Rushfit by Georges St. Pierre is an 8-week program which includes a workout guide, a nutrition guide and training plans. All you need equipment are some dumbbells, around 25lbs should do the trick. The focus is on endurance rather than weight. The program comes with 6 dvds and it’s around $100, so the same as you would pay for P90X or Insanity except neither of those is hosted by Captain Canada.

Pursuing an Ethnic Studies degree will give you insight into the experiences, triumphs, and struggles of minority and ethnic groups in America. They are heavy on history, with a very specific historical focus, analyzing how a particular group got to where it is now, in modern day America. It incorporates a study of the culture's growth and development, and its shifting relationship with the majority population and government. It examines cultural artifacts, such as art, music, and literature, and utilizes philosophy and critical theories. 

Scenario training involves setting up a situation that mirrors a real assault. It's done in real environments with regular clothing and includes role playing so there is a designated attacker and designated victim. Although it is set up, if and when things get physical it should be live and "unlimited". Scenario training is a drill for the integration phase. Ideally, scenario training should involve at least 3 people. An instructor needs to design and set up the scenario and he or someone else should monitor how it goes down. There should be at least one attacker and one victim, and ideally a bystander or two that can be worked into the scenario.
The most common training mistake amongst fighters. In order to build elite level conditioning, fighters must have a solid aerobic base with a well-developed capacity for anaerobic efforts. As I mentioned earlier, the aerobic energy system is responsible for re-synthesizing ATP after periods of high intensity bursts, therefore influences how fighters recover in-between rounds AND in-between fighting exchanges. Since the aerobic system is developed through low-intensity cardio training, many coaches and fighters overlook this critical piece because it is, incorrectly, seen as inefficient. Oddly, fighters will perform an unnecessary amount of high intensity training along with their MMA training; a recipe for overtraining, sub-optimal recovery and increased risk of injury.
The actual curriculum of SPARology™ borrows very heavily from the foundations of Wrestling, Muay Thai and Boxing and steeped very deeply in each of the respective training methodologies. The SPARology™ structure necessitates that participants spend copious time in specific, though limited, sparring situations. As students develops in these situations and become more competent, more variables are added to the situations, allowing students to progress in a strength-based fashion. The results are a well rounded skill set developed at a level of comfort that adds to overall program retention. This “matrix” allows each athlete to forge a personal pathway or style, and as the old saying goes: “Styles Make Fights!”
Do a strength training workout three or four days a week. Weight training using free weights or specialized machines at the gym are good choices. Alternate between your upper and lower body each time you work out. You want to push yourself by lifting the heaviest possible weights, but you don't want to hurt yourself or become sore. Lessen the amount of weights or number of repetitions if you need to.
I trained 6 years. I never had much stand up but my jiu-jitsu was pretty good. That being said, size and strength matters. A guy 30 lbs heavier than me and fairly strong is going to give me a hard time. I knew guys who had jiu-jitsu beyond where the other guys size and stregnth mattered but this is very high level and it takes years of mat time to get there. After some training though a guy your weight and strength with no training will have no chance against you.

My first day was a real eye opener. I didn’t want to be like most beginners. I wanted to get right into free-sparring. This is where you wrestle other students to gain superior positions as they are taught in class. My first opponent was a towering gentleman by the name of Jan. (pronounced Yan) Being much taller than me, Jan had a considerable advantage not to mention he was also a gold belt. We started ‘rolling’ and he put me into his guard. To be in some ones guard means that you are trapped between their legs as they lay on their back. I had no choice but to give up. He then followed up by showing me ways to escape. This is what I love about this school. The other students aren’t there to ‘beat’ you. They are there to learn and to teach others as well. Mr. Arnebeck goes out of his way to do the same. He is never hesitant to demonstrate the move with you in order to answer your questions. The teaching is great, the students and staff are very helpful and receptive, and the atmosphere is that of a dedicated practice.
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