Hi there! I have a tiny problem(s). See I want to be a professional not just amateur fighter and want to be the fittest and best fighter I can be. I dont have a coach so I’m kind of doing this myself so yeah I need a lot of help. I do my workouts at home, and its all bodyweight, should I incorporate weight? And how often should I workout etc etc. Ive been working out 6 days a week between 45 min to 2 hours, lower body, upper, abs, cardio, etc. I havent been seeing the results I want and I think I need help. I also want to be a HARD hitter and improve my leg flexibility so I can head kick, kind of funny Im only flexible in my upper body… I want to be fast and have high endurance too of course to fight professionally at least eventually. And how long would it take to get me in that shape? I have a high metabolism too so it makes it a little harder to gain weight or well a lot. Any help would be appreciated thanks!

Conor McGregor fits the mold of the flashy fighter. While some of his counterparts attend media events wearing an understated t-shirt and baseball cap, McGregor is most comfortable delivering post-fight invectives in a designer suit. He sits at indoor press conferences behind a veneer of cockiness and thick sunglasses, bolstered by a professional MMA record of 19-2.
How is it that simulating a fight through shadow boxing can lead to more efficient, effective, and faster striking? Well, there is a ton of research on the benefits of deliberate practice for building fluency (i.e. performing automatically, quickly, and accurately) with any skill. Fluency results in relaxation. Relaxation results in effortless speed and power. Consider the 100-meter sprinter. He runs his best time when he’s running hard but relaxed. This relaxed exertion requires the fighter to find the right balance through practice to keep the tension out of his shoulders while directing his energy to strike at the opportune time. Relaxed exertion also positively impacts endurance-capabilities as it allows the fighter to be highly efficient in their striking.

The reason why we use the wording “Lead” and “Rear” instead of “Left” and “Right” is because when switching stances this can get confusing. Someone who is trying to master all styles of fighting should be able to fight in both Orthodox (Left foot first) and Southpaw (Right foot first). This is obviously better suited for MMA because it gives your opponent a different look for takedowns, while in boxing you’re only using punches and most boxers preferably only master one stance.
We emphasize three things: team, community and mixed martial arts, even if you're not in Houston! Everyone at Elite MMA is about growing each day, both inside and outside the school. We strive for success and balance in life, achieving goals in the following areas of life: physical, educational, family, financial, friendship, spiritual, and community. We hope you enjoy the information and make the choice to take action and begin your journey for martial arts in Houston with us. It is when we take action towards a goal, dream, or idea that we begin to reap the abundance life has to offer.�

We do this through the MMA Base, which consists of boxing, Thai boxing, stand-up wrestling, and Brazilian jiu jitsu. You don't have to become a high level MMA fighter, but you do need to train against completely uncooperative opponents attempting to kick, punch, and wrestle with you. Otherwise, you will not be prepared for it if it happens on the street. 

Weight training or resistance training used intelligently, can be used to enhance these athletic characteristics. Because all athletes have individual needs, a generic program, like this one below, will need to be modified for the style of fighting, age, goals, facilities available and so on. However, here's a weights program, starting out, that you can use to set yourself up for martial arts competition fighting.
Muhammad Ali vs. Antonio Inoki took place in Japan in 1976. The classic match-up between professional boxer and professional wrestler turned sour as each fighter refused to engage in the other's style, and after a 15-round stalemate it was declared a draw. Muhammad Ali sustained a substantial amount of damage to his legs, as Antonio Inoki slide-kicked him continuously for the duration of the bout, causing him to be hospitalized for the next three days.[31] The fight played an important role in the history of mixed martial arts.[32] In Japan, the match inspired Inoki's students Masakatsu Funaki and Minoru Suzuki to found Pancrase in 1993, which in turn inspired the foundation of Pride Fighting Championships in 1997. Pride was acquired by its rival Ultimate Fighting Championship in 2007.[33][34]
May See Xiong of Burnsville said her son Lucas, 10, used to take taekwondo lessons but switched to MMA and hasn’t looked back. Her other son, Lex, 7, has joined him in classes at two local gyms. Xiong and her husband enjoy watching UFC fights at home on TV. The action piqued the interest of her boys: “My son said, ‘Well, I want to learn how to do that, too,’ ” she said.
“To me the Warriors Cove is much more than a martial arts school.  I came to the Warriors Cove 4 years ago.  I was very out of shape and weak.  I struggled at first against bigger and stronger opponents.  But I fell in love with the game, and stuck with it.  MMA, for me is the only physical activity that has ever been able to hold my interest.  I know if it wasn’t for finding the Warriors Cove, I would still be weak and out of shape.”
This is due to a combination of factors, including discriminatory laws, lack of funding for public health initiatives, lack of business investment, and negative, prejudiced attitudes from more privileged populations. The recent case of lead contamination in the water of Flint, Michigan—a majority African American city—is a prime example of this, but the issues are certainly not limited to the U.S.

Put two of the middleweight division’s top rising stars – each with a five-fight winning streak – in the Octagon together, and you expect that there will be plenty of compelling action. And Robert Whittaker and Derek Brunson delivered on those expectations. What fans didn’t know that all that action was going to get crammed into a little over four minutes. Sure, it was sloppy and frantic at times before Whittaker pulled off the victory, but if you were watching, you couldn’t look away. That’s a great fight.
“Everything has been AWESOME so far….best Martial Arts work out EVER….change NOTHING. WOW…is all that I can say about EVERYONE I have come into contact with….from Mr. Arnebeck to Bob P. to Randy and Josh L….great instructors who take the time to go over techniques with everyone in class and answer any questions…knowing my wrestling background they have all tried to teach me moves that would be suited to a grappler. I have recommended it a ton of people…..I am an assistant wrestling coach at the local high school and I have recommended that all my kids try it. I have done a wide variety of different martial arts-(Wu Shu Kung-Fu {2nd degree green}, boxing{6-2 4kos}, all types of amateur wrestling-{state champion freestyle and Greco-roman} and some Sambo/Judo) and I can say that without a doubt the Warriors Cove is what I have been searching for.  From the great class environment to the instructors everything I have encountered has been great.”

There are still some strength and conditioning coaches out there who train the fighters as if the gym, not the cage, was their main sport. If your athlete gets seriously injured during a conditioning session and you jeopardize his/her career because of it, it means you failed as a trainer. Therefore the selection of exercise and equipment according to athlete’s ability is so important. The gym is not a place to take risks.
Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu emphasizes taking an opponent to the ground and utilizing ground fighting techniques and submission holds involving joint-locks and choke holds also found in numerous other arts with or without ground fighting emphasis. The premise is that most of the advantage of a larger, stronger opponent comes from superior reach and more powerful strikes, both of which are somewhat negated when grappling on the ground.
×