Pride is Fit to Fight®’s exclusive kids training program. This program provides an enriching, safe and unique martial arts experience designed solely for children. Pride offers kids an exciting and varied curriculum, exposing kids to Muay Thai, Brazilian Jiu-jitsu, Krav Maga, sports conditioning and more! This program allows kids to be well-rounded martial artists and community members. Pride is based on the coming together of the emotional and physical needs that are actually manifest in the lives of our children today as opposed to watered down promises often mistakenly associated with Traditional Martial Arts, that are so rarely delivered.

For Regular Dudes: Try new things: basic, intelligent training that's tailored to your specific needs – not some celebrity's. That's the smartest option. "I give seminars all over the world, and I always ask the room who has flexibility issues," says Rooney. "Virtually everyone will raise their hand. Next, I ask whoever's working on it (flexibility) to keep your hands up. Maybe one or two are."


The integration phase is where a technique is integrated into "unlimited", live, random training. In the previous isolation phase techniques are practiced in limited sparring, so a practitioner should already understand and be able to apply techniques in a live situation. The primary difference between the isolation and integration phase is that in the integration phase all techniques and ranges are allowed.
They say that boxing is dead and MMA is holding the smoking gun pointed towards it. While the “sweet science of pugilism” has certainly seen better days and it’s cage fighting brother sport has made major strides in the last decade, boxing is far from gone and certainly not forgotten. And it has had a boost in popularity due to a new organization, BKB, in which the fighters have to be in top shape due to the size – or lack thereof – of the fighting arena.
I hope you get my point. The truth is mixed martial arts have numerous technical and tactical deficiencies for real world self defense applications. To avoid beating a dead horse and being redundant I won't list them here but you can read my submission fighting article and see exactly what I am talking about. Don't get me wrong, I have a tremendous amount of respect for mixed martial arts fighters. They are some of the best conditioned athletes in the world and their sport requires a tremendous amount of discipline and hard work. But the truth is, surviving a criminal assault in the streets requires a completely different form of training and mind set. The bottom line is, mixed martial arts will never be reality based self defense!
Taking the time to set goals and make a plan is one thing. Applying it, walking it out, and making it happen is another beast. Life will always throw challenges your way. Make sure to take the time to assess “why” you are training so hard, otherwise, little distractions will knock you off course. It may be easy to stay focused if you have a fight schedule, but how consistent are you with nothing set? 

Freeze – never end up here… when you are so shocked that you don’t know how to react…. imagine some 6’9″ 300 lbs muscled up bad dude yelling at your face in threatening manner or like standing few inches away from grizzly bear (assuming the bear is behind the zoo cage) but still… your brain will be filled with rush, fear, anxiety, freeze, etc… understand yourself… understand what you are fearful of, why and ways to conquer that. 

The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
Wushu Sanshou and other Chinese martial arts have also been utilized in MMA. They can be highly effective in competition due to their mixture of striking and takedowns, achieved through a condensation of traditional Chinese martial arts techniques. Most prominent and chief amongst these fighters is Cung Le, who is most notable for his TKO and KO victories over former UFC champions Frank Shamrock (in Strikeforce) and Rich Franklin (at UFC Macau). Other Wushu Sanshou based fighters who have entered MMA include KJ Noons, Pat Barry, Zhang Tiequan[120], Muslim Salihov[121] and Zabit Magomedsharipov.[122]

Also, keep in mind, we want to do this as a conditioning routine. This is a way to get into fighting shape, but not prepare for a fight. This routine, may or may not be good for an MMA fighter, honestly, I don’t know because I’m not one! What I do know is the following workout(s) are my answer to my own question, how do you develop the conditioning to go 25 minutes in the octagon?  So we develop and we progress.  Start with 3 minute rounds and we’ll work up to the 5.
If you’ve been working out for any length of time, it’s a safe bet that you’ve used interval training as a part of your conditioning and/or overall fitness regimen. Countless articles have been written over the last several years touting the benefits that can be seen with their use – many citing supporting various pieces of research to back up their claims.
The training has been going great and your athlete is responding well to the sessions. All is going according to the plan. Then one day, the day you have planned a heavy session, the fighter comes in completely battered and says he just did a heavy sparring session, as he had to help his friend, who is getting ready for a fight. How many times has a similar scenario happened to you? Would you even consider sticking to your program on such a day? The answer is that you have to adapt. Sometimes the fighters come to you and their bodies are completely broken. Your job is to build them back up, not to exhaust them even more. You still need to remember about your goal, however. So whatever you do on the day has to contribute to the goal itself. 
Sambo is a Russian martial art, combat sport and self-defense system.[119] It is a mixture of Judo and Freestyle Wrestling using a Keikogi known as Kurtka. Sambo focuses on throwing, takedowns, grappling, and includes submissions from Judo and Catch Wrestling. Sambo also has a modality known as Combat Sambo, which adds punches, kicks, elbows and knees, making it a proto-MMA hybrid fighting style. Sambo is popular in Russia and eastern Europe, where it is taught as a complement to Judo and Wrestling training, Sambo also provides a good base for MMA with all-around skills for combining grappling and striking. Some notable Sambo fighters that transitioned into MMA include: Fedor Emelianenko, Igor Vovchanchyn, Oleg Taktarov and Khabib Nurmagomedov.
Is that even possible for the average guy or gal? I say yes!  Wait a second…. What’s that you say? You only have a couple Kettlebells and your back yard? You don’t own a heavy bag nor do you have access to an octagon. Well, guess what? Today is your lucky day! I’ve devised a UFC / MMA “inspired” Workout for members of Rich Man’s Gym and it’s progressive, which means you can incorporate this into almost any fitness level.
Wedge one end of a barbell into the corner of a room (the edge of a bench can also be used). You may want to wrap the end of the bar in a towel to prevent slipping or damage to the walls. Place a light weight-plate on the other end of the bar, and grab the bar with your right hand near the edge. Get into a fighting stance, left foot forward (or right foot, if you’re a southpaw) and knees bent. Now bend both your knees and transfer your weight onto your back leg, as if you were crouching down before a jump [1].

What to expect: There’s a lot of visualization to be done when it comes to Wing Chun. In order to keep the body in balance, it teaches the idea of a center line in the body, which guides every action. The attacks consist mostly of rapid strikes performed while moving forward, into the opponent. The stance is also different from other martial arts, so be prepared to be sore in odd places.
Before I show you any actual fighting techniques, you need a posture or stance that will maximize your offensive techniques and provide defensive protection. In my Contemporary Fighting Arts, I teach my students a broad scope of strategic stances that protect your center line during a street fight. But for purposes of this how to article, I will only address the fighting stance. But, in order to better appreciate the fighting stance you should have a basic understanding of the center line theory. Basically, the center line is an imaginary vertical line that divides your body in half. Located on this line are some of your most vital anatomical targets that you must protect in a street fight. These targets include the eyes, nose, chin, throat, solar plexus and groin. Your center line is best protected by using a fighting stance that strategically position your targets away from direct hits.
In my instructional Street Fighting DVD, Armed to the Teeth: Mastering Upper Body Weapons, I discuss that one essential part of learning how to street fight is knowing and understanding it from a purely academic perspective. That's right. Reading books and studying instructional self-defense DVDs will certainly help you and its an important part of the learning curve that is often overlooked by many people. If you take the time to study street fighting like a science you will be way ahead of your opponent. And that's what it's all about - gaining the advantage over your adversary so you can prevail and get home alive in one piece!

Since repetition is critical to gaining proficiency in any skill, shadow boxing is a pivotal training technique because it provide fighters the opportunity to unlimited repetitions with little physical wear-and-tear. But please note that it’s not just any reps, these should be high-quality reps with deliberate focus on specific skills and strategies. A key strategy is to film the sessions and make corrections to form and enhance or provide more complexities to the shadow boxing as the skill progresses. Bruce Lee summed this up perfectly when he said, “I fear not the man who has practiced 10,000 kicks once, but I fear the man who has practiced one kick 10,000 times.” Great MMA boxers like Masvidal engage in quality reps along with other aspects of training that include good coaching and sparring. Shadow boxing is a time-tested, essential tool for building striking efficiency and effectiveness.

Social workers can fight racism by helping affected populations at the individual and community levels. At the individual level, social workers can work on a case-by-case basis, with varying specializations, helping clients get what they need. Maybe you want to work with underprivileged and at-risk youth, helping them stay in school and get involved with extracurricular programs, apply for scholarships, or get vocational training. You could work for an agency, or at a school, or at a residential treatment facility as a counselor or a therapist, helping children and teenagers get access to resources they need, work through trauma, deal with mental health issues, and more.
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