Ruth McRoy – McRoy holds the title of Endowed Professorship at the Boston College School of Social work, and is a co-founding Director of Research and Innovations in Social, Economic, and Environmental Equity (RISE) at Boston College. She is widely published and has been an educator of social work for over three decades. Her work focuses on race and family services, such as disproportionality in welfare, and adoption.

Muay Thai, a form of martial arts that includes boxing, Muay Boran and kickboxing, is also an important training element. Muay Boran is the ancient art that evolved into modern Muay Thai, with an emphasis on hand-to-hand combat. You will need to learn punching techniques, elbow techniques, kicking skills, as well as knee strikes and foot thrusts. One of the advantages of Muay Thai is that it is fairly simple and straightforward and fairly easy to incorporate into your fights.

The idea might sound insane to some people: You’re going to pay money so you can go to a place every couple of days and get beat up. But, joining up to study a martial art can be extremely rewarding for your fitness and your overall well being. Picking the right system to study is crucial if you’re going to enjoy yourself and, ultimately, stick with it. Here’s a quick guide to help you figure out which one is right for you. And this list is just a start. There are plenty of other areas of study out there to explore, but these seven are likely the easiest to find.


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Using a completely scientific approach to weight training progression, a cycle will be designed to meet your needs. For example, a Hypertrophy phase will increase cross sectional area of the muscle. A Maximum Strength phase will increase recruitment and strength of the muscle. The Power Transfer phase will help those who wish to increase the pure speed of their actions and the Competition phase to increase your strength, power, size, and speed throughout your “in-season”.

One of the most important aspects of mixed martial arts training is cardio-vascular training for stamina.  As fighters bounce around the ring like boxers, engage in grappling and wrestle to the ground, the necessity for premier conditioning is obvious. Boxers go 12 rounds so cardio is more important than strength. When two fighters are engaged, or grappling each other for a dominant position the constant use of their muscles leads to extreme fatigue. As a result MMA fighters spend lots of time on cardio. Many of the same cardio exercises that are used for boxing are used by MMA fighters.  This includes the basics like jogging and jumping rope, to biking, swimming and pretty much any other kind of fitness machine you would find in your local gym.
MMA, or mixed martial arts, is a relatively new combat sport that was brought to public attention with the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship in 1993. It brought the Brazilian concept of Vale Tudo fighting, or anything goes, no-holds barred fighting, to worldwide attention, throwing fighters from different styles against each other. While Brazilian submission specialist Royce Gracie won the first tournament with ease, today's fighters are much more well-rounded.
This info will really help me pace myself. People who want to fight are already fighting something mentally. That’s why I think it’s hard to slow down and focus. It’s so easy to over train and not eat or sleep enough. All I did was obsess over calesthenics, shadow boxing, and mit work for 2 years, trying to avoid the trouble in my life. I started going to 2 sister MMA gyms in south Houston a year ago, and I’m just now at the point where jiu jitsu is helping me relax. I struggle through life as a rule. I think jiu jitsu is what will break me of that. I wanna be like Rickson Gracie. You know, at peace. Some day when I’m 90 I’ll still be doing jiu jitsu.
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