaches is important (especially during the acquisition of new skills), shadow-boxing does not regularly require coaches, rings, or even a partner to engage in this practice. The most important return on investment these training practices afford the striker are that they: (1) provide high reps which allow for automaticity (habit), and (2) they provide functional conditioning which allows for effortless, fast, and powerful strikes. Regardless of how technically sound a striker is, if he or she isn’t properly conditioned in the specific skill, the technique will suffer.
The United MileagePlus program is best for travelers based in major American cities and those who travel to destinations in Europe, the Middle East, Australia, Latin America and Asia. When you become a MileagePlus member, you can earn and use miles on United and its 35-plus airline partners like Singapore Airlines, ANA and Copa Airlines, many of which are part of the Star Alliance network. As a MileagePlus member, you'll accrue Premier Qualifying Miles (PQMs), Premier Qualifying Segments (PQSs) and Premier Qualifying Dollars (PQDs) each time you fly. Earn enough PQDs and PQMs or PQSs and you'll reach Premier status – MileagePlus membership levels for which you'll receive extra benefits. Additionally, you can earn miles on qualifying cruise vacations, car rentals and train fares, as well as on shopping, dining and other services. You can also earn miles for gas purchases at participating BP locations in the U.S. And since United partners with major hotel brands, including Marriott, Hyatt and IHG, you can earn rewards when you stay at properties worldwide. You may also redeem miles for flights, hotel stays, cruises, magazine subscriptions, destination experiences (think: sporting events and theater performances) and more.  Choose to use one of four United MileagePlus credit cards from Chase Visa and you'll earn miles on flights and everyday purchases.

In the U.S., state athletic and boxing commissions have played a crucial role in the introduction of additional rules because they oversee MMA in a similar fashion to boxing. In Japan and most of Europe, there is no regulating authority over competitions, so these organizations have greater freedom in rule development and event structure.[citation needed]


The mid-19th century saw the prominence of the new sport savate in the combat sports circle. French savate fighters wanted to test their techniques against the traditional combat styles of its time. In 1852, a contest was held in France between French savateurs and English bare-knuckle boxers in which French fighter Rambaud alias la Resistance fought English fighter Dickinson and won using his kicks. However, the English team still won the four other match-ups during the contest.[16] Contests occurred in the late 19th to mid-20th century between French Savateurs and other combat styles. Examples include a 1905 fight between French savateur George Dubois and a judo practitioner Re-nierand which resulted in the latter winning by submission, as well as the highly publicized 1957 fight between French savateur and professional boxer Jacques Cayron and a young Japanese karateka named Mochizuki Hiroo which ended when Cayron knocked Hiroo out with a hook.[16]
“The atmosphere inside the Cove is truly special. Everyone trains with the safety of their partner in mind. Senior members are always willing to help newer students learn technique. The code of conduct is simple, graceful and never dramatized. My experience around Mr. Arnebeck has taught me that he is generous and easygoing, but also very skilled in the martial arts and gifted in their teaching. I am daily impressed with the passion he has for his life’s work. I feel very fortunate to have this incredible place near enough to me to allow my training and I look forward to each class I attend.”

Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.

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In general, the injury pattern in MMA is very similar to that in professional boxing but unlike that found in other combat sports such as judo and taekwondo.[170] The most commonly injured body region is the head (66.8% to 78.0% of reported injuries) followed by the wrist/hand (6.0% to 12.0% of reported injuries), while the most frequent types of injury were laceration (36.7% to 59.4% of reported injuries), fracture (7.4% to 43.3% of reported injuries), and concussion (3.8% to 20.4% of reported injuries).[170] The frequency of impact to the ear and low utilization of ear protection leads to a high frequency of perichondral hematoma that can lead to cauliflower ear.[178]

Well, as they say, “times are a changin’!” After Maurice Smith demonstrated that strikers can be effective in MMA through a sprawl and brawl technique, boxing techniques have slowly crept back into the sport and are now being applied effectively by fighters like Jorge Masvidal, Cody Garbrandt, Nate Diaz, and Junior dos Santos to name a few. To be clear, these athletes are mixed martial artists. Pure boxers would understandably not fare well in MMA; however, recent stellar performances by Masvidal and Garbrandt hammered home how key aspects of boxing can be applied to MMA to beat top-flight fighters. These aspects include use of range and angles, relaxed punching, head movement, footwork, body punching, and consistent use of the jab to set up power punches.


OK, so while round one will help you with your explosive conditioning and ability to recover fast, in this round we’re going to the ground, which is where a lot of MMA fighter’s spend a good amount of time. The Turkish Get Up is an amazing drill for stability, learning to create tension in the body and building static strength. It was a staple drill in the Turkish wrestling world back in the day. This is a very old school drill that is having it’s renaissance right now and for very good reason, it’s an amazing, basic, fundamental movement pattern.
Marsden also adds that this type of bodyweight circuit is inherently flexible, so feel free to mix up the exercises as you wish. He just has one word of caution: "Feel free to change up the movements, but be cognizant of varying the exercises to maximize heart rate changes," he says. "By this I mean don't do three high-intensity movements before ending with two rounds of lower-intensity planks and flutter kicks." Rather, switch back and forth between higher- and lower-intensity exercises when planning your bodyweight circuit.
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