MMA is a raw sport that is evolving into an incredible chess match of mind, body, and will. It is sport and competition in its purest form. It is exciting to watch the sport evolve and is rewarding to help young athletes chase and achieve their dreams. I truly hope that this information helps you get more out of your training and enables you to perform at a higher level.

Gerard Marrone knows a thing or two about getting in shape from a deficit. After being shot at age 21 while defending his sister, he battled back from being paralyzed to boxing again. “I still have a bullet in my body,” he says. “If I can get in shape, anyone can.” What follows is the three-part plan Marrone follows when he needs to get in fighting shape — and quickly.


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Especially used by fighters with strong wrestling background when facing a highly skilled grappler, or by wrestlers who prefer stand-up fights. Usually fighters who adopt this strategy use takedowns only for scoring, allowing the adversary to stand up and continue the fight. They also want to land clear strikes and control the octagon. In order to win the fight by decision all score oriented fighters have to have strong defensive techniques and avoid takedowns.[139]
How to: Begin in a standing position with feet shoulder-width apart. Lower down into a squat and place your palms on the ground so that the elbows are positioned just inside the knees. Kick your feet back into a plank, then lower the hips and arch your back, so your body resembles a more active cobra pose. Reverse the exercise, jump the feet forward, and explode back up to the starting position.

Stress (training, workouts, etc) breaks the body down. You become stronger and build back up during times of rest. Taking time off is vital for your body and mind! Being fresh and prepared for one workout a day is more beneficial than forcing three and not retaining anything and performing like crap. Take a day or two off every week and at least one week off after a fight.


Alex Edmonds, PhD, BCB, is currently an associate professor of research at Nova Southeastern University in Davie, Florida. He graduated from Florida State University and received his doctoral degree in Educational Psychology with a minor in Statistics and Measurement. Over the years, Dr. Edmonds has applied his knowledge of research design, measurement and assessment in both field and laboratory examinations. He has published extensively in a variety of areas such as research design, psychophysiology and sport psychology. Prior to graduate school, he was a strength and conditioning coach working with professional athletes in football, track, and boxing. He then combined his passion for the sports with the field of psychology making it the emphasis of his graduate work. While in graduate school, he conducted his field work with the track and field team at Florida State and started using biofeedback for research and practice during this time. He has utilized biofeedback extensively with various types of athletes for performance enhancement, as well as stress-regulation techniques. Dr. Edmonds is certified through the Biofeedback Certification International Alliance in general biofeedback.
Crank up your cardio with interval training. Cardiovascular strength is extremely important for fighters who must be able to maintain explosive, aerobic strength for the duration of each round. Improve your stamina for fights by doing short sprints between recovery runs instead of a long, steady-state session. You can apply this principle to any form of cardiovascular training. Try to include at least one 20 to 30-minute interval workout each week.
Thanks for the great article corey, im Pro MMA Fighter from Indonesia. This is really inspired me. If you dont mind i want to ask a question. If we see many MMA training camp ,they split grappling roll ,wrestle and striking spar in different days. but in your schedule example, it’s only need twice a week for spar etc. My question is ,are we have enough spar/roll/wrestle to keep us sharp, for only twice a week? Thanks for your time man, hope can train and roll with you someday.
MMA fighters do a high volume of work every week. Drilling, sparring, mitts, bag work, and other aspects are intense and they are all taxing on the body. If you are going to add a strength and conditioning plan on top of that volume of work, it has to be well thought out and compliment an existing plan. Way too many trainers, athletes, and coaches create programs from scratch, hearsay, YouTube videos, or past experience. Their main goal is simply to work hard, without taking other aspects of the fighters’ training or life into consideration. John Hinds said, “Any trainer can crush you, but only the good ones can heal you as well.”

Steve Bosse and Sean O’Connell may not be champions or top contenders, but there will always be a place for fighters like this in the Octagon, simply because when the cage door closes, they leave nothing up to chance. Their fists and feet – primarily their fists – are how they do their job, and if throwing them for 15 minutes at an opponent is the way to get that job done, they’re going to do it. This was classic brawling won by Bosse, but there were no losers here.
Oh really? I know several females who have taken on males in our gym, and the sport is not manly it is EMPOWERING. Get in the cage with a real female fighter maybe like Ronda, or Holly. See how you do then. As an MMA fighter it is surprising how ignorant you are, most fighters have open minds, and believe we are ALL ONE. TRUE FIGHTERS AT HEART. Which you are not, obviously.

This is just one example of how to lay out your week.  There are many schools of thought and a lot of ways to mix up your schedule.  The main thing to consider is how each session taxes your body.  Wrestling, rolling live or sparring take their toll on your system and should be done sparingly throughout the week.  Our bodies need time to recover between these intense sessions.  That being said, we can spend that time learning new techniques, drilling and improving our skill between these sessions.
Every class has a “go at your own pace” conditioning and warm up phase at the beginning of each class, where you can choose to push yourself to your limits (or take it easy if need be)! Then we go over fighting techniques for 45 minutes. This is followed by our optional Open Gym Training where you tailor your own workout as you wish. The instructors are always available to help you if you have any questions!
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If the only boxing you’ve done involved a crate of oranges, you may want to look for a takedown in a fight-wrestling an opponent off his feet and onto the floor so he can’t hit you. “Some guys can get to the legs, but they lack the power to pick an opponent up off his feet to finish the takedown,” says Zach Even-Esh, a strength coach to MMA athletes in Edison, NJ. “To improve speed and strength, try the barbell burpee power clean.”
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