“I began training at the Warrior’s Cove after being introduced to the Army Combatives Program while preparing for a deployment to Iraq. I found the instruction at the Cove to be much more technical and in-depth that what the army could provide. My initial goal was to begin competing in grappling tournaments, which I was able to do after about a year of training. I was not very interested in the striking aspect at first, since I thought actual sparring and competing in mixed martial arts would be too intense for me. However, since Mr. Arnebeck incorporates complete striking and mixed martial arts training with the jiu-jitsu program, I was able to learn them both at the same time in an effective manner without feeling out of my comfort zone. Soon I felt that I would be comfortable competing in mixed martial arts, so I took my first professional fight after 2 years of training at the Cove and I have not stopped competing and training since. I am currently an assistant instructor at the Warrior’s Cove and I enjoy being able to share the knowledge I have acquired over the past 4 years with people who are as excited to train and to learn as I am. Thank you Mr. Arnebeck and all of the great training partners at the Warrior’s Cove!”
wocyru01.. its pain that I get in the shins.. about 1 inch above and 1 inch in front of the ankle bone... i had it in the past which started at 6 months after running 5 miles everyday. Ive been ok the past 3 weeks, until last night... my shin started hurting and I had to stop running and instead use the bike. my reasearch indicates its either overtraining.. or bad form.. my guess is its the latter as it takes time to develope.. comments??

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
Since ancient times, wrestling has been a training tool for fighters and soldiers alike (it was a core of Spartan warrior training, as well as a base for the ancient MMA art of Pankration). Today, wrestlers consistently demonstrate that their style is a fundamental part of modern MMA combat. Solid stand-up grappling allows a fighter to determine where the fight takes place, giving a significant advantage. In the past, BJJ practitioners often suffered from poor takedown games. This is something we aim to correct at Radical MMA NYC: we have dedicated takedown classes, and in our Combat Judo/ Jiu-jitsu classes we also put a premium on learning takedown skills, takedown defense, and MMA oriented Judo throws.
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20]
MMA, or mixed martial arts, is a relatively new combat sport that was brought to public attention with the advent of the Ultimate Fighting Championship in 1993. It brought the Brazilian concept of Vale Tudo fighting, or anything goes, no-holds barred fighting, to worldwide attention, throwing fighters from different styles against each other. While Brazilian submission specialist Royce Gracie won the first tournament with ease, today's fighters are much more well-rounded.
To begin, lie on your side and draw your top knee up to 90 degrees using a foam roller or medicine ball. Bring your hands together out in front of you and begin the movement by turning your top hand over and sliding it along the ground, up and over your head. The goal is to keep the back of the hand as close to the ground as possible throughout the entire movement. Once you reach your butt, reverse the movement and slide your hand back around the head to the starting position. Perform eight to 10 circles per side.
^ "Source: UFC buys Pride for less than $70M". Associated Press, ESPN. March 27, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-15. "This is really going to change the face of MMA. Literally creating a sport that could be as big around the world as soccer. I liken it somewhat to when the NFC and AFC came together to create the NFL" —Lorenzo Fertitta, one of the UFC's majority owners 

^ Kittipong Thongsombat (2012-03-31). "Thailand bans mixed martial arts". Bangkok Post. p. S6. SAT officials met this week to discuss whether holding an MMA event was lawful or not following a request from a private company and they finally agreed that under the 1999 boxing law, it is unlawful to stage an MMA event in Thailand. "Organising a MMA event here would hurt the image of Muay Thai," Sakol Wannapong said.
Don’t look now, but Jackson and Silva share a similar pushup regimen. But while Jackson knocks them out to improve his strength for the end of fights, Silva includes them in his workouts for a different reason. “To push the guy,” he says. “To create space.” That created space could be crucial for when fighters get tangled up in the cage because that earned distance could be just enough real estate for Silva to throw a heavy blow or strike with his knees.
How to: Start off on all fours. Lift your knees off the floor and raise your hips slightly, bracing your core as you do so. That’s the “bear” position! Keeping your shoulders and hips at the same height, step forward with your right foot while reaching forward with your right hand. Repeat on the left side and continue moving forward, building speed as you go. Roaring is optional.

How to: They’re often performed on basketball courts, but these sprints can be done anywhere. Set up six markers, each one six yards apart. Sprint from the first line to the second and touch the line with your hand. Run back and touch the first line, then immediately sprint to the third. Back to the first, then to the fourth. Continue and repeat until you can’t.


My experience at Warrior’s Cove has been profound. After three and one half years of training, the effects on my life are obvious. My fitness level has increased dramatically. I am much more flexible, have better endurance and health of the cardiovascular system. I also have better posture and have seen great improvements in balance. The most powerful change has been in my mind. The focus that I have acquired through the repetition of movements and the will to improve has been a potent ingredient in my growth. I am able to concentrate and relax under difficult circumstances. This is a great tool for dealing with stress and anxiety. I am more confident but also have better control of my ego. All of these factors have contributed to me making better life choices for health and family.”
The history of modern MMA competition can be traced to mixed style contests throughout Europe, Japan, and the Pacific Rim during the early 1900s.[19] In Japan, these contests were known as merikan, from the Japanese slang for "American [fighting]". Merikan contests were fought under a variety of rules, including points decision, best of three throws or knockdowns, and victory via knockout or submission.[20] 

Canada formally decriminalized mixed martial arts with a vote on Bill S-209 on June 5, 2013. The bill formally gives provinces the power to create athletic commissions to regulate and sanction professional mixed martial arts bouts.[56] Bill S-209 does not in and of itself make MMA legal across Canada; it allows provinces to make it legal on a province by province basis.[210]
Small, open-fingered gloves were introduced to protect fists, reduce the occurrence of cuts (and stoppages due to cuts) and encourage fighters to use their hands for striking to allow more captivating matches. Gloves were first made mandatory in Japan's Shooto promotion and were later adopted by the UFC as it developed into a regulated sport. Most professional fights have the fighters wear 4 oz gloves, whereas some jurisdictions require amateurs to wear a slightly heavier 6 oz glove for more protection for the hands and wrists.

Stuck at home without any equipment or gym to work with? A true Mixed Martial Artist doesn’t let his surroundings impact his training or spirit. Although we recommend joining an MMA gym, if you aren’t able to do that or if you currently can’t afford an MMA membership, there are still ways to get a good result from a home workout. In this guide, The MMA Guru will show you some of the best ways to get a good MMA/Boxing workout from home without the use of equipment! This is the ultimate MMA workout at home guide.


If you have time, complete two to three sets of push-ups, doing as many as you can for each set while maintaining good form, then finish your workout with a series of ab exercises, including planks, sit-ups, medicine ball oblique twists, and leg lifts. This is a great opportunity to really target the chest and abs. Adding just 5- to 10-minutes is a great way to finish things out.
Taking the time to set goals and make a plan is one thing. Applying it, walking it out, and making it happen is another beast. Life will always throw challenges your way. Make sure to take the time to assess “why” you are training so hard, otherwise, little distractions will knock you off course. It may be easy to stay focused if you have a fight schedule, but how consistent are you with nothing set?
While Mosley trains often and makes exercising a lifestyle, he also takes regular time off. “His body has to rest,” says Richardson. This is just as important for the average guy: When you complete a strenuous workout, your muscle fibers need time to recover. And if you’re working out every day, you aren’t giving them that opportunity. Enjoy a break every few days, and you’ll feel stronger when you return to the gym.

“The atmosphere is the biggest thing that drew me to this place when I first came and visited. The people were respectful and were there to learn. The classes are taught in a way that I find most effective for me to learn by presenting a problem and providing a potential solution to that problem. Also emphasis on position really helps to build a patient mindset that is needed while grappling to help avoid injury to your partner or oneself. All the instruction I have received here at the Cove has been top notch. As far as training partners go all those who train regularly during the day classes (Monday and Wednesday) are great. They all encourage me and help me learn the finer points of the technique that is taught that day. If your goals are self-defense, fitness, competition or just for fun Warrior’s Cove will give you a place to meet those goals. The Cove gives you a great place to learn in a safe environment that encourages learning and hard training that will get you to the goals that you set for yourself. I would recommend Warrior’s Cove to anyone looking for Martial Arts training.”
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